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Birdie, Eagle, Albatross OK; but Condor and Ostrich?


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#1 Mainlinegolfer

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 11:29 AM

Now I've only been playing golf for 45 years.  I admit I'm not as good a player as some on GolfWRX and don't know as much about golf rules and history as some.  HOWEVER, in researching something else, I came across the terms "Condor" and "Ostrich" in Wikipedia-Golf.  The article claims "common scores for a hole also have specific terms" and mentions the usual suspects, bogey, par, birdie, eagle, etc.

However, while I've had a few birdies and eagles (and bogeys and double/triple bogeys) in my life; and even seen an albatross (double eagle) on TV, I have to admit I have never witnessed, or even ever heard of the terms "Condor" (4 under par) and "Ostrich" (5 under par).

I assume these would be fairly difficult to achieve and, therefore, rather rare?  I'm not sure I've ever witnessed a "hole in zero" because I'm pretty sure I'd remember it (even at an advanced age).  Perhaps there are more holes with par greater than five than I am aware of and someone achieved a hole in one (or two) to result in a condor or ostrich.

Maybe not.

Edited by Mainlinegolfer, 01 September 2010 - 11:31 AM.


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#2 littlepingman

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 11:34 AM

I'd be careful believing things you read on wikipedia.

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#3 Mainlinegolfer

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 11:37 AM

View Postlittlepingman, on 01 September 2010 - 11:34 AM, said:

I'd be careful believing things you read on wikipedia.
Really?  I read things on GolfWRX.  Are some things posted on the Internet not accurate?

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#4 littlepingman

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 11:41 AM

View PostMainlinegolfer, on 01 September 2010 - 11:37 AM, said:

View Postlittlepingman, on 01 September 2010 - 11:34 AM, said:

I'd be careful believing things you read on wikipedia.
Really?  I read things on GolfWRX.  Are some things posted on the Internet not accurate?

I'd be even more careful believing things that are posted on GolfWRX... :)

Edited by littlepingman, 01 September 2010 - 11:41 AM.


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#5 Mainlinegolfer

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 11:54 AM

View Postlittlepingman, on 01 September 2010 - 11:41 AM, said:

View PostMainlinegolfer, on 01 September 2010 - 11:37 AM, said:

View Postlittlepingman, on 01 September 2010 - 11:34 AM, said:

I'd be careful believing things you read on wikipedia.
Really?  I read things on GolfWRX.  Are some things posted on the Internet not accurate?

I'd be even more careful believing things that are posted on GolfWRX... :)
I am shocked...SHOCKED!

Anyway, back to the OP.


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#6 WichitaDuffer

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 05:04 AM

I have seen one or two par 6 holes, but you would have to be the Hulk with the brand new Taylormade R-Howitzer to reach the green in 2 on them, much less hole it out.

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#7 Mainlinegolfer

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 07:25 AM

I may be the only one intrigued with these terms because, despite having played golf for a long time, I had never heard of a "condor" or an "ostrich".  I Googled and found this on WikiAnswers:

Condor
Yes, it's happened at least several times.

Since almost nobody - even with today's supercharged equipment - can hit a 500-yard drive, the best place to look for par-5 aces are on those par-5 holes that are severe doglegs, or are even a bit horseshoe-shaped. On such holes, an intrepid long-hitter can attempt to cut a corner or clear trees or other hazards in order to go straight at the green, rather than playing around the dogleg in a normal fashion.

Holes-in-one on two such par-5s are known to have happened. One was even recorded with a 3-iron! That one was made by Shaun Lynch, playing at Teign Valley Golf Club in Christow, England, in 1995, on the 496-yard No. 17. According to a 2004 article in Golf World magazine, Lynch aimed straight toward the green on a horseshoe par-5, clearing a 20-foot-high hedge, then hitting a downslope on the other side.

The downslope carried his ball to the green and into the cup.

The first-known ace of this nature occurred in 1962, according to the Golf World article. "Larry Bruce took his drive over a stand of scrawny pines on the 480-yard dogleg right par-5 fifth hole at Hope Country Club" in Arkansas, and found the cup.

But there's also one hole-in-one known to have occurred on a straightaway par-5. This monster drive was achieved at altitude on the No. 9 hole at Green Valley Ranch Golf Club in Denver in 2002. The shot was 517 yards in length, and the golfer who got the ace was Mike Crean. This ace is believed to be the longest ever recorded. According to Matt Dribnak, Director of Sales and Marketing at the GVRGC, the hole-in-one was not witnessed, so according to the USGA this cannot be recognized as a hole-in-one.

What is a hole-in-one on a par-5 called? "Condor" is sometimes recognized as the "proper" term, but triple-eagle and double-albatross are also correct.



Remember, I'm only the messenger.

Edited by Mainlinegolfer, 07 September 2010 - 07:26 AM.


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#8 profsmitty

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 06:38 PM

Hole in zero. Would that be "missing the ball and sinking th divot"?

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#9 ckay

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:13 PM

As a kid, I would order a Guiness Book of World Records when the Scholastic Book catalogs were given out in grammar school.  I would always see if any new records were set for aces.  I remember reading about a few Par 5 Aces so they do exist.
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Taylormade M2 Tour 16.5* Atmos Blue 7x
Taylormade M2 L.I.F.T. 2 KBS Hybrid Proto 85x
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#10 ahl3bomber

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 10:22 PM

View Postsmith5606, on 07 September 2010 - 06:38 PM, said:

Hole in zero. Would that be "missing the ball and sinking th divot"?

I think it could be "net" rather than gross...like an albatross when he was getting two strokes is a 2 for a 0.... or a net ostrich
a hole in one on a par 6 (although uncommon) is also an ostich


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#11 Mainlinegolfer

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 07:28 AM

View Postahl3bomber, on 07 September 2010 - 10:22 PM, said:

View Postsmith5606, on 07 September 2010 - 06:38 PM, said:

Hole in zero. Would that be "missing the ball and sinking th divot"?

I think it could be "net" rather than gross...like an albatross when he was getting two strokes is a 2 for a 0.... or a net ostrich
a hole in one on a par 6 (although uncommon) is also an ostich
I thought of "net" scores too.  However,

I've had a hole in one.
I've seen a hole in one.
In net tournaments, I've even been the victim of a 2, net 0.

BUT, a 3, net 1, is NOT a "hole in one" (nor is it an "ace" or "eagle"), IMHO.

Edited by Mainlinegolfer, 08 September 2010 - 07:36 AM.


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#12 chughes60

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 01:09 PM

View PostMainlinegolfer, on 01 September 2010 - 11:29 AM, said:

Now I've only been playing golf for 45 years.  I admit I'm not as good a player as some on GolfWRX and don't know as much about golf rules and history as some.  HOWEVER, in researching something else, I came across the terms "Condor" and "Ostrich" in Wikipedia-Golf.  The article claims "common scores for a hole also have specific terms" and mentions the usual suspects, bogey, par, birdie, eagle, etc.

However, while I've had a few birdies and eagles (and bogeys and double/triple bogeys) in my life; and even seen an albatross (double eagle) on TV, I have to admit I have never witnessed, or even ever heard of the terms "Condor" (4 under par) and "Ostrich" (5 under par).

I assume these would be fairly difficult to achieve and, therefore, rather rare?  I'm not sure I've ever witnessed a "hole in zero" because I'm pretty sure I'd remember it (even at an advanced age).  Perhaps there are more holes with par greater than five than I am aware of and someone achieved a hole in one (or two) to result in a condor or ostrich.

Maybe not.
I beleive the supreme ruler of north Korea, Kim Jong Ill has made several birdies and condors since he sets the par # and then after he hits they cut the hole where his ball ends up.  That was back when he was an avid golfer in good health.

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#13 maverick

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:01 PM

View Postchughes60, on 28 September 2010 - 01:09 PM, said:

View PostMainlinegolfer, on 01 September 2010 - 11:29 AM, said:

Now I've only been playing golf for 45 years.  I admit I'm not as good a player as some on GolfWRX and don't know as much about golf rules and history as some.  HOWEVER, in researching something else, I came across the terms "Condor" and "Ostrich" in Wikipedia-Golf.  The article claims "common scores for a hole also have specific terms" and mentions the usual suspects, bogey, par, birdie, eagle, etc.

However, while I've had a few birdies and eagles (and bogeys and double/triple bogeys) in my life; and even seen an albatross (double eagle) on TV, I have to admit I have never witnessed, or even ever heard of the terms "Condor" (4 under par) and "Ostrich" (5 under par).

I assume these would be fairly difficult to achieve and, therefore, rather rare?  I'm not sure I've ever witnessed a "hole in zero" because I'm pretty sure I'd remember it (even at an advanced age).  Perhaps there are more holes with par greater than five than I am aware of and someone achieved a hole in one (or two) to result in a condor or ostrich.

Maybe not.
I beleive the supreme ruler of north Korea, Kim Jong Ill has made several birdies and condors since he sets the par # and then after he hits they cut the hole where his ball ends up.  That was back when he was an avid golfer in good health.

This is why I NEVER depend on Wikipedia. The "information" is put in by anyone. =) Maverick

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#14 HeadonaStick

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 07:10 PM

There are par 6 holes and the USGA recommends par 6 for holes over 691 yards in length.

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#15 dillyNZ

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 06:07 PM

I had this question regarding an ace on a par 5 popup in a trivia game & the answer was infact a condor.I have never heard of the term Ostrich tho,handy one to know.


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#16 mat562

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 07:08 PM

Four under is also known as a 'vulture' in my part of the world. 

A handicap-assisted vulture has been scored at least once in club events at my old place. The 7th hole is a reachable par 5 of around 500 yards with a questionable stroke index that doles out a stroke to high single figure handicappers, some of whom can be expected to clonk it up to the green side in two shots every once in a while when the wind's behind. I can remember hearing about a bloke going one better, holing his second shot with a 4-wood or something and scoring a net one. In the 19th, as a soft drink-quaffing teenager, I discovered that such a score was termed a vulture.






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#17 Mainlinegolfer

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 07:17 PM

View Postmat562, on 19 October 2010 - 07:08 PM, said:

Four under is also known as a 'vulture' in my part of the world. 

A handicap-assisted vulture has been scored at least once in club events at my old place. The 7th hole is a reachable par 5 of around 500 yards with a questionable stroke index that doles out a stroke to high single figure handicappers, some of whom can be expected to clonk it up to the green side in two shots every once in a while when the wind's behind. I can remember hearing about a bloke going one better, holing his second shot with a 4-wood or something and scoring a net one. In the 19th, as a soft drink-quaffing teenager, I discovered that such a score was termed a vulture.
As wrote above, something achieved with the assistance of handicap strokes isn't really a birdie, or eagle (is a 3, net 1 a "hole in one"?).

Despite 40+ years of golf, I'd never heard of a condor or ostrich.  "Vulture" is also new to me; but it seems more appropriate to call the player a vulture, not the score.

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#18 mat562

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    My ex had an irrational phobia of salad cream. Honestly.

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 07:37 PM

The true vultures at my club are the ones who come out of the woodwork whenever they get wind of a hole-in-one on Medal day and just happen to be in the bar when the maker of the ace is walking in for a post-round pint.

For what it's worth, I agree with you about the handicap thing. But since the only people claiming such feats (miraculous, wind-assisted clouts aside) as vultures/condors and ostriches are presumably off 28 handicaps, I say let them have their moment in the limelight. I'd need an occasional boost in my morale if I was shooting 100-odd every time I played and getting two strokes on par fives.

As far as the daft ones are concerned (e.g. 'net aces') I can't imagine even the most desperate-for-a-hole-in-one golfer would stoop so low. Would they?

Edited by mat562, 19 October 2010 - 07:49 PM.


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#19 BogeyDog11

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Posted 19 October 2010 - 08:30 PM

I played with a guy today who made a "turkey" just like in bowling.  Three is a row......birdies of course.

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