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Put the Axis1 Eagle putter in the bag for a trial...


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#1 QWKDTSN

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Posted 14 November 2010 - 09:50 PM

I was one of the three lucky winners of the Axis 1 Eagle putter thanks to GolfWRX's contest.

The golf season is quickly winding down here, but I still can't help but get out on the course almost every opportunity I have;  I've given the Eagle a brief test drive today, and would like to relay my findings (I'll likely have it in the bag for a while to see what happens).

First of all, the quality of the head is pretty good.  It is cast and there aren't any rough edges to be found on the back cavities.  The sole is highly polished and the face of the putter has a copper insert, with the whole face being milled flat.  The appearance of the face and the insert are very very nice.

The topline, above the cavity, is brushed, which gives it a different finish from the rest of the bead-blasted surfaces that are visible, but it's not as highly polished as the sole, so it shouldn't glare.  There is an alignment line in the cavity which is painted black, and for some reason it was made to be very wide, 2-3 times wider than most alignment lines.  IMO the putter would be easier to line up if the cavity line was more thin, as the thick line doesn't feel as 'precise', but that's a personal preference thing.

The shaft is fluted and has a nice bendy feel when stroking longer putts.  The copper insert feels pretty nice, and it does seem to have decent MOI properties, as it feels good and puts a nice roll on the ball even when missing the sweet spot.  I've found distance control to be pretty natural with this putter so far.  Setup is very odd at first, with the heel of the putter almost smothering the ball and a long toe hanging out way too far, but I got used to it pretty quickly.  The novelty of the balance made up for the setup appearance.

The grip that came on the putter HAD to go - it's a Winn Jumbo Paddle grip which is oversized and has horrible, very sharp edges and a fat, flat paddle shape.  It was extremely uncomfortable and I removed it after one quick practice session and replaced it with a Golf Pride Tour Tradition grip, which is very similar to a Pingman.  I know grips are a personal preference but the shape of the grip that came with it is just awful and I don't know how anyone could use something with such sharp edges.

Of course, this putter has a very unique shape, all in order to give it its perfect balance.  I will say that knowing why the putter is shaped this way makes the appearance of it much more bearable.  It is strange looking, but the designer did a good job making it look as decent as he could while still retaining the perfect balance concept.  I wouldn't be surprised if, in the future, revised designs began to appear that looked a little less wonky, but there are only so many ways to distribute the weight of a putter while still keeping it at the right head weight.

The balance of the putter is really cool!  Because it does not have 'toe flow' or 'face balancing', the putter doesn't have any built-in tendancies;  It doesn't want to open or close as you swing it.  It stays perfectly square to the arc of your stroke, so long as your arms and hands are relaxed and you use a pure rocking of the shoulders to power the stroke.  Over the past year I've putted with heel-shafted blades and left-hand-low with face-balanced mallets, and this is the first putter that I've seen which I can set up and stroke one way - with a Phil Mickelson style setup - and then switch to setting up left-hand low, without the putter fighting my stroke one way or the other.

Certain putters are certainly more suited for certain types of setups and strokes, but because this one doesn't do anything by itself - it doesn't resist turning, or want to turn over more - I think almost anybody could pick this up and roll the ball with it without changing anything, no matter whether they have a very arced stroke or a very SBST stroke.  I must say it's very interesting to swing the putter and not feel it trying to twist at all.  The best way I can describe it would be to stroke a broom-handle with a weight at the end - the putterhead is balanced around the line of the shaft, so you just stroke the shaft towards the target line and, as long as your hands don't twitch during the stroke, the putterhead squares itself up.

All in all I find the feel of this putter to be very pleasing, I really like the way it feels when swinging it.  Very natural, despite its unnatural shape.  Does the build quality justify the $300 price tag?  I would say no, it doesn't;  The thin nylon headcover, uncomfortable stock grip, and cast head definitely don't add up to that much money;  However, I think the perfect balance design might.  If you get a chance to try one out, give it a roll;  I wouldn't be surprised if more and more people discover that this kind of putter balance suits their stroke.  It certainly feels natural to me.


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#2 LuisP

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Posted 16 November 2010 - 06:09 PM

View PostQWKDTSN, on 14 November 2010 - 09:50 PM, said:

I was one of the three lucky winners of the Axis 1 Eagle putter thanks to GolfWRX's contest.

The golf season is quickly winding down here, but I still can't help but get out on the course almost every opportunity I have;  I've given the Eagle a brief test drive today, and would like to relay my findings (I'll likely have it in the bag for a while to see what happens).

First of all, the quality of the head is pretty good.  It is cast and there aren't any rough edges to be found on the back cavities.  The sole is highly polished and the face of the putter has a copper insert, with the whole face being milled flat.  The appearance of the face and the insert are very very nice.

The topline, above the cavity, is brushed, which gives it a different finish from the rest of the bead-blasted surfaces that are visible, but it's not as highly polished as the sole, so it shouldn't glare.  There is an alignment line in the cavity which is painted black, and for some reason it was made to be very wide, 2-3 times wider than most alignment lines.  IMO the putter would be easier to line up if the cavity line was more thin, as the thick line doesn't feel as 'precise', but that's a personal preference thing.

The shaft is fluted and has a nice bendy feel when stroking longer putts.  The copper insert feels pretty nice, and it does seem to have decent MOI properties, as it feels good and puts a nice roll on the ball even when missing the sweet spot.  I've found distance control to be pretty natural with this putter so far.  Setup is very odd at first, with the heel of the putter almost smothering the ball and a long toe hanging out way too far, but I got used to it pretty quickly.  The novelty of the balance made up for the setup appearance.

The grip that came on the putter HAD to go - it's a Winn Jumbo Paddle grip which is oversized and has horrible, very sharp edges and a fat, flat paddle shape.  It was extremely uncomfortable and I removed it after one quick practice session and replaced it with a Golf Pride Tour Tradition grip, which is very similar to a Pingman.  I know grips are a personal preference but the shape of the grip that came with it is just awful and I don't know how anyone could use something with such sharp edges.

Of course, this putter has a very unique shape, all in order to give it its perfect balance.  I will say that knowing why the putter is shaped this way makes the appearance of it much more bearable.  It is strange looking, but the designer did a good job making it look as decent as he could while still retaining the perfect balance concept.  I wouldn't be surprised if, in the future, revised designs began to appear that looked a little less wonky, but there are only so many ways to distribute the weight of a putter while still keeping it at the right head weight.

The balance of the putter is really cool!  Because it does not have 'toe flow' or 'face balancing', the putter doesn't have any built-in tendancies;  It doesn't want to open or close as you swing it.  It stays perfectly square to the arc of your stroke, so long as your arms and hands are relaxed and you use a pure rocking of the shoulders to power the stroke.  Over the past year I've putted with heel-shafted blades and left-hand-low with face-balanced mallets, and this is the first putter that I've seen which I can set up and stroke one way - with a Phil Mickelson style setup - and then switch to setting up left-hand low, without the putter fighting my stroke one way or the other.

Certain putters are certainly more suited for certain types of setups and strokes, but because this one doesn't do anything by itself - it doesn't resist turning, or want to turn over more - I think almost anybody could pick this up and roll the ball with it without changing anything, no matter whether they have a very arced stroke or a very SBST stroke.  I must say it's very interesting to swing the putter and not feel it trying to twist at all.  The best way I can describe it would be to stroke a broom-handle with a weight at the end - the putterhead is balanced around the line of the shaft, so you just stroke the shaft towards the target line and, as long as your hands don't twitch during the stroke, the putterhead squares itself up.

All in all I find the feel of this putter to be very pleasing, I really like the way it feels when swinging it.  Very natural, despite its unnatural shape.  Does the build quality justify the $300 price tag?  I would say no, it doesn't;  The thin nylon headcover, uncomfortable stock grip, and cast head definitely don't add up to that much money;  However, I think the perfect balance design might.  If you get a chance to try one out, give it a roll;  I wouldn't be surprised if more and more people discover that this kind of putter balance suits their stroke.  It certainly feels natural to me.


Thank you for your thoughtful review of the Axis1 putter. Iím glad to hear that you can feel the difference of a perfect balance putter.   I would like to point out a simple fact about the design and engineering of this putter. Your typical putter can be designed and engineered in a matter of days.  The Axis1 putter on the other hand, required months of design development and hundreds of iterations.  Every gram of weight affects where the center of gravity is located and in order to place the CG exactly on the sweet-spot of the striking face, and in line with the shaft, accounting for every gram of weight was no easy task. To machine a putter with this type of complex geometry would make the price of the putter prohibitive.



Unfortunately, grips are a very personal choice. The top of the line Winn grip that was chosen for the Axis1, has also received great feedback for the way it stabilizes and quiets the golfers hands.  Itís hard to pick a grip that will appeal to everyone, especially at a time when the market seems to be moving towards larger grips.



If anyone has any other questions, I will be happy to respond.



Luis

President/CEO

Axis1



#3 odshot68

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 07:43 PM

I would really try to try one..do any of the big box shops have them to try first.

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#4 caseyc1

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 08:01 PM

View PostLuisP, on 16 November 2010 - 06:09 PM, said:

View PostQWKDTSN, on 14 November 2010 - 09:50 PM, said:

I was one of the three lucky winners of the Axis 1 Eagle putter thanks to GolfWRX's contest.

The golf season is quickly winding down here, but I still can't help but get out on the course almost every opportunity I have;  I've given the Eagle a brief test drive today, and would like to relay my findings (I'll likely have it in the bag for a while to see what happens).

First of all, the quality of the head is pretty good.  It is cast and there aren't any rough edges to be found on the back cavities.  The sole is highly polished and the face of the putter has a copper insert, with the whole face being milled flat.  The appearance of the face and the insert are very very nice.

The topline, above the cavity, is brushed, which gives it a different finish from the rest of the bead-blasted surfaces that are visible, but it's not as highly polished as the sole, so it shouldn't glare.  There is an alignment line in the cavity which is painted black, and for some reason it was made to be very wide, 2-3 times wider than most alignment lines.  IMO the putter would be easier to line up if the cavity line was more thin, as the thick line doesn't feel as 'precise', but that's a personal preference thing.

The shaft is fluted and has a nice bendy feel when stroking longer putts.  The copper insert feels pretty nice, and it does seem to have decent MOI properties, as it feels good and puts a nice roll on the ball even when missing the sweet spot.  I've found distance control to be pretty natural with this putter so far.  Setup is very odd at first, with the heel of the putter almost smothering the ball and a long toe hanging out way too far, but I got used to it pretty quickly.  The novelty of the balance made up for the setup appearance.

The grip that came on the putter HAD to go - it's a Winn Jumbo Paddle grip which is oversized and has horrible, very sharp edges and a fat, flat paddle shape.  It was extremely uncomfortable and I removed it after one quick practice session and replaced it with a Golf Pride Tour Tradition grip, which is very similar to a Pingman.  I know grips are a personal preference but the shape of the grip that came with it is just awful and I don't know how anyone could use something with such sharp edges.

Of course, this putter has a very unique shape, all in order to give it its perfect balance.  I will say that knowing why the putter is shaped this way makes the appearance of it much more bearable.  It is strange looking, but the designer did a good job making it look as decent as he could while still retaining the perfect balance concept.  I wouldn't be surprised if, in the future, revised designs began to appear that looked a little less wonky, but there are only so many ways to distribute the weight of a putter while still keeping it at the right head weight.

The balance of the putter is really cool!  Because it does not have 'toe flow' or 'face balancing', the putter doesn't have any built-in tendancies;  It doesn't want to open or close as you swing it.  It stays perfectly square to the arc of your stroke, so long as your arms and hands are relaxed and you use a pure rocking of the shoulders to power the stroke.  Over the past year I've putted with heel-shafted blades and left-hand-low with face-balanced mallets, and this is the first putter that I've seen which I can set up and stroke one way - with a Phil Mickelson style setup - and then switch to setting up left-hand low, without the putter fighting my stroke one way or the other.

Certain putters are certainly more suited for certain types of setups and strokes, but because this one doesn't do anything by itself - it doesn't resist turning, or want to turn over more - I think almost anybody could pick this up and roll the ball with it without changing anything, no matter whether they have a very arced stroke or a very SBST stroke.  I must say it's very interesting to swing the putter and not feel it trying to twist at all.  The best way I can describe it would be to stroke a broom-handle with a weight at the end - the putterhead is balanced around the line of the shaft, so you just stroke the shaft towards the target line and, as long as your hands don't twitch during the stroke, the putterhead squares itself up.

All in all I find the feel of this putter to be very pleasing, I really like the way it feels when swinging it.  Very natural, despite its unnatural shape.  Does the build quality justify the $300 price tag?  I would say no, it doesn't;  The thin nylon headcover, uncomfortable stock grip, and cast head definitely don't add up to that much money;  However, I think the perfect balance design might.  If you get a chance to try one out, give it a roll;  I wouldn't be surprised if more and more people discover that this kind of putter balance suits their stroke.  It certainly feels natural to me.


Thank you for your thoughtful review of the Axis1 putter. I'm glad to hear that you can feel the difference of a perfect balance putter.   I would like to point out a simple fact about the design and engineering of this putter. Your typical putter can be designed and engineered in a matter of days.  The Axis1 putter on the other hand, required months of design development and hundreds of iterations.  Every gram of weight affects where the center of gravity is located and in order to place the CG exactly on the sweet-spot of the striking face, and in line with the shaft, accounting for every gram of weight was no easy task. To machine a putter with this type of complex geometry would make the price of the putter prohibitive.



Unfortunately, grips are a very personal choice. The top of the line Winn grip that was chosen for the Axis1, has also received great feedback for the way it stabilizes and quiets the golfers hands.  It's hard to pick a grip that will appeal to everyone, especially at a time when the market seems to be moving towards larger grips.



If anyone has any other questions, I will be happy to respond.



Luis

President/CEO

Axis1



Very Cool that a President/CEO takes the time to chime in on here, thanks
Also :welcomeani: to the Forum

#5 dawgfan03

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Posted 07 February 2011 - 12:35 PM

I would say there is something special about this putter. I bought it and felt the face did hold the line slighlty longer than other putters.





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