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Tua Tagovailoa & Golf


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#1 hangontight

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 09:30 AM

Watching the Bama game last weekend the announcers were discussing an interview with Tua and his dad and how his parents chose what college he was going to (Alabama).  Tua said that it is a cultural thing(Hawaiian) that the parents make those kind of big decisions for their kids.  For those not familiar, this kid was one of the highest rated QB's of his HS class and had open door to almost any big school he wanted.   This caught my attention and my first impression was that it was wrong - the decision should of been his, but then they discussed how it takes the pressure off of the "kid".  It got me thinking about golf - or any other youth sport for that matter.  Generally I am of the mindset to give the kid information & options and let them choose their own path (with a healthy dose of steering guidance of course), but this got me thinking a little bit..  does an 18 year old really know what is best ?  Do they have the capacity to make decisions with lifetime implications at that age?  Looking back to when I was 18, I was pretty clueless.  Not saying I completely agree, but it got me thinking.


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#2 tiger1873

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 10:11 AM

I personally think an 18 year old is old enough to make their own decisions about their future. If they can't make a decisions on their own by that age one has to wonder how they will get through college or even hold down a job.

When it comes to golf I think most kids are very close to their parents so naturally will look to them for on major decisions.  I think most kids who were raised well will seek out their Parents advice. I also believe Parents should be a trusted source for their kids anytime they need advice or help with decisions. I don't think that ever changes doesn't matter if there 10, 18, or 50.

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#3 TigerMom

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 11:27 AM

any wise child (even older than 18) will take into account what the parents think is best in deciding

this is common sense in rest of the world

some children even want to make parent happy and will prioritize it

I'm sure many will go crazy bc I said this

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#4 kekoa

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 05:53 PM

Every family, every culture, and every kid is different.

I will tell you for sure that if I am paying for my kid's education- they will 100% go to the college that his parents recommend especially if golf is involved.  :)

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#5 BertGA

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Posted 20 November 2018 - 11:00 PM

Maybe I’m overthinking this, but can the power of the decision change based on the sport played? Relative to other heavily coached sports liked football, golf  is undercoached. We rant on here all the time about allowing kids to start making their own decisions ( club selection, green reading, etc.) at an earlier age, because eventually they will need those skills as a professional athlete. Not so in football. It seems every decision on the field is made for them. Play calling, etc.

In fact, I hear so many college football coaches talking about being a “father figure” for “his boys”. I don’t necessarily see the same relationship between golfers and their coaches.

To put it another way, I would trust golf coaches to keep my child alive for four years. Football coaches? Not so much.

Edited by BertGA, 21 November 2018 - 08:07 AM.


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#6 tiger1873

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 12:02 PM

View PostBertGA, on 20 November 2018 - 11:00 PM, said:

Maybe I'm overthinking this, but can the power of the decision change based on the sport played? Relative to other heavily coached sports liked football, golf  is undercoached. We rant on here all the time about allowing kids to start making their own decisions ( club selection, green reading, etc.) at an earlier age, because eventually they will need those skills as a professional athlete. Not so in football. It seems every decision on the field is made for them. Play calling, etc.

In fact, I hear so many college football coaches talking about being a "father figure" for "his boys". I don't necessarily see the same relationship between golfers and their coaches.

To put it another way, I would trust golf coaches to keep my child alive for four years. Football coaches? Not so much.

Football is completely different game and so is most team sports. In golf a coach is just there for advice. When they get older there is a good chance the golfer will fire their coach or caddie if something goes wrong. What people forget is there viewed a payed staff at higher levels. In team sports such as football at a high level the coach is the Boss much like any else's boss. Pretty much any individual sport it is the same way.

If you don't admire or respect your boss then there is a good chance your going be in trouble.  I think a lot college golfers also don't understand the relationship either with the college coaches and a lot kids throw away great opportunities thinking they will be better off turning pro early.

Edited by tiger1873, 21 November 2018 - 12:11 PM.


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#7 BertGA

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Posted 21 November 2018 - 05:31 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 21 November 2018 - 12:02 PM, said:

View PostBertGA, on 20 November 2018 - 11:00 PM, said:

Maybe I'm overthinking this, but can the power of the decision change based on the sport played? Relative to other heavily coached sports liked football, golf  is undercoached. We rant on here all the time about allowing kids to start making their own decisions ( club selection, green reading, etc.) at an earlier age, because eventually they will need those skills as a professional athlete. Not so in football. It seems every decision on the field is made for them. Play calling, etc.

In fact, I hear so many college football coaches talking about being a "father figure" for "his boys". I don't necessarily see the same relationship between golfers and their coaches.

To put it another way, I would trust golf coaches to keep my child alive for four years. Football coaches? Not so much.

Football is completely different game and so is most team sports. In golf a coach is just there for advice. When they get older there is a good chance the golfer will fire their coach or caddie if something goes wrong. What people forget is there viewed a payed staff at higher levels. In team sports such as football at a high level the coach is the Boss much like any else's boss. Pretty much any individual sport it is the same way.

If you don't admire or respect your boss then there is a good chance your going be in trouble.  I think a lot college golfers also don't understand the relationship either with the college coaches and a lot kids throw away great opportunities thinking they will be better off turning pro early.

I understand it isi a different sport, which was the point of my post. I don’t think you can apply the strategies of a football parent to those of a golf parent when it comes to recruitment.

All too often I hear football coaches talk about how they are recruiting the parents, not the child, multiple visits to the home, talking about how they will raise a man, etc. etc.

The little I have seen regarding golf coaches, it seems they encourage the athlete to connect and correspond with the coach, and be the primary contact during the recruitment process. Obviously parents are involved,  but from what I can tell the primary recruitment contact is between coach and athlete, not coach and parents. Obviously others around here could correct this misperception if I am wrong.

For my money, it’s my daughter that will be making the sacrifices and putting in the hard work. It needs to be her choice, but of course I won’t let her make a huge mistake.

Edited by BertGA, 21 November 2018 - 05:32 PM.


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