Jump to content

Welcome, Guest. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with existing members and access to certain forums. Join our community today and enter into a chance to win a free regular giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

Bending iron lofts weaker, good or bad idea?


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 pappaf2

pappaf2

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,273 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 99231
  • Joined: 11/26/2009
  • Location:Bay Area, CA
GolfWRX Likes : 92

Posted 31 October 2010 - 03:03 AM

I was looking at some Wilson Di7 irons and really liked the way they felt when I was swinging them. They seem like a great iron (good reviews) but after reading up about them I am a bit put off by their very strong lofts. The PW in this set has only 43* of loft. It got me thinking about having the lofts bent weaker so they are not quite so jacked up. Basically I'd be looking at bending the set anywhere from 1* to 2* depending on the club to make them closer to callaway lofts (45* PW). Any thoughts on if this is a reasonable amount to bend them without hurting playability? From what I have read it looks like it will add 1* of bounce for every 1* you weaken the loft. The specs on the Di7's show that they don't have much bounce to begin with so maybe adding a little won't have to much negative effects. What other negative effects could I be looking at by bending the irons weaker?  Or would this be a waste of time and I'd be better off leaving lofts as is? (or looking for a set of clubs with lofts closer to what I'm looking for?)

Wilson Di7 Irons

IRONSPECIFICATIONS

Club Loft Lie Length SW Bounce

  #4   23   60      39.0   D2    0.5

  #5   25.561   38.5   D2    1.0

  #6   28.561.5   38.0   D2    1.0

  #7   31.562   37.5   D2    1.5

  #8   35    63 37.0   D2 1.5

  #9   39    63.5   36.5   D2    2.0

  #P   43    64      36.0  D2 2.0

  #G      49    64 36.0   D4      3.0

  #S   55    64      36.0   D6 8.0

We're not here for a long time,
just a good time.

Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with existing members and access to certain forums. Join our community today and enter into a chance to win a free regular giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

#2 jaskanski

jaskanski

    Hall of Fame

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,954 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 62078
  • Joined: 08/01/2008
GolfWRX Likes : 680

Posted 31 October 2010 - 03:35 AM

I would ignore the fact you have a 4-GW set and imagine you have a 3-PW set with traditional lofts. That way, you would have a 43* 9-iron for example. Bending lofts is all very well, but it depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If it's to dial-in a precise yardage on a club with a specific loft by tweaking the odd degree or two, that's fine. It all depends on how accurate you are with your irons. If you have yardage dispersion up to tour levels (+/- 3 yards) that the 1 degree difference can make, then it's worth considering. Again, the bounce angle won't be affected too much by a modest increase in loft, neither will the offset on each club. The old rule of thumb is to make any adjustment as small as possible to make a useable difference to your game. It's a safe bet that tweaking the di7's enough to make a useable difference may be a tweak too far. In the case of the Di7's, a weaker 7-iron may as well be your existing 8-iron etc. If you have fat shaft heads you may be screwed anyway - they're almost impossible to bend. You may have hit the nail on the head with your last sentence in your post.

#3 taskerc

taskerc

    taskerc

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 354 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67180
  • Joined: 10/06/2008
  • Location:Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Ebay ID:golferguy2727
GolfWRX Likes : 2

Posted 31 October 2010 - 06:14 AM

 jaskanski, on 31 October 2010 - 03:35 AM, said:

I would ignore the fact you have a 4-GW set and imagine you have a 3-PW set with traditional lofts.

+1 - this is now why the Gap wedge is so prevalent ....  If it were me, I would leave them and find ways to fill the gaps you actually have.  Bending is an option of course but to adjust the set you could easily get to a balanced set of gaps in your existing lofts to make it not matter any more.

After all, it really does not matter what number is on the club, although with the juiced Wilsons and Cobras, it can be fun to hit the PW past others' 9s :-)




#4 jeffrey r

jeffrey r

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,321 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 83556
  • Joined: 05/21/2009
  • Location:Northern New Jersey
GolfWRX Likes : 34

Posted 31 October 2010 - 06:40 AM

I go through the same predicament when I play my Wilson Staff Di9 irons.  They're flat-out sweet irons, but Wilson really made things difficult with the screwy lofts.  I really have to map out my 14 clubs carefully with the Di9s, and since the PW being under 43* caused them to include 2 gap wedges at 46* and 49.5*, it means I usually have to drop a fairway wood/long hybrid or an extra wedge like a LW.  When I play my G5 irons, it is an easier prep for me at the higher end, as I go from the 46* PW to the G5 UW at 50*, and then usually a 54* SW and 58* LW.  I still don't understand the rationale behind jacking up lofts so much (other than pure marketing).
Ping K15 10.5*, BB R
Taylormade Burner TP 17.5* 5w, 75 R
Ping G25 20* and 23* Hybrids, TFC R
Ping G15 Irons 5-UW, CFS S
Taylormade ATV Carbon Steel 54* and 58*
Odyssey MXM-V #9HT Putter, 34"

#5 pappaf2

pappaf2

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,273 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 99231
  • Joined: 11/26/2009
  • Location:Bay Area, CA
GolfWRX Likes : 92

Posted 31 October 2010 - 02:41 PM

 jaskanski, on 31 October 2010 - 03:35 AM, said:

I would ignore the fact you have a 4-GW set and imagine you have a 3-PW set with traditional lofts. That way, you would have a 43* 9-iron for example. Bending lofts is all very well, but it depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If it's to dial-in a precise yardage on a club with a specific loft by tweaking the odd degree or two, that's fine. It all depends on how accurate you are with your irons. If you have yardage dispersion up to tour levels (+/- 3 yards) that the 1 degree difference can make, then it's worth considering. Again, the bounce angle won't be affected too much by a modest increase in loft, neither will the offset on each club. The old rule of thumb is to make any adjustment as small as possible to make a useable difference to your game. It's a safe bet that tweaking the di7's enough to make a useable difference may be a tweak too far. In the case of the Di7's, a weaker 7-iron may as well be your existing 8-iron etc. If you have fat shaft heads you may be screwed anyway - they're almost impossible to bend. You may have hit the nail on the head with your last sentence in your post.


Ya I guess the way to go would be to just play it like you said, 3-PW as opposed to 4-GW. It might be worth it to just bend the PW weaker one degree to make it a 5* gap between the 9 to PW and PW to GW.

 taskerc, on 31 October 2010 - 06:14 AM, said:

 jaskanski, on 31 October 2010 - 03:35 AM, said:

I would ignore the fact you have a 4-GW set and imagine you have a 3-PW set with traditional lofts.

+1 - this is now why the Gap wedge is so prevalent ....  If it were me, I would leave them and find ways to fill the gaps you actually have.  Bending is an option of course but to adjust the set you could easily get to a balanced set of gaps in your existing lofts to make it not matter any more.

After all, it really does not matter what number is on the club, although with the juiced Wilsons and Cobras, it can be fun to hit the PW past others' 9s :-)





I don't own the irons yet, I'm just trying to find out what options I have if I do. I think bending the PW to 44* and then adding a 54* SW after the 49* GW would be decent.

 jeffrey r, on 31 October 2010 - 06:40 AM, said:

I go through the same predicament when I play my Wilson Staff Di9 irons.  They're flat-out sweet irons, but Wilson really made things difficult with the screwy lofts.  I really have to map out my 14 clubs carefully with the Di9s, and since the PW being under 43* caused them to include 2 gap wedges at 46* and 49.5*, it means I usually have to drop a fairway wood/long hybrid or an extra wedge like a LW.  When I play my G5 irons, it is an easier prep for me at the higher end, as I go from the 46* PW to the G5 UW at 50*, and then usually a 54* SW and 58* LW.  I still don't understand the rationale behind jacking up lofts so much (other than pure marketing).


I like the Di7's but you are right the Wilson lofts make it tough to get used to. Since you use both the G5 and the Di9 irons which do you like better? How do they compare? I have been looking at G5's as well.

Edited by pappaf2, 31 October 2010 - 06:09 PM.

We're not here for a long time,
just a good time.

#6 wcbjr

wcbjr

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 810 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 114048
  • Joined: 08/31/2010
  • Handicap:0.2
GolfWRX Likes : 49

Posted 31 October 2010 - 04:58 PM

You can do what I am about to do with an Fi5 set.  I have a backup set and am taking the PW and bending it back 4 degrees for a matching gap wedge.  Yes, I know the bounce will be increased a bit, but it is only very slight.

#7 kloyd0306

kloyd0306

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 866 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 89787
  • Joined: 07/27/2009
GolfWRX Likes : 67

Posted 31 October 2010 - 07:51 PM

Six degree jumps from the PW to the GW and GW to SW.
Makes a mockery of actually giving each club a number doesn' t it?
You are going to need four or five wedges.......
Ridiculous!

#8 reg1900

reg1900

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 941 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 114861
  • Joined: 09/14/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 29

Posted 01 November 2010 - 08:46 AM

2* gap from 4i to 5i, what the hell?

Ignore the numbers on the club, do you use hybrids? With the 5i loft being so low you could lose a 5w and pick up an extra wedge. Get a 20* hybrid to be a 5w/3 iron. The PW is actually a 9i, so get a real PW at 47 and a GW at 52.

God I hate this, give us back our PW! Instead of stuffing around figuring how to come up with a proper set up, this BS is making people play worse, someone who doesn't know better will have a 13* gap to their SW.

Actually, don't buy the clubs as an f u to Wilson for having a 43* PW

#9 jeffrey r

jeffrey r

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,321 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 83556
  • Joined: 05/21/2009
  • Location:Northern New Jersey
GolfWRX Likes : 34

Posted 01 November 2010 - 12:08 PM

 pappaf2, on 31 October 2010 - 02:41 PM, said:

I like the Di7's but you are right the Wilson lofts make it tough to get used to. Since you use both the G5 and the Di9 irons which do you like better? How do they compare? I have been looking at G5's as well.

Answering this question specifically, I'll give a quick rundown.  I bought both my G5 and Di9 irons sets used at the start of this season.  I'll preface my thoughts by saying that though I am an athletic guy, I've only been golfing a couple of years, I only get a chance to golf every couple/few weeks, and this season I played about 8 rounds (split pretty much evenly between the Di9s and G5s).  So I don't play all that often, and I did not get a ton of rounds in with either iron set to really test out the set or to ever get overly comfortable with either set (or any set for that matter).

Bottom line, they are both great sets of irons.  There is something about the Di9s that makes them lots of fun to play, the heads are a nice size without being too big and clunky, I really like the uniflex steel shafts, and a smooth swing will generally give a nice straight and high ball flight (though they are of course not immune to bad shots).  As we know, the lofts are kind of funky, but once you get a system down with them, it is not all that hard to get a good 14-club set in place.

The G5s are classic Ping GI irons, so you generally know what you are going to get.  They are relatively easy to play, and I had no problem getting used to the thick soles, and it took me a round or two to get used to playing this type of iron.  My set has the CS Lite R flex shafts, which I know are not all that highly regarded.  I think they play fine for me, but I can see how there could be a preference for a different shaft like the AWT.

Anyway, I was not able to draw a real conclusion this season about which set I prefer.  Ping irons have a certain allure to them, and I found it hard not to choose the G5s when I went to play a round.  But anytime that I chose the Di9s, I loved playing them, and probably played the Di9s a bit better.  As an example, my course has a par 3 that goes about 150-170 yards depending on pin placement.  The 4 times I played my Di9s, with the ball teed up very low, I'd generally use my 6 or 7 iron, and I think I was on or right near the green each time.  With my G5s, using around the same club, I shanked it each time.  That could probably be remedied with just getting some consistency down, but the Di9 got the job done each time.  Both great sets though for mid-high cappers.

Edited by jeffrey r, 01 November 2010 - 12:09 PM.

Ping K15 10.5*, BB R
Taylormade Burner TP 17.5* 5w, 75 R
Ping G25 20* and 23* Hybrids, TFC R
Ping G15 Irons 5-UW, CFS S
Taylormade ATV Carbon Steel 54* and 58*
Odyssey MXM-V #9HT Putter, 34"

#10 pappaf2

pappaf2

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,273 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 99231
  • Joined: 11/26/2009
  • Location:Bay Area, CA
GolfWRX Likes : 92

Posted 01 November 2010 - 01:49 PM

 reg1900, on 01 November 2010 - 08:46 AM, said:

2* gap from 4i to 5i, what the hell?

Ignore the numbers on the club, do you use hybrids? With the 5i loft being so low you could lose a 5w and pick up an extra wedge. Get a 20* hybrid to be a 5w/3 iron. The PW is actually a 9i, so get a real PW at 47 and a GW at 52.

God I hate this, give us back our PW! Instead of stuffing around figuring how to come up with a proper set up, this BS is making people play worse, someone who doesn't know better will have a 13* gap to their SW.

Actually, don't buy the clubs as an f u to Wilson for having a 43* PW

I do play a 22* hybrid right now so I guess I'd just be dropping the 4 iron out of the bag anyway. I feel really silly for thinking this much about a set of clubs I don't even own, but with the strong lofts I want to make sure I don't put myself in a tough spot from a club selection standpoint.

 jeffrey r, on 01 November 2010 - 12:08 PM, said:

 pappaf2, on 31 October 2010 - 02:41 PM, said:

I like the Di7's but you are right the Wilson lofts make it tough to get used to. Since you use both the G5 and the Di9 irons which do you like better? How do they compare? I have been looking at G5's as well.

Answering this question specifically, I'll give a quick rundown.  I bought both my G5 and Di9 irons sets used at the start of this season.  I'll preface my thoughts by saying that though I am an athletic guy, I've only been golfing a couple of years, I only get a chance to golf every couple/few weeks, and this season I played about 8 rounds (split pretty much evenly between the Di9s and G5s).  So I don't play all that often, and I did not get a ton of rounds in with either iron set to really test out the set or to ever get overly comfortable with either set (or any set for that matter).

Bottom line, they are both great sets of irons.  There is something about the Di9s that makes them lots of fun to play, the heads are a nice size without being too big and clunky, I really like the uniflex steel shafts, and a smooth swing will generally give a nice straight and high ball flight (though they are of course not immune to bad shots).  As we know, the lofts are kind of funky, but once you get a system down with them, it is not all that hard to get a good 14-club set in place.

The G5s are classic Ping GI irons, so you generally know what you are going to get.  They are relatively easy to play, and I had no problem getting used to the thick soles, and it took me a round or two to get used to playing this type of iron.  My set has the CS Lite R flex shafts, which I know are not all that highly regarded.  I think they play fine for me, but I can see how there could be a preference for a different shaft like the AWT.

Anyway, I was not able to draw a real conclusion this season about which set I prefer.  Ping irons have a certain allure to them, and I found it hard not to choose the G5s when I went to play a round.  But anytime that I chose the Di9s, I loved playing them, and probably played the Di9s a bit better.  As an example, my course has a par 3 that goes about 150-170 yards depending on pin placement.  The 4 times I played my Di9s, with the ball teed up very low, I'd generally use my 6 or 7 iron, and I think I was on or right near the green each time.  With my G5s, using around the same club, I shanked it each time.  That could probably be remedied with just getting some consistency down, but the Di9 got the job done each time.  Both great sets though for mid-high cappers.

I appreciate you giving your thoughts on the clubs. Ya being a high capper myself either of the sets would probably work out fine. Maybe I am worring too much about it but I feel like the funny lofts with the wilsons my mess with my mind. Although if I just start thinking of it in terms of loft instead of club number and figure out how far I hit each one I am sure those mental problems would fade away.

We're not here for a long time,
just a good time.

Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with existing members and access to certain forums. Join our community today and enter into a chance to win a free regular giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

#11 taskerc

taskerc

    taskerc

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 354 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67180
  • Joined: 10/06/2008
  • Location:Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Ebay ID:golferguy2727
GolfWRX Likes : 2

Posted 01 November 2010 - 01:58 PM

 pappaf2, on 01 November 2010 - 01:49 PM, said:

I feel really silly for thinking this much about a set of clubs I don't even own, but with the strong lofts I want to make sure I don't put myself in a tough spot from a club selection standpoint.

Don't - I have the same issue - my Cobra S2s are waiting to be picked up but I went through the same grief.  Here is the Cobra S2 loft array :-)

4i  22
5i  25
6i  28
7i  31
8i  35
9i  39
PW  43
GW  49

Look at those lower gaps between clubs ..... Yikes :-)  But I am currently playing 5 deg gaps at wedges now so hopefully it will not be soooo bad.  I will be running a Ping Tour W 54 and 58 or 60 with this full set so we will see what happens.  But the exercise taught me not to bother reading the number on the club since it is kinda irrelevant now.  Hopefully the play difference will be an overall good fit for me.

So worry not, you are not alone :-)

#12 jeffrey r

jeffrey r

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,321 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 83556
  • Joined: 05/21/2009
  • Location:Northern New Jersey
GolfWRX Likes : 34

Posted 01 November 2010 - 02:27 PM

The lofts of those S2s are why Wilson includes the second gap wedge (which they call the AW) in between the PW and GW (see the Di9 lofts below).  I don't have a 4 iron in my Di9 set, so I start with the 5 iron, and then play some combination of Wilson Fybrids below that (usually a 3 or 5 wood, 19.5 Fybrid, and then a 3 or 4 hybrid), and then use the Di9 5-GW, and usually a 56* SW.  

But again, as alluded to, when I'm on the course, I just play and don't get too hung up on what clubs or lofts I have.  There are many times that I reach for my 46* AW, and then many times where I am closer to the pin and reach for my 49.5* GW.  And since the Di9s are very forgiving, those 2 clubs are quite versatile.

3I= 18*
4I= 21.5*
5I= 25*
6I= 28.5*
7I= 32*
8I= 35.5*
9I= 39*
PW= 42.5*
AW= 46*
GW= 49.5*
SW= 55*


Wilson also has a "fitting" system that will take some basic info and recommend a 12-club set to complement a driver and putter.  It is a simple guide to help compile a 14-club set.

http://www.wilson.co.../us/GetFit.html

Edited by jeffrey r, 01 November 2010 - 02:33 PM.

Ping K15 10.5*, BB R
Taylormade Burner TP 17.5* 5w, 75 R
Ping G25 20* and 23* Hybrids, TFC R
Ping G15 Irons 5-UW, CFS S
Taylormade ATV Carbon Steel 54* and 58*
Odyssey MXM-V #9HT Putter, 34"

#13 pappaf2

pappaf2

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,273 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 99231
  • Joined: 11/26/2009
  • Location:Bay Area, CA
GolfWRX Likes : 92

Posted 01 November 2010 - 03:16 PM

 taskerc, on 01 November 2010 - 01:58 PM, said:

 pappaf2, on 01 November 2010 - 01:49 PM, said:

I feel really silly for thinking this much about a set of clubs I don't even own, but with the strong lofts I want to make sure I don't put myself in a tough spot from a club selection standpoint.

Don't - I have the same issue - my Cobra S2s are waiting to be picked up but I went through the same grief.  Here is the Cobra S2 loft array :-)

Look at those lower gaps between clubs ..... Yikes :-)  But I am currently playing 5 deg gaps at wedges now so hopefully it will not be soooo bad.  I will be running a Ping Tour W 54 and 58 or 60 with this full set so we will see what happens.  But the exercise taught me not to bother reading the number on the club since it is kinda irrelevant now.  Hopefully the play difference will be an overall good fit for me.

So worry not, you are not alone :-)

Glad to know I am not crazy and not alone. :drinks:  I hope this set works out for you.

 jeffrey r, on 01 November 2010 - 02:27 PM, said:

The lofts of those S2s are why Wilson includes the second gap wedge (which they call the AW) in between the PW and GW (see the Di9 lofts below).  I don't have a 4 iron in my Di9 set, so I start with the 5 iron, and then play some combination of Wilson Fybrids below that (usually a 3 or 5 wood, 19.5 Fybrid, and then a 3 or 4 hybrid), and then use the Di9 5-GW, and usually a 56* SW.  

But again, as alluded to, when I'm on the course, I just play and don't get too hung up on what clubs or lofts I have.  There are many times that I reach for my 46* AW, and then many times where I am closer to the pin and reach for my 49.5* GW.  And since the Di9s are very forgiving, those 2 clubs are quite versatile.

Wilson also has a "fitting" system that will take some basic info and recommend a 12-club set to complement a driver and putter.  It is a simple guide to help compile a 14-club set.

http://www.wilson.co.../us/GetFit.html


The Di9's seem to be even stronger and thus almost exaclty 1 club stronger in loft than some others. I guess it really comes down to just knowing how far you hit each club and not thinking about the number at all.

Here is the club scenario I came up with if I go with the Di7's.

4 hybrid = 22* (non wilson)
5 iron = 25.5*
6 iron = 28.5*
7 iron = 31.5*
8 iron = 35*
9 iron = 39*
PW = 44* (43* bent 1* weak)
GW = 49*
SW = 54* (non wilson)

LW = 58* - 60* if and when I need it (non wilson)

We're not here for a long time,
just a good time.

#14 petter7

petter7

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,420 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 8005
  • Joined: 11/21/2005
  • Location:Florida
GolfWRX Likes : 42

Posted 01 November 2010 - 03:46 PM

 kloyd0306, on 31 October 2010 - 07:51 PM, said:

Six degree jumps from the PW to the GW and GW to SW.
Makes a mockery of actually giving each club a number doesn' t it?
You are going to need four or five wedges.......
Ridiculous!

I depends on the player when it comes to the wedges.

My GW is 50* and my SW is 58*.

I use the SW for many different kinds of shots, mostly close to the green. With the grind I have
I don't need four separate wedges with evenly spaced lofts to hit a wide variety of shots I need
around the green, including pitches and 3/4 shots up to 80 yards. The one club along with my
ability level works well.

My GW has a grind on it that allows me to use it as well as a 54* wedge for anything I might need
close to the green, but, I like having the loft more closely related to my 46* PW because I hit more
full shots with it than anything. Any partial shots I may be confronted with between the SW and GW
I have no problem dealing with. Again, it has a lot to do with skill level and what is needed on the
course.

To the OP, adding a degree of loft to irons can definitely be beneficial, especially if a player needs
a bit more trajectory and spin. I have done this many times, especially with present day clubs that
tend to be strong lofted from the get-go. One thing is for sure, making sure your lofts and lies suit
your swing and ball flight preference is vital.

#15 pappaf2

pappaf2

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,273 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 99231
  • Joined: 11/26/2009
  • Location:Bay Area, CA
GolfWRX Likes : 92

Posted 01 November 2010 - 05:13 PM

Well I called around to a couple places and none of them will bend a wilson with a fat shaft. I guess I did all that thinking for nothing! :beruo:

Edited by pappaf2, 01 November 2010 - 05:13 PM.

We're not here for a long time,
just a good time.

#16 professor_doom

professor_doom

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 543 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 103897
  • Joined: 02/24/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 10

Posted 01 November 2010 - 07:30 PM

First of all, ignore the number on the sole of the club.  It means as much as the number printed on the ball.  I like the way Tommy Armour (and Titleist, I believe) used to actually stamp the lofts on their clubs--if manufacturers had done that from the get-go, the jacked-up loft phenomenon never would have happened.

Why would the designer space lofts closer together at the least likely yardages, at the expense of huge gaps at the most likely yardages (and greenside options)?  No matter who you are or what your handicap is, most shots happen from 120 in.  The standard lofts sound downright insane.

I feel like you could replace the 5 and 6 iron with a single club with either 27 or 27.5* loft (or 27.25 if your club-fitter can get that accurate) and barely give up anything in terms of yardage gaps--it would actually fall very close to the 4* gaps that seem to have suited golfers just fine for the past century or so.  Probably easiest to bend the 5-iron weak, cut the shaft down a quarter inch to split the difference, and grind down the bounce (since bending a club weak increases the bounce by the same number of degrees) if you need to.

This would free up a spot in the bag--my thoughts would be bend the stock gap wedge to 51* (yielding a little more bounce) and have something akin to Cleveland's "dual wedge"--an awesome weapon for shots out of thicker grass and longer bunker shots that's still good from the fairway.  This would let you pick up a 47* wedge that you could use as an actual PITCHING wedge (i.e. a wedge you can make pitch shots with).  If you want to stick with Wilson, the new FG tour wedges coming out next year look AMAZING, and they probably play as good as they look.  Or you could probably pick up a pi5 PW somewhere online for dirt cheap--I believe that set had a 47* PW.  The PW that came with your set would effectively be your "10 iron"--simply the most lofted iron in your bag.

All told, you'd wind up paying for 1 iron you don't play (but I guess you could practice with it to save wear on the others, or switch it back in to the bag depending on what course you're playing) and 1 extra wedge, and paying to have 2 clubs adjusted instead of the entire set.

Of course, anyone who borrowed your set without knowing the changes you had made would think you were nuts playing with two pitching wedges and no 6-iron.

#17 RobStAndrews

RobStAndrews

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 115111
  • Joined: 09/19/2010
  • Location:Buffalo, NY
GolfWRX Likes : 0

Posted 16 November 2010 - 09:26 AM

 petter7, on 01 November 2010 - 03:46 PM, said:

 kloyd0306, on 31 October 2010 - 07:51 PM, said:

Six degree jumps from the PW to the GW and GW to SW.
Makes a mockery of actually giving each club a number doesn' t it?
You are going to need four or five wedges.......
Ridiculous!

I depends on the player when it comes to the wedges.

My GW is 50* and my SW is 58*.

I use the SW for many different kinds of shots, mostly close to the green. With the grind I have
I don't need four separate wedges with evenly spaced lofts to hit a wide variety of shots I need
around the green, including pitches and 3/4 shots up to 80 yards. The one club along with my
ability level works well.

My GW has a grind on it that allows me to use it as well as a 54* wedge for anything I might need
close to the green, but, I like having the loft more closely related to my 46* PW because I hit more
full shots with it than anything. Any partial shots I may be confronted with between the SW and GW
I have no problem dealing with. Again, it has a lot to do with skill level and what is needed on the
course.


You have the same philosophy I do when it comes with wedges. I used to carry a 50, 54, and 58 but realized I used my 50 for 75-120 yard pitches and my 58 for 40-80 yard pitches plus any chip or sand shot I needed. Never touched my 54, so out it came. I added a TEE 4W for killer shots off the fairway and dropped strokes on my handicap to boot!

#18 ttm27

ttm27

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 371 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 107577
  • Joined: 05/08/2010
  • Location:MARYLAND
  • Ebay ID:terps2703
GolfWRX Likes : 13

Posted 18 January 2011 - 10:18 AM

Very interesting thread as I have been debating this same idea with my Di9's.  I carry a 4 hybrid, and then Di9 5,6,7,8,9,PW,AW,GW, a 54 and a LW.  That only leaves room for the driver, putter and a 5 wood.  I want to add a 3 wood for those days when my driver is all over the place.  I considered bending (now I know it can't be done with these fat shafts) the PW to 44 degrees and taking out the 46 degree AW.  One option I thought of was using a Ci7 PW which is 44 degrees.  Is that an insane idea to have one random iron not match the rest of the set?  Other thing I thought of is buying a 4 wood instead of carrying a 3 and a 5 wood.  I sort of like the idea in the previous post too about dropping the 54 degree and just playing the 58 around the greens and bunkers.  Would welcome and comments or ideas...
Ping K15 w/ TFC 707D Stiff
Ping K15 3 wood w/TFC 189 Tour Stiff
Ping G25 20*/23* Hybrids w/TFC 189 Stif
Callaway Apex 5-AW w/Recoil F4
Eidolon 54*, Vokey 60*
Spider S Counterbalanced




1 user(s) are reading this topic

1 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


    Audioghost

GolfWRX Sponsors