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Where is the best competition for junior golf?


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#31 CTgolf

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 08:45 AM

View Postyellowlover519, on 03 January 2019 - 07:29 PM, said:

View Postjj9000, on 03 January 2019 - 06:47 PM, said:

View Postyellowlover519, on 03 January 2019 - 06:02 PM, said:

Also - instruction/facilities are pretty irrelevant; it's  not like most people will pay for "top" rated instructors or belong to the top country clubs.  The real reason why more pros/ junior golfers come out of FL, TX and CA is bc a greater number of parents/children are willing to go all in on golf - even if that means huge sacrifices, including academics.  Not just being a 4.0 student at some small obscure town, but really being able to have the same academic foundation to go to a top college and succeed at such institution (you just wouldn't have the time to practice golf as much as it takes to be a top junior and study).  Forget all the other social sacrifices.  Because you have more "all in" players, you have much better competition locally, which I do believe is a key ingredient to becoming an elite junior golfer.  The reality is that you have a better chance of making millions in finance than becoming a professional athlete.  If you were to expend similar hours on academics as some of these parents do in golf, you would have an easier road to a top university, followed by a big-bank job, followed by a private equity gig.

I disagree with the theory of 'all-in' parents in TX/FL/CA being the driver for more top golfers coming from these states, in comparison to the Tri-State area.

Set parenting aside for a moment.  Being able to play golf 12 months per year...every year...is likely a bigger contributor.

Didn't the recent junior am champion come from MA?  

Michael Thorbjornsen (#9 overall JGS) does come from MA, but I believe he attends IMG in FL


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#32 GolfSRQ

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Posted 05 January 2019 - 06:21 PM

View Postjj9000, on 03 January 2019 - 06:47 PM, said:

View Postyellowlover519, on 03 January 2019 - 06:02 PM, said:

Also - instruction/facilities are pretty irrelevant; it’s  not like most people will pay for “top” rated instructors or belong to the top country clubs.  The real reason why more pros/ junior golfers come out of FL, TX and CA is bc a greater number of parents/children are willing to go all in on golf - even if that means huge sacrifices, including academics.  Not just being a 4.0 student at some small obscure town, but really being able to have the same academic foundation to go to a top college and succeed at such institution (you just wouldn’t have the time to practice golf as much as it takes to be a top junior and study).  Forget all the other social sacrifices.  Because you have more “all in” players, you have much better competition locally, which I do believe is a key ingredient to becoming an elite junior golfer.  The reality is that you have a better chance of making millions in finance than becoming a professional athlete.  If you were to expend similar hours on academics as some of these parents do in golf, you would have an easier road to a top university, followed by a big-bank job, followed by a private equity gig.

I disagree with the theory of 'all-in' parents in TX/FL/CA being the driver for more top golfers coming from these states, in comparison to the Tri-State area.

Set parenting aside for a moment.  Being able to play golf 12 months per year...every year...is likely a bigger contributor.
It’s being able to play all year.  Same 3 states also produce far more 4 and 5 star football recruits than anywhere else.
I grew up in NJ and moved to FL.  Parents are more competitive / intense in NJ than here in FL.  Down here you  can play all the time. It makes a big difference for all outdoor sports

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#33 TigerMom

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 10:29 AM

View Postyellowlover519, on 03 January 2019 - 07:29 PM, said:

View Postjj9000, on 03 January 2019 - 06:47 PM, said:

View Postyellowlover519, on 03 January 2019 - 06:02 PM, said:

Also - instruction/facilities are pretty irrelevant; it's  not like most people will pay for "top" rated instructors or belong to the top country clubs.  The real reason why more pros/ junior golfers come out of FL, TX and CA is bc a greater number of parents/children are willing to go all in on golf - even if that means huge sacrifices, including academics.  Not just being a 4.0 student at some small obscure town, but really being able to have the same academic foundation to go to a top college and succeed at such institution (you just wouldn't have the time to practice golf as much as it takes to be a top junior and study).  Forget all the other social sacrifices.  Because you have more "all in" players, you have much better competition locally, which I do believe is a key ingredient to becoming an elite junior golfer.  The reality is that you have a better chance of making millions in finance than becoming a professional athlete.  If you were to expend similar hours on academics as some of these parents do in golf, you would have an easier road to a top university, followed by a big-bank job, followed by a private equity gig.

I disagree with the theory of 'all-in' parents in TX/FL/CA being the driver for more top golfers coming from these states, in comparison to the Tri-State area.

Set parenting aside for a moment.  Being able to play golf 12 months per year...every year...is likely a bigger contributor.

We are kind of saying the same thing.  Whether it's playing year-round golf or going all in, where you're from doesn't necessarily dictate how much golf you can get during a year.  You can travel and there are indoor practice facilities everywhere.  Didn't the recent junior am champion come from MA?  I know a kid from CT that ha finished top 5 at worlds every year since he was 6.  It's the drive of parents and/or kids to go all in.

Ultimately the kids in better climates who are able to play year-round will be closer to reaching their potential than kids who can only play 7-9 months of the year

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