Jump to content

Welcome. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with members, access to all forums and eligiblility to win free giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

Yearly Tmnt Schedule for 10 & younger.


41 replies to this topic

#31 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,701 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2308

Posted 11 October 2018 - 01:23 PM

View Postmrshinsa, on 11 October 2018 - 01:17 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 04 October 2018 - 08:26 AM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 03 October 2018 - 04:00 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 October 2018 - 03:16 PM, said:

That's right, SCPGA doesn't allow parents at the events at all, do they?  You guys in California are too serious about your golf.  Must've had too many parents brawling in the parking lot after tournaments.

It's about 70% of the courses that allow parents to spectate on the golf course.  Only talking with the child should be about whether or not they need food / drink or if they are hurt.  At the other 30% where they don't allow spectators, the CRAZY parents try watching from outside the fences while the normal parents enjoy a beer.  Pace of play is faster without parent caddies and amazingly, the kids actually talk about things that are important to them among themselves.

*Spectating means you stay 25 yards or more away at all times and on the cart path.  No walking with your child.

That is how it is here, but 50 yards away from the kids.  How some parents spectate bugs me.  You should always try to walk ahead of the group.

How to Properly Observe a Group (Where you should stand & walk)
  • Follow your players from a distance (at least 25 yards). Stay ahead of the group and in the rough or on the cart paths. Do not lag behind the participants as this often delays the group behind.
  • The FSGA encourages spectators to stay ahead of players to help spot golf balls.
  • You should NOT be in the fairway.
  • Stay to the side of the action and remain still and quiet while all players play.
  • Move forward to the putting green when all shots have been completed.
  • Putting Green - Spectators must never be on the putting surface and should observe the putting green from a reasonable distance that will not interfere with the players
  • Looking for Balls - Please help spot balls for all players. Spectators are encouraged to watch each player's shot closely and may assist searching for a lost ball during the five-minute search period.

Could be different in other organization, but spectators are not allowed to go ahead of the group per US Kids policy.  Otherwise I would have the whole family spread out 200 yards in the front to keep an eye out for my sons ball.  :search:

Spectator Policy: If spectator carts are permitted, the above Cart Policy must be followed. Cell phones, headphones, pagers, and the like may not be used during play. All walking spectators should stay on or near the cart path at all times. Spectators are not allowed on the greens or in the fairway. Please stay behind the group being followed and do not go ahead to spot shots in advance of play. First offense: warning, Second offense: removal from the golf course.

US Kids does some odd things and this is one of them.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


1

#32 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,701 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2308

Posted 11 October 2018 - 01:29 PM

View Postmrshinsa, on 11 October 2018 - 01:17 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 04 October 2018 - 08:26 AM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 03 October 2018 - 04:00 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 October 2018 - 03:16 PM, said:

That's right, SCPGA doesn't allow parents at the events at all, do they?  You guys in California are too serious about your golf.  Must've had too many parents brawling in the parking lot after tournaments.

It's about 70% of the courses that allow parents to spectate on the golf course.  Only talking with the child should be about whether or not they need food / drink or if they are hurt.  At the other 30% where they don't allow spectators, the CRAZY parents try watching from outside the fences while the normal parents enjoy a beer.  Pace of play is faster without parent caddies and amazingly, the kids actually talk about things that are important to them among themselves.

*Spectating means you stay 25 yards or more away at all times and on the cart path.  No walking with your child.

That is how it is here, but 50 yards away from the kids.  How some parents spectate bugs me.  You should always try to walk ahead of the group.

How to Properly Observe a Group (Where you should stand & walk)
  • Follow your players from a distance (at least 25 yards). Stay ahead of the group and in the rough or on the cart paths. Do not lag behind the participants as this often delays the group behind.
  • The FSGA encourages spectators to stay ahead of players to help spot golf balls.
  • You should NOT be in the fairway.
  • Stay to the side of the action and remain still and quiet while all players play.
  • Move forward to the putting green when all shots have been completed.
  • Putting Green - Spectators must never be on the putting surface and should observe the putting green from a reasonable distance that will not interfere with the players
  • Looking for Balls - Please help spot balls for all players. Spectators are encouraged to watch each player's shot closely and may assist searching for a lost ball during the five-minute search period.

Could be different in other organization, but spectators are not allowed to go ahead of the group per US Kids policy.  Otherwise I would have the whole family spread out 200 yards in the front to keep an eye out for my sons ball.  :search:

Spectator Policy: If spectator carts are permitted, the above Cart Policy must be followed. Cell phones, headphones, pagers, and the like may not be used during play. All walking spectators should stay on or near the cart path at all times. Spectators are not allowed on the greens or in the fairway. Please stay behind the group being followed and do not go ahead to spot shots in advance of play. First offense: warning, Second offense: removal from the golf course.

This is the AJGA rules.  Look at #8.  Close to what I posted previously.  

I think US Kids may do it because of the number of people that rent carts.  A lot of the cart renters are casual observers of golf and don't understand the etiquette to use with them.  I can see them riding up on groups ahead of them and not being considerate of their play.  As you move away from US Kids you will see less parents and observers renting carts.  

Parents Code of Conduct

"In golf, customs of etiquette and decorum are just as important as rules governing play." It is appropriate for parents and spectators to applaud successful strokes, but in order to secure the spirit of the game, we ask parents and spectators to please adhere to the following guidelines: (Please note that if any of the following guidelines are perceived as broken by an AJGA official, the player may be subject to penalty.)

1. Advice (Rule 8) is any counsel or suggestion which could influence a player in determining his play, the choice of a club or the method of making a stroke. In addition, any conversation between player/spectator may be construed as advice. This includes any conversation between player/spectator in their native language. In either instance, penalty for breach of this rule is two strokes. Players are responsible for the actions of their relatives and spectators in regards to this rule.

2. Keeping the above statement in mind, please keep your conversation with the player to words of encouragement as long as advice is not given.

3. Spectators attend AJGA events at their own risk.

4. Please turn off all cell phones at AJGA events.

5. The AJGA does not allow spectator carts except if the spectator has a permanent handicap placard. Handicap spectators must present their placard to the Tournament Director prior to getting a golf cart. Spectators will not receive a cart unless they have this official placard. Letters from doctors or visible injuries will not warrant a golf cart without a placard.

6. All players and spectators are not permitted to ride on the back of a golf cart at any time during AJGA competitions.

7. Spectators should stay on cart paths. In the absence of cart paths, we ask that spectators stay in the rough. Please stay off fairways, tees and greens.

8. Spectators should stay one shot ahead of the group they are following. This allows spectators to follow errant shots and help identify where the ball comes to rest. Spectators are allowed to aid in the search for lost golf balls.

9. Spectators should not give rulings. Please seek an AJGA rules official if the need arises.

10. Spectators are allowed to carry medicine, drinks, food, umbrellas, etc.

11. The AJGA staff may assess a penalty to the player based on the severity of the spectator violation. If a serious breach has occurred, the spectator may be asked to leave the facility or the spectator may not be permitted to attend another AJGA event.

12. For your personal safety, we ask you exercise caution at all times. When inclement weather moves into the area, the AJGA will suspend play by sounding airhorns. Accordingly, you should seek shelter immediately. The AJGA staff will evacuate players from the course first and then spectators.

The AJGA staff will further discuss the spectator guidelines at each tournament's parents meeting.


2

#33 AUSweeper

AUSweeper

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 28 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 492298
  • Joined: 01/30/2018
GolfWRX Likes : 25

Posted 11 October 2018 - 01:56 PM

View Posthangontight, on 11 October 2018 - 11:42 AM, said:

Holiday Classic (12/21/2018) or Copperhead Classic (1/19/2018)?

We did Holiday Classic last year.  Enjoyed it very much, but the travel just before Christmas was taxing.  Thinking about trying Copperhead classic this year instead, a few weeks later.  Anyone done both and can compare?

We havenít done the Holiday Classic, but did the Copperhead a couple of years ago.  They didnít have any social events the evening before the tourney like other regionals.  Which was ok for us.  My then 7yo thought it was cool to play where the PGA plays (7 yo age group doesnít play the same course, but he didnít know that).

3

#34 4rheel

4rheel

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,417 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 20950
  • Joined: 10/26/2006
  • Location:OC, California
GolfWRX Likes : 429

Posted 11 October 2018 - 01:57 PM

View Postleezer99, on 03 October 2018 - 04:00 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 October 2018 - 03:16 PM, said:

That's right, SCPGA doesn't allow parents at the events at all, do they?  You guys in California are too serious about your golf.  Must've had too many parents brawling in the parking lot after tournaments.

It's about 70% of the courses that allow parents to spectate on the golf course.  Only talking with the child should be about whether or not they need food / drink or if they are hurt.  At the other 30% where they don't allow spectators, the CRAZY parents try watching from outside the fences while the normal parents enjoy a beer.  Pace of play is faster without parent caddies and amazingly, the kids actually talk about things that are important to them among themselves.

*Spectating means you stay 25 yards or more away at all times and on the cart path.  No walking with your child.

My kid played this past Sunday at David L. Baker SCPGA Junior event.  As I left to run some errands, I saw some parents walking around the fence over by the street to spectate since parents weren't allowed to follow on the course.

Was at another one before that where I saw volunteers repeatedly remind parents they have to stay away from players and cannot coach their kid.

What's up with us Californians.  Lol

4

#35 leezer99

leezer99

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 94152
  • Joined: 09/10/2009
GolfWRX Likes : 1026

Posted 11 October 2018 - 02:24 PM

View Post4rheel, on 11 October 2018 - 01:57 PM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 03 October 2018 - 04:00 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 October 2018 - 03:16 PM, said:

That's right, SCPGA doesn't allow parents at the events at all, do they?  You guys in California are too serious about your golf.  Must've had too many parents brawling in the parking lot after tournaments.

It's about 70% of the courses that allow parents to spectate on the golf course.  Only talking with the child should be about whether or not they need food / drink or if they are hurt.  At the other 30% where they don't allow spectators, the CRAZY parents try watching from outside the fences while the normal parents enjoy a beer.  Pace of play is faster without parent caddies and amazingly, the kids actually talk about things that are important to them among themselves.

*Spectating means you stay 25 yards or more away at all times and on the cart path.  No walking with your child.

My kid played this past Sunday at David L. Baker SCPGA Junior event.  As I left to run some errands, I saw some parents walking around the fence over by the street to spectate since parents weren't allowed to follow on the course.

Was at another one before that where I saw volunteers repeatedly remind parents they have to stay away from players and cannot coach their kid.

What's up with us Californians.  Lol

Hope your boy had fun.  At least his pop wasn't one of the wacko's outside of the fence embarrassing the poor kids.


5

#36 4rheel

4rheel

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,417 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 20950
  • Joined: 10/26/2006
  • Location:OC, California
GolfWRX Likes : 429

Posted 11 October 2018 - 04:01 PM

View Postleezer99, on 11 October 2018 - 02:24 PM, said:

View Post4rheel, on 11 October 2018 - 01:57 PM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 03 October 2018 - 04:00 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 October 2018 - 03:16 PM, said:

That's right, SCPGA doesn't allow parents at the events at all, do they?  You guys in California are too serious about your golf.  Must've had too many parents brawling in the parking lot after tournaments.

It's about 70% of the courses that allow parents to spectate on the golf course.  Only talking with the child should be about whether or not they need food / drink or if they are hurt.  At the other 30% where they don't allow spectators, the CRAZY parents try watching from outside the fences while the normal parents enjoy a beer.  Pace of play is faster without parent caddies and amazingly, the kids actually talk about things that are important to them among themselves.

*Spectating means you stay 25 yards or more away at all times and on the cart path.  No walking with your child.

My kid played this past Sunday at David L. Baker SCPGA Junior event.  As I left to run some errands, I saw some parents walking around the fence over by the street to spectate since parents weren't allowed to follow on the course.

Was at another one before that where I saw volunteers repeatedly remind parents they have to stay away from players and cannot coach their kid.

What's up with us Californians.  Lol

Hope your boy had fun.  At least his pop wasn't one of the wacko's outside of the fence embarrassing the poor kids.

He had fun even though he didn't play well.  Isn't that what it's all about?

6

#37 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 782 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 371

Posted 12 October 2018 - 02:32 PM

View Postmrshinsa, on 11 October 2018 - 01:17 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 04 October 2018 - 08:26 AM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 03 October 2018 - 04:00 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 October 2018 - 03:16 PM, said:

That's right, SCPGA doesn't allow parents at the events at all, do they?  You guys in California are too serious about your golf.  Must've had too many parents brawling in the parking lot after tournaments.

It's about 70% of the courses that allow parents to spectate on the golf course.  Only talking with the child should be about whether or not they need food / drink or if they are hurt.  At the other 30% where they don't allow spectators, the CRAZY parents try watching from outside the fences while the normal parents enjoy a beer.  Pace of play is faster without parent caddies and amazingly, the kids actually talk about things that are important to them among themselves.

*Spectating means you stay 25 yards or more away at all times and on the cart path.  No walking with your child.

That is how it is here, but 50 yards away from the kids.  How some parents spectate bugs me.  You should always try to walk ahead of the group.

    How to Properly Observe a Group (Where you should stand & walk)
  • Follow your players from a distance (at least 25 yards). Stay ahead of the group and in the rough or on the cart paths. Do not lag behind the participants as this often delays the group behind.
  • The FSGA encourages spectators to stay ahead of players to help spot golf balls.
  • You should NOT be in the fairway.
  • Stay to the side of the action and remain still and quiet while all players play.
  • Move forward to the putting green when all shots have been completed.
  • Putting Green - Spectators must never be on the putting surface and should observe the putting green from a reasonable distance that will not interfere with the players
  • Looking for Balls - Please help spot balls for all players. Spectators are encouraged to watch each player's shot closely and may assist searching for a lost ball during the five-minute search period.

Could be different in other organization, but spectators are not allowed to go ahead of the group per US Kids policy.  Otherwise I would have the whole family spread out 200 yards in the front to keep an eye out for my sons ball.  :search:

Spectator Policy: If spectator carts are permitted, the above Cart Policy must be followed. Cell phones, headphones, pagers, and the like may not be used during play. All walking spectators should stay on or near the cart path at all times. Spectators are not allowed on the greens or in the fairway. Please stay behind the group being followed and do not go ahead to spot shots in advance of play. First offense: warning, Second offense: removal from the golf course.

I havenít seen that policy anywhere of course or at least enforced if it is in place. I will admit I am as guilty as anyone or reading the official policy of every tour we play. Generally speaking though if you just stay away from the kids and watch and there isnít any problems.

The only reason I can see not allowing ahead of the kids is if there was a problem of dropping extra balls on the course. Could not imagine too many people get away with that sort of thing.


7

#38 leezer99

leezer99

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,030 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 94152
  • Joined: 09/10/2009
GolfWRX Likes : 1026

Posted 12 October 2018 - 03:09 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 12 October 2018 - 02:32 PM, said:

View Postmrshinsa, on 11 October 2018 - 01:17 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 04 October 2018 - 08:26 AM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 03 October 2018 - 04:00 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 October 2018 - 03:16 PM, said:

That's right, SCPGA doesn't allow parents at the events at all, do they?  You guys in California are too serious about your golf.  Must've had too many parents brawling in the parking lot after tournaments.

It's about 70% of the courses that allow parents to spectate on the golf course.  Only talking with the child should be about whether or not they need food / drink or if they are hurt.  At the other 30% where they don't allow spectators, the CRAZY parents try watching from outside the fences while the normal parents enjoy a beer.  Pace of play is faster without parent caddies and amazingly, the kids actually talk about things that are important to them among themselves.

*Spectating means you stay 25 yards or more away at all times and on the cart path.  No walking with your child.

That is how it is here, but 50 yards away from the kids.  How some parents spectate bugs me.  You should always try to walk ahead of the group.

How to Properly Observe a Group (Where you should stand & walk)
  • Follow your players from a distance (at least 25 yards). Stay ahead of the group and in the rough or on the cart paths. Do not lag behind the participants as this often delays the group behind.
  • The FSGA encourages spectators to stay ahead of players to help spot golf balls.
  • You should NOT be in the fairway.
  • Stay to the side of the action and remain still and quiet while all players play.
  • Move forward to the putting green when all shots have been completed.
  • Putting Green - Spectators must never be on the putting surface and should observe the putting green from a reasonable distance that will not interfere with the players
  • Looking for Balls - Please help spot balls for all players. Spectators are encouraged to watch each player's shot closely and may assist searching for a lost ball during the five-minute search period.

Could be different in other organization, but spectators are not allowed to go ahead of the group per US Kids policy.  Otherwise I would have the whole family spread out 200 yards in the front to keep an eye out for my sons ball.  :search:

Spectator Policy: If spectator carts are permitted, the above Cart Policy must be followed. Cell phones, headphones, pagers, and the like may not be used during play. All walking spectators should stay on or near the cart path at all times. Spectators are not allowed on the greens or in the fairway. Please stay behind the group being followed and do not go ahead to spot shots in advance of play. First offense: warning, Second offense: removal from the golf course.

I haven't seen that policy anywhere of course or at least enforced if it is in place. I will admit I am as guilty as anyone or reading the official policy of every tour we play. Generally speaking though if you just stay away from the kids and watch and there isn't any problems.

The only reason I can see not allowing ahead of the kids is if there was a problem of dropping extra balls on the course. Could not imagine too many people get away with that sort of thing.

Scenarios where parents walking ahead are a problem (real life examples from 9=11 year old groups)

1. Child hits ball into a hazard up ahead where their parent is.  Once you all get to the ball it is no longer in the hazard and sitting nicely in some grass.
2. Child hits ball into a hazard again up ahead where parent is.  Miraculously the ball is in a playable position with a straight shot to the green.
3. Your child hits their ball down the middle up ahead where the other kids parent is.  Somehow your ball is never found.

8

#39 kekoa

kekoa

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,940 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 66944
  • Joined: 10/02/2008
  • Location:in the hole
  • Handicap:4-20
GolfWRX Likes : 1919

Posted 12 October 2018 - 04:21 PM

/\/\ That is pretty incredible.  I need to remind my wife that she isn't doing her job as a spectator!!  lmao

Edited by kekoa, 12 October 2018 - 04:22 PM.


9

#40 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,701 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2308

Posted 12 October 2018 - 04:22 PM

View Postleezer99, on 12 October 2018 - 03:09 PM, said:


Scenarios where parents walking ahead are a problem (real life examples from 9=11 year old groups)

1. Child hits ball into a hazard up ahead where their parent is.  Once you all get to the ball it is no longer in the hazard and sitting nicely in some grass.
2. Child hits ball into a hazard again up ahead where parent is.  Miraculously the ball is in a playable position with a straight shot to the green.
3. Your child hits their ball down the middle up ahead where the other kids parent is.  Somehow your ball is never found.


That is crazy.  

I did see a high school coach once drop a ball out of his pocket for a girl at the state high school championship.

I really can't imagine anyone doing that.  Loss of reputation, DQ from event and probably the tour.  I have seen some crazy stuff, but stuff like this makes me shake my head.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


10

#41 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 782 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 371

Posted 12 October 2018 - 04:33 PM

I am well aware of these scenarios leezer is talking about and they have happens to us in tournaments but that was years ago before I knew what to look for. The good thing is  there also the easiest to catch.

You know you have a problem if someone is always getting a perfect lie and everyone elseís is going into the water.  People who cheat have balls that donít obey physics. You know someone Is honest if they will stand back 10-15 yards before walking up to the ball. It always a good policy to have two people see the ball if there is a chance it was in water or out of bounds.

Edited by tiger1873, 12 October 2018 - 04:33 PM.


11

#42 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 782 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 371

Posted 12 October 2018 - 05:09 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 12 October 2018 - 04:22 PM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 12 October 2018 - 03:09 PM, said:


Scenarios where parents walking ahead are a problem (real life examples from 9=11 year old groups)

1. Child hits ball into a hazard up ahead where their parent is.  Once you all get to the ball it is no longer in the hazard and sitting nicely in some grass.
2. Child hits ball into a hazard again up ahead where parent is.  Miraculously the ball is in a playable position with a straight shot to the green.
3. Your child hits their ball down the middle up ahead where the other kids parent is.  Somehow your ball is never found.


That is crazy.  

I did see a high school coach once drop a ball out of his pocket for a girl at the state high school championship.

I really can't imagine anyone doing that.  Loss of reputation, DQ from event and probably the tour.  I have seen some crazy stuff, but stuff like this makes me shake my head.

It happens more in places with wooded courses and rivers. A lot course in Texas have wooded areas and creeks around the holes. So sometimes you canít really tell where a ball ends up.  In places like Florida you generally can see the complete hole and it would be very obvious.  Used to laugh at all the balls left on the course when your the last few groups going though. Most of this stuff though happens in 1 day tournaments. Could not think of a junior who actually is ranked doing it as it would be really bad for them.

12



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

GolfWRX Sponsors