Jump to content

Welcome. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with members, access to all forums and eligiblility to win free giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

Red shirting


95 replies to this topic

#31 Shades234

Shades234

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 194 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 446016
  • Joined: 11/08/2016
  • Location:San Diego
  • Handicap:0.3
GolfWRX Likes : 67

Posted 24 October 2018 - 05:58 PM

View PostBrianMcG, on 24 October 2018 - 01:38 PM, said:

I wished I had been red shirted. Not for sports or anything. It's just all the girls were always taller than me until my senior year in high school. Lol.

My buddy was a 17 with a bone age of 14 in the spring of his junior year. Both of his parents were tall but he wasn't. He grew 5 inches that summer and then he was tall. That's life. lol


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


1

#32 CTgolf

CTgolf

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 345 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 124521
  • Joined: 03/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 235

Posted 25 October 2018 - 07:08 AM

seems to have worked for the Duke football player profiled on ESPN's Outside the Lines:

http://www.espn.com/...lip?id=12908163

2

#33 Tannerbug33

Tannerbug33

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 78 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 464346
  • Joined: 04/20/2017
  • Location:Gainesville, Ga
GolfWRX Likes : 62

Posted 25 October 2018 - 09:53 AM

I've scene it a lot in football. Recently saw a dad hold back his honor student in middle school so everyone knew what was going on.
He recently graduated and is not playing football.
I would be super excited of if my som played college golf. But I am not gambling on those odds. We work hard at golf but also other things so hopefully he's a well rounded adult

3

#34 JDee1935

JDee1935

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 288765
  • Joined: 12/23/2013
  • Location:Pinehurst NC
  • Handicap:2
GolfWRX Likes : 7

Posted 03 November 2018 - 01:31 PM

View PostTigerMom, on 24 October 2018 - 02:09 AM, said:

I heard some parents talk about holding back their kid or starting Kindergarten a year late

They called it red shirting

They said it would definitely give kids an advantage in sports in high school

Kids will be bigger and stronger being up to a year older

No real impact on academics

Would it make a big difference in golf too?

What do you think?
Red Shirting, is going to college and receiving scholarship for 5 years, to complete 4. Some players are held back freshman year, and/or injured 1 year. You do not see it too often w/Girls golf, more w/men. That being said, the NCAA , in 2018, changed their visitation w/interaction at colleges until a players junior year. In 2019, the NCAA is going to eliminate early commitments until junior year. Both moves, while great for D-1 basketball or football, really are going to harm players from individual sports.

As an example, the girls class of 2020, is strongest in USA history, up to 100 D-1 players. Yet, the 2021 & 22 classes, are very weak and players like Zhang, Pano and Avery should not commit until very late in the process.Yet, some players who have, before rule change, stand a good shot at not having a scholarship available if they do not improve greatly.

Same w/the guys. There are many, who gave verbal commitments [ which mean zero] to major D-1 schools at 12 or 13. Hope their parents keep honest eye on their progress.

So, bottom line, is holding player back , CAN be a good thing, but must be done prior to grade 9. And, you really need to have very accurate assessment of the strength of that class. JGS, is not accurate, WAGR, AJGA, or Golfweek ranking are much much better. to assess.

4

#35 raynorfan1

raynorfan1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,206 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 119065
  • Joined: 12/17/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 1760

Posted 03 November 2018 - 02:53 PM

View PostNoles, on 24 October 2018 - 07:43 AM, said:

I teach in an elementary school and it is a huge advantage academically for the kids who are the older ones in each grade.  Especially K-2.  I can spot right away the ones who barely made the birthday cutoff and they are almost always behind the average students.

At the same time, it's incredibly difficult to be the parent of a younger kid in Kindergarten who is being compared with kids, in some cases, almost two full years older than they are. We have an entire (private) school near us where they've re-defined Kindergarten to be for six and seven year olds...


5

#36 LeoLeo99

LeoLeo99

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,476 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 326383
  • Joined: 07/12/2014
GolfWRX Likes : 2150

Posted 03 November 2018 - 09:03 PM

My kids are grown, now.  But I wouldn't imagine holding them back for some perceived benefit at a young age.  You don't want your kids to peak at 12 years old.  The way schools in my area work, there are cutoffs for kindergarten and a couple bubble months.  If the kids are mature enough, they go to K.  If not, they stay home and go the next year.  Maybe if my kid was on the bubble and I thought them immature, I'd consider holding them back, but not under other circumstances.  And only for academic reasons.

6

#37 leftyDH04

leftyDH04

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 364 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 514716
  • Joined: 10/19/2018
GolfWRX Likes : 212

Posted 03 November 2018 - 09:07 PM

No real effect on academics?

That's the line I'd question.

7

#38 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 777 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 362

Posted 04 November 2018 - 08:21 AM

Holding back kids to gain an advantage will hurt them just as much as moving them up too fast.

School grades are based on academics if you take a good student and hold them back and they will lose interest in school.  Same thing if you take a really smart kid and throw them in high school when they should be in middle school. Both will suffer.

Edited by tiger1873, 04 November 2018 - 08:23 AM.


8

#39 TigerMom

TigerMom

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 164 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 504874
  • Joined: 06/16/2018
GolfWRX Likes : 103

Posted 05 November 2018 - 01:01 AM

View PostleftyDH04, on 03 November 2018 - 09:07 PM, said:

No real effect on academics?

That's the line I'd question.

There is one kid who took a year off before high school and trained in famous tennis academy

Did some distance learning courses and SAT prep during that year

Went back home the next year and resumed in the grade below his normal classmates

He ended up at school of his choice playing tennis and parents said he was better prepared academically and stronger player

9

#40 Tannerbug33

Tannerbug33

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 78 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 464346
  • Joined: 04/20/2017
  • Location:Gainesville, Ga
GolfWRX Likes : 62

Posted 05 November 2018 - 07:28 AM

View PostTigerMom, on 05 November 2018 - 01:01 AM, said:

View PostleftyDH04, on 03 November 2018 - 09:07 PM, said:

No real effect on academics?

That's the line I'd question.

There is one kid who took a year off before high school and trained in famous tennis academy

Did some distance learning courses and SAT prep during that year

Went back home the next year and resumed in the grade below his normal classmates

He ended up at school of his choice playing tennis and parents said he was better prepared academically and stronger player


But what's the percentage of this being affective. There is always that guy who wins the lottery. And millions who don't.
Making it as a professional athlete is a long shot. Why would you gamble there education on that.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


10

#41 Noles

Noles

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,297 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 136360
  • Joined: 08/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 394

Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:17 AM

View Postraynorfan1, on 03 November 2018 - 02:53 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 24 October 2018 - 07:43 AM, said:

I teach in an elementary school and it is a huge advantage academically for the kids who are the older ones in each grade.  Especially K-2.  I can spot right away the ones who barely made the birthday cutoff and they are almost always behind the average students.

At the same time, it's incredibly difficult to be the parent of a younger kid in Kindergarten who is being compared with kids, in some cases, almost two full years older than they are. We have an entire (private) school near us where they've re-defined Kindergarten to be for six and seven year olds...
Not sure where you are located or what it is like in those schools, but in this area education is completely standards based and data driven.  Kids are not compared to each other like when I went to school.  A student's performance on standardized tests is more important than ever.  Teachers are required to have data to back up every decision they make.  Education is as individualizes as it has ever been.

11

#42 Noles

Noles

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,297 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 136360
  • Joined: 08/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 394

Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:18 AM

View Posttiger1873, on 04 November 2018 - 08:21 AM, said:

if you take a good student and hold them back and they will lose interest in school.  Same thing if you take a really smart kid and throw them in high school when they should be in middle school. Both will suffer.

If only things were this black and white.  Parenting would be easier.

12

#43 Noles

Noles

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,297 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 136360
  • Joined: 08/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 394

Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:21 AM

View PostTannerbug33, on 05 November 2018 - 07:28 AM, said:

View PostTigerMom, on 05 November 2018 - 01:01 AM, said:

View PostleftyDH04, on 03 November 2018 - 09:07 PM, said:

No real effect on academics?

That's the line I'd question.

There is one kid who took a year off before high school and trained in famous tennis academy

Did some distance learning courses and SAT prep during that year

Went back home the next year and resumed in the grade below his normal classmates

He ended up at school of his choice playing tennis and parents said he was better prepared academically and stronger player


But what's the percentage of this being affective. There is always that guy who wins the lottery. And millions who don't.
Making it as a professional athlete is a long shot. Why would you gamble there education on that.
How is that gambling their education?

13

#44 Sixcat

Sixcat

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,298 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 23189
  • Joined: 12/28/2006
  • Location:SWVA
GolfWRX Likes : 1023

Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:32 AM

"Red-shirting" is a common practice at my daughter's high school.  Kids who didn't begin school at a later age are often asked to repeat 7th grade or 8th grade.  It's such a common practice, 31 kids who have been a year ahead of my daughter since kindergarten are now in 8th grade with her.  She was already one of the youngest in her class given a July birthday and she began school at age 5.  Now, she's a year-and-a-half younger than many of her classmates.  

I don't buy into the benefits.  It's been my experience, the younger kids advance faster and reach higher athletic achievement when having to keep up with the older kids.  Not only do they keep up, they often overtake the older kids by high school.

It's not something I would ever do for my own children.

14

#45 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 777 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 362

Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:39 AM

View PostTannerbug33, on 05 November 2018 - 07:28 AM, said:

View PostTigerMom, on 05 November 2018 - 01:01 AM, said:

View PostleftyDH04, on 03 November 2018 - 09:07 PM, said:

No real effect on academics?

That's the line I'd question.

There is one kid who took a year off before high school and trained in famous tennis academy

Did some distance learning courses and SAT prep during that year

Went back home the next year and resumed in the grade below his normal classmates

He ended up at school of his choice playing tennis and parents said he was better prepared academically and stronger player


But what's the percentage of this being affective. There is always that guy who wins the lottery. And millions who don't.
Making it as a professional athlete is a long shot. Why would you gamble there education on that.

Being a professional Athlete is not always a gamble for all kids. I have known many many people who knew there kids were going to be  a Pro football or Baseball player at a young age and indeed they did become top players in their sport.  In one case is was so obvious NFL Scouts were coming to high school football games and commenting how well he played.  

The thing is even the kids who never made pro actually become successful too because people like being around people who played sports at a high level and plenty of CEO's and Executives got their foot in the door because they played sports in College or a high level amateur events. Not only that they can relate to people as well.  I  have also seen harvard graduates who were very smart but couldn't get a job either and basically a miserable person.

Edited by tiger1873, 05 November 2018 - 08:42 AM.


15

#46 raynorfan1

raynorfan1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,206 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 119065
  • Joined: 12/17/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 1760

Posted 05 November 2018 - 08:51 AM

View PostNoles, on 05 November 2018 - 08:17 AM, said:

View Postraynorfan1, on 03 November 2018 - 02:53 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 24 October 2018 - 07:43 AM, said:

I teach in an elementary school and it is a huge advantage academically for the kids who are the older ones in each grade.  Especially K-2.  I can spot right away the ones who barely made the birthday cutoff and they are almost always behind the average students.

At the same time, it's incredibly difficult to be the parent of a younger kid in Kindergarten who is being compared with kids, in some cases, almost two full years older than they are. We have an entire (private) school near us where they've re-defined Kindergarten to be for six and seven year olds...
Not sure where you are located or what it is like in those schools, but in this area education is completely standards based and data driven.  Kids are not compared to each other like when I went to school.  A student's performance on standardized tests is more important than ever.  Teachers are required to have data to back up every decision they make.  Education is as individualizes as it has ever been.

Until it comes time for college admissions. And that's where being a year (or more) older/stronger/faster/smarter really plays out and does so in subtle ways.

For sports, I would say that it's beginning to not matter as much, at least in our region. Really competitive sports are all flowing out of the schools here and into 'elite' travel leagues and teams which are age rather than school year based.

16

#47 leezer99

leezer99

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,012 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 94152
  • Joined: 09/10/2009
GolfWRX Likes : 1008

Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:00 AM

On the flip side my wife was in a combo grade in elementary school and skipped the upper grade she was in a combo with.  Ended up graduating HS the day after she turned 17 (she was 16 her entire senior year).  She is so against our kids skipping a grade that I can't even bring it up without some repercussions.  I do remember a point in time when kids skipping a grade was a thing.

As for red shirting I'd be inclined to believe there's  a tipping point where it wouldn't help.  Makes sense to me in the 3rd - 5th grades but the diminishing returns in middle or high school would seem to negate the social price they'd pay.

17

#48 Noles

Noles

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,297 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 136360
  • Joined: 08/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 394

Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM

View Postraynorfan1, on 05 November 2018 - 08:51 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 05 November 2018 - 08:17 AM, said:

View Postraynorfan1, on 03 November 2018 - 02:53 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 24 October 2018 - 07:43 AM, said:

I teach in an elementary school and it is a huge advantage academically for the kids who are the older ones in each grade.  Especially K-2.  I can spot right away the ones who barely made the birthday cutoff and they are almost always behind the average students.

At the same time, it's incredibly difficult to be the parent of a younger kid in Kindergarten who is being compared with kids, in some cases, almost two full years older than they are. We have an entire (private) school near us where they've re-defined Kindergarten to be for six and seven year olds...
Not sure where you are located or what it is like in those schools, but in this area education is completely standards based and data driven.  Kids are not compared to each other like when I went to school.  A student's performance on standardized tests is more important than ever.  Teachers are required to have data to back up every decision they make.  Education is as individualizes as it has ever been.

Until it comes time for college admissions. And that's where being a year (or more) older/stronger/faster/smarter really plays out and does so in subtle ways.

But he was speaking about Kindergarten.

18

#49 me05501

me05501

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 406 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 499624
  • Joined: 04/19/2018
  • Location:Chattanooga, TN
  • Ebay ID:mike_in_chattanooga
GolfWRX Likes : 331

Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM

Our four kids all have birthdays in the summer, so we've had a decision to make in every case.

Our second-oldest is now 22. She has a late-June birthday and was always one of the youngest people in her class. We figured she was ready for Kindergarten the first time she was old enough to go, so that's what we did. Looking back, we wish we had waited another year.

Being the youngest kid in your elementary classes is fine. Being the youngest kid in 10th or 11th grade and graduating as an immature 17-year old is not so great.

I wouldn't let athletics be a factor (none of mine are athletic anyway) but age and maturity can be good for kids throughout school. There's no stigma attached to waiting to start Kindergarten a year later, so that's probably the best time to do it.

19

#50 Sixcat

Sixcat

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,298 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 23189
  • Joined: 12/28/2006
  • Location:SWVA
GolfWRX Likes : 1023

Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:29 AM

View Postme05501, on 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM, said:

Being the youngest kid in your elementary classes is fine. Being the youngest kid in 10th or 11th grade and graduating as an immature 17-year old is not so great.

I'm entering this territory now.  My daughter ranks first in her class academically as the second youngest kid in 8th grade.  She is also one of the most mature kids in her class.  But we wonder how that might change once her classmates begin getting drivers license and she's still a year away.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


Wanna get rid of this ugly yellow box? And remove other annoying "stuff" in between posts? Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

20

#51 raynorfan1

raynorfan1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,206 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 119065
  • Joined: 12/17/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 1760

Posted 05 November 2018 - 09:43 AM

View PostNoles, on 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM, said:

View Postraynorfan1, on 05 November 2018 - 08:51 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 05 November 2018 - 08:17 AM, said:

View Postraynorfan1, on 03 November 2018 - 02:53 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 24 October 2018 - 07:43 AM, said:

I teach in an elementary school and it is a huge advantage academically for the kids who are the older ones in each grade.  Especially K-2.  I can spot right away the ones who barely made the birthday cutoff and they are almost always behind the average students.

At the same time, it's incredibly difficult to be the parent of a younger kid in Kindergarten who is being compared with kids, in some cases, almost two full years older than they are. We have an entire (private) school near us where they've re-defined Kindergarten to be for six and seven year olds...
Not sure where you are located or what it is like in those schools, but in this area education is completely standards based and data driven.  Kids are not compared to each other like when I went to school.  A student's performance on standardized tests is more important than ever.  Teachers are required to have data to back up every decision they make.  Education is as individualizes as it has ever been.

Until it comes time for college admissions. And that's where being a year (or more) older/stronger/faster/smarter really plays out and does so in subtle ways.

But he was speaking about Kindergarten.

Yes, but school goes sequentially. If you're a year older than your peers in Kindergarten, you're a year older when it comes time to apply for college.

Nobody is redshirting their kids so that they can win at dodgeball in first grade. It's so that they develop the confidence and leadership skills from consistently being "better" than their peers and learning how to deal with that.

21

#52 deadsolid...shank

deadsolid...shank

    Legend

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 11,958 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 99408
  • Joined: 11/30/2009
GolfWRX Likes : 8195

Posted 05 November 2018 - 10:05 AM

View PostSixcat, on 05 November 2018 - 08:32 AM, said:

"Red-shirting" is a common practice at my daughter's high school.  Kids who didn't begin school at a later age are often asked to repeat 7th grade or 8th grade.  It's such a common practice, 31 kids who have been a year ahead of my daughter since kindergarten are now in 8th grade with her.  She was already one of the youngest in her class given a July birthday and she began school at age 5.  Now, she's a year-and-a-half younger than many of her classmates.  

I don't buy into the benefits.  It's been my experience, the younger kids advance faster and reach higher athletic achievement when having to keep up with the older kids.  Not only do they keep up, they often overtake the older kids by high school.

It's not something I would ever do for my own children.

Was similar for our daughter. July birthday. Started at five, graduated HS at 17 (as valedictorian) and college at 21. Was too ready to not start (athletics were not a factor for her).

Would have been beneficial for my son however, sports wise. But like his sister, was ready academically. Couldn’t justify not starting him.

I did start later, six instead of five (August birthday), it definitely made a huge difference athletics wise. Didn’t help academics wise, I’m still “stoopid”!😀

Edited by deadsolid...shank, 05 November 2018 - 10:09 AM.

Titleist 910 8.5
Titleist 910 15*
Titleist 910H 17*
2-6 Mizuno MP-60, 7-PW MP-67
SC GoLo
Vokey SM5 52,58,62

22

#53 Sixcat

Sixcat

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,298 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 23189
  • Joined: 12/28/2006
  • Location:SWVA
GolfWRX Likes : 1023

Posted 05 November 2018 - 10:15 AM

View Postdeadsolid...shank, on 05 November 2018 - 10:05 AM, said:

View PostSixcat, on 05 November 2018 - 08:32 AM, said:

"Red-shirting" is a common practice at my daughter's high school.  Kids who didn't begin school at a later age are often asked to repeat 7th grade or 8th grade.  It's such a common practice, 31 kids who have been a year ahead of my daughter since kindergarten are now in 8th grade with her.  She was already one of the youngest in her class given a July birthday and she began school at age 5.  Now, she's a year-and-a-half younger than many of her classmates.  

I don't buy into the benefits.  It's been my experience, the younger kids advance faster and reach higher athletic achievement when having to keep up with the older kids.  Not only do they keep up, they often overtake the older kids by high school.

It's not something I would ever do for my own children.

Was similar for our daughter. July birthday. Started at five, graduated HS at 17 (as valedictorian) and college at 21. Was too ready to not start (athletics were not a factor for her).

Would have been beneficial for my son however, sports wise. But like his sister, was ready academically. Couldn't justify not starting him.

I did start later, six instead of five (August birthday), it definitely made a huge difference athletics wise.

Sports are not a factor for either of my kids.  My older daughter is in the high school marching band as well being a fairly accomplished guitar and mandolin player.  She will graduate high school at 17.

My younger daughter has a January birthday.  She is currently among the older kids in her 5th grade class.  By all appearances, it's commonplace for most of the athletes in the school system to be held back in 7th or 8th grade if they didn't begin kindergarten a year later.  If that happens in a couple of years, she will no longer be among the oldest.

23

#54 leezer99

leezer99

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,012 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 94152
  • Joined: 09/10/2009
GolfWRX Likes : 1008

Posted 05 November 2018 - 10:16 AM

View PostSixcat, on 05 November 2018 - 09:29 AM, said:

View Postme05501, on 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM, said:

Being the youngest kid in your elementary classes is fine. Being the youngest kid in 10th or 11th grade and graduating as an immature 17-year old is not so great.

I'm entering this territory now.  My daughter ranks first in her class academically as the second youngest kid in 8th grade.  She is also one of the most mature kids in her class.  But we wonder how that might change once her classmates begin getting drivers license and she's still a year away.

How are you going to feel when an 18 year old senior asks your 15 year old junior to prom?

24

#55 deadsolid...shank

deadsolid...shank

    Legend

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 11,958 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 99408
  • Joined: 11/30/2009
GolfWRX Likes : 8195

Posted 05 November 2018 - 10:23 AM

View Postleezer99, on 05 November 2018 - 10:16 AM, said:

View PostSixcat, on 05 November 2018 - 09:29 AM, said:

View Postme05501, on 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM, said:

Being the youngest kid in your elementary classes is fine. Being the youngest kid in 10th or 11th grade and graduating as an immature 17-year old is not so great.

I'm entering this territory now.  My daughter ranks first in her class academically as the second youngest kid in 8th grade.  She is also one of the most mature kids in her class.  But we wonder how that might change once her classmates begin getting drivers license and she's still a year away.

How are you going to feel when an 18 year old senior asks your 15 year old junior to prom?

Dad is going along?!��

Titleist 910 8.5
Titleist 910 15*
Titleist 910H 17*
2-6 Mizuno MP-60, 7-PW MP-67
SC GoLo
Vokey SM5 52,58,62

25

#56 Sixcat

Sixcat

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,298 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 23189
  • Joined: 12/28/2006
  • Location:SWVA
GolfWRX Likes : 1023

Posted 05 November 2018 - 10:35 AM

View Postleezer99, on 05 November 2018 - 10:16 AM, said:

View PostSixcat, on 05 November 2018 - 09:29 AM, said:

View Postme05501, on 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM, said:

Being the youngest kid in your elementary classes is fine. Being the youngest kid in 10th or 11th grade and graduating as an immature 17-year old is not so great.

I'm entering this territory now.  My daughter ranks first in her class academically as the second youngest kid in 8th grade.  She is also one of the most mature kids in her class.  But we wonder how that might change once her classmates begin getting drivers license and she's still a year away.

How are you going to feel when an 18 year old senior asks your 15 year old junior to prom?

Given my daughter will turn 16 in July before her junior year of high school begins, and Prom is in late spring, your scenario isn't mathematically possible!  She would be nearing 17 years of age as a high school junior at the time of Prom in May.

Nice try though!

Edited by Sixcat, 05 November 2018 - 10:35 AM.


26

#57 Sixcat

Sixcat

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,298 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 23189
  • Joined: 12/28/2006
  • Location:SWVA
GolfWRX Likes : 1023

Posted 05 November 2018 - 11:04 AM

View PostSixcat, on 05 November 2018 - 10:35 AM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 05 November 2018 - 10:16 AM, said:

View PostSixcat, on 05 November 2018 - 09:29 AM, said:

View Postme05501, on 05 November 2018 - 09:01 AM, said:

Being the youngest kid in your elementary classes is fine. Being the youngest kid in 10th or 11th grade and graduating as an immature 17-year old is not so great.

I'm entering this territory now.  My daughter ranks first in her class academically as the second youngest kid in 8th grade.  She is also one of the most mature kids in her class.  But we wonder how that might change once her classmates begin getting drivers license and she's still a year away.

How are you going to feel when an 18 year old senior asks your 15 year old junior to prom?

Given my daughter will turn 16 in July before her junior year of high school begins, and Prom is in late spring, your scenario isn't mathematically possible!  She would be nearing 17 years of age as a high school junior at the time of Prom in May.

Nice try though!

What's more likely, given the school systems penchant for "red-shirting", my daughter will be a 15 year old sophomore asked to prom by a 19 year old senior.  Given my daughter can't stand athletics in any form or fashion and is extremely musical by nature, he will likely be in band, have hair to his waist-line and wear more mascara than my daughter.  In that scenario, dad will most assuredly be chaperoning.  :taunt:

27

#58 TigerMom

TigerMom

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 164 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 504874
  • Joined: 06/16/2018
GolfWRX Likes : 103

Posted 05 November 2018 - 11:15 AM

View PostTannerbug33, on 05 November 2018 - 07:28 AM, said:

View PostTigerMom, on 05 November 2018 - 01:01 AM, said:

View PostleftyDH04, on 03 November 2018 - 09:07 PM, said:

No real effect on academics?

That's the line I'd question.

There is one kid who took a year off before high school and trained in famous tennis academy

Did some distance learning courses and SAT prep during that year

Went back home the next year and resumed in the grade below his normal classmates

He ended up at school of his choice playing tennis and parents said he was better prepared academically and stronger player


But what's the percentage of this being affective. There is always that guy who wins the lottery. And millions who don't.
Making it as a professional athlete is a long shot. Why would you gamble there education on that.

not trying to go pro

getting into better academic school actually via tennis

also it helps if attending private school since they are much more accommodating in doing this

28

#59 agatha

agatha

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,033 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 308263
  • Joined: 04/13/2014
GolfWRX Likes : 1408

Posted 06 November 2018 - 11:51 PM

I am of the opinion that being older is advantageous for athletics as a whole if that is important to a kid.  And I can guarantee you that college coaches for golf  REALLY LIKE multisport athletes.  My son was a sept b-day, we decided to wait and it made a tremendous difference, not only academically but very much so in athletics.  

He played all sports growing up and excelled at them, I have to think much of it had to do with age and the confidence of doing well in both school and sports brought.  Success breeds success.  My son found golf at 7, he was very serious at 10 and made it his goal to play in college and then be a pro.  He played D1 on an 80% first year and full ride for his final 3 (yes that is VERY uncommon in mens golf) but the coach wanted him and he saw something in him so he made a generous offer.   Anyway back to the being older thing,  Most all coaches that were recruiting my son loved that he played multiple sports, (he did so thru junior year of high school) and they loved his size 6'2" 180..   I believe in my heart that if I had put him in a year sooner, he may have still had success, but not to the same level, the kids in his grade that were almost a full year younger just didn't have the same level of strength coordination and quite frankly maturity to really strive to be successful.  

In Malcom Gladwells book Outliers, he even discusses that when you are born and what age you are in athletics can be a huge impact.  For club soccer the birthday cutoff was right around my sons b-day and he benefitted there as well, being oldest in an age group.  

All I am suggesting is if you want to give your kids an athletic advantage which can carry over into other parts of their lives it seems to me that age does make a difference

by the way, he is now a pro, has not made it to the top tour yet but he is still working hard and determined.

29

#60 Palmetto Golfer

Palmetto Golfer

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 147 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 179906
  • Joined: 05/09/2012
GolfWRX Likes : 147

Posted 07 November 2018 - 05:18 PM

I agree with Agatha

I have two boys....oldest is an August birthday and the younger is an October birthday.  The cutoff for sports around here is Sept. 1st.  The two of them are very different so I get to see if from different perspectives.

Oldest son (12 y/o) - usually is the youngest and he is thin to begin with. In football and soccer, he was a middle of the pack kid.  he did ok but certainly didn't stand out.  We made the decision to have him repeat 4K. This had nothing to do with sports. He is a quiet kid and we thought it was best for his maturity.  Now he is in 6th grade. At his school, he plays basketball for 6th grade and starts. If we had not held him back, there is no way he could play meaningful minutes for the 7th grade team. He is not big/fast/strong enough to hang.  He would play some be definitely not start.

Younger son (10 y/o) - totally different. He is usually one of the older kids on the field. Most of the time, he is the best player. He is just bigger/faster/stronger than the other kids. He has a ton of confidence. He is always the quarterback/point guard/shortstop when he plays. He is athletically gifted but it certainly doesn't hurt to be one of the older kids.

Like I said, we didn't hold back our oldest for sport reasons.  He need it from a confidence/maturity stand point but it has helped him in sports.  I am in favor of it if you think your child needs it.  It certainly doesn't hurt.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


Wanna get rid of this ugly yellow box? And remove other annoying "stuff" in between posts? Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

30



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

GolfWRX Sponsors