Jump to content

Welcome. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with members, access to all forums and eligiblility to win free giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

Scholarships not as easy for girls as most people think


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 697 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 330

Posted 13 September 2018 - 09:09 AM

I thought this was an interesting article on College golf for girls and hard it is to actually get a scholarship.  I would imagine for boys it is even worse.


https://golfweek.com...l-as-you-think/


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


1

#2 dpb5031

dpb5031

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,644 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67947
  • Joined: 10/21/2008
  • Location:Central NJ
GolfWRX Likes : 2900

Posted 13 September 2018 - 09:23 AM

Yes, it's a pretty big myth that golf scholarships for girls are easy to get. You need to be a damned good player to get any level of D1 scholarship money, full-rides being even tougher. When you consider the highly regarded and most desirable colleges and universities, whether youre looking at athletic reputation or academic reputation, it gets even harder and is extremely competitive.

Still, boy's scholarships are at an entirely different level of competitiveness. It's a numbers game.  There are way more junior male golfers than female, and they're competing for less available scholarships due to Title ix.  Only the best of the best get full rides.
USGA Index: ~2

WITB:
2018 Taylormade M3 8.5 Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 6x
Taylormade M2 Tour 15 Fujikura Pro TourSpec 73 S
Kasco K2K 33 - UST Axivcore 65 Tour Green S
Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
Taylormade TP5X Ball

2

#3 dpb5031

dpb5031

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,644 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67947
  • Joined: 10/21/2008
  • Location:Central NJ
GolfWRX Likes : 2900

Posted 13 September 2018 - 09:52 AM

I'll add some color from personal experience.  My daughter is a sophomore in college, playing golf on a full-ride at a mid-tier (athletics) D1 university with an excellent academic and student life reputation.  We feel extremely fortunate.

My daughter was a good junior player, but not consistently great.  She was ranked around 140 for her graduating class her senior year, but on occassion dipped into the top 100 briefly during the recruiting phase prior to that.

I believe 3 main things contributed to her getting a 100% scholarship even with relatively mediocre JGS rankings.

1.  She was a multi-sport athlete and not a "golf only" kid, and she's a long hitter with good solid swing mechanics. Many coaches (but not all) like to recruit "athletes."

2.  She made it through sectional qualifying to 2 USGA National championships, the US Girl's Junior, and the US Women's Am. These are high profile and attract coach's attention as USGA set-ups are notoriously difficult. Many highly ranked players dont make it to these events, so they carry weight.

3.  We got lucky! I say that because she played in a fairly high profile junior event with a large field and won the tournament in a playoff after shooting under par in the final round.  We were lucky in that there were a bunch of coaches watching that day, including her current college coach.  He made her the offer right after that event.

It also did not hurt that her grades were good and she did some impressive things in community service that ultimately led to her winning the AJGA-USGA Presidents Leadership Award.

BTW, scholarships are not guaranteed for all 4 years, and players re-sign annually.  Many coaches will give you a verbal promise (not binding) for all 4, but many will not.

We feel very fortunate.  Shes had only moderate success with her golf so far in college, but the overall experience has been great and shes getting a top notch education.
USGA Index: ~2

WITB:
2018 Taylormade M3 8.5 Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 6x
Taylormade M2 Tour 15 Fujikura Pro TourSpec 73 S
Kasco K2K 33 - UST Axivcore 65 Tour Green S
Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
Taylormade TP5X Ball

3

#4 BertGA

BertGA

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 500442
  • Joined: 04/29/2018
  • Location:Georgia
GolfWRX Likes : 204

Posted 13 September 2018 - 11:20 AM

Sounds like a great kid...is that her in your profile pic?

4

#5 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,643 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2208

Posted 13 September 2018 - 11:44 AM

View Postdpb5031, on 13 September 2018 - 09:23 AM, said:

Yes, it's a pretty big myth that golf scholarships for girls are easy to get. You need to be a damned good player to get any level of D1 scholarship money, full-rides being even tougher. When you consider the highly regarded and most desirable colleges and universities, whether youre looking at athletic reputation or academic reputation, it gets even harder and is extremely competitive.

Still, boy's scholarships are at an entirely different level of competitiveness. It's a numbers game.  There are way more junior male golfers than female, and they're competing for less available scholarships due to Title ix.  Only the best of the best get full rides.

I semi-got into an argument with a lady at an event the other day about scholarships.

Me:  How you doing?  Where is your daughter going to school?
Her:  She is going to ______ which is a DIII school.
Me:  That is great.  How much academic money did she get?
Her:  She got a full athletic ride.
Me:  Wow.  That is amazing considering DIII schools don't give athletic scholarships.  DIII football players don't even get athletic money.  The only money they can give is for academics.
Her:  There are ways around that.  She got a grant.
Me:  Really?  A grant isn't a scholarship.  You have to pay grant money back.
Her:  Blank stare.


5

#6 dpb5031

dpb5031

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,644 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67947
  • Joined: 10/21/2008
  • Location:Central NJ
GolfWRX Likes : 2900

Posted 13 September 2018 - 12:34 PM

View PostBertGA, on 13 September 2018 - 11:20 AM, said:

Sounds like a great kid...is that her in your profile pic?

Yes sir.  She got to play a round of golf with Rickie Fowler at The Bear's Club for winning the AJGA-USGA Presidents Leadership Award.  Quite a nice experience!
USGA Index: ~2

WITB:
2018 Taylormade M3 8.5 Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 6x
Taylormade M2 Tour 15 Fujikura Pro TourSpec 73 S
Kasco K2K 33 - UST Axivcore 65 Tour Green S
Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
Taylormade TP5X Ball

6

#7 me05501

me05501

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 406 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 499624
  • Joined: 04/19/2018
  • Location:Chattanooga, TN
  • Ebay ID:mike_in_chattanooga
GolfWRX Likes : 328

Posted 13 September 2018 - 12:44 PM

I think the conventional wisdom about ladies' golf scholarships is less true now than back when people started saying it (and it's debatable whether it was all that true back then).

I think the general post-Title IX thinking was that women should find a tertiary sport in which to excel, since coaches would supposedly have all these scholarships and nowhere to use them. That gap closed pretty quickly. Now there are year-round competitive travel teams for all the women's scholarship sports.

7

#8 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 697 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 330

Posted 13 September 2018 - 06:10 PM

Not to sure how many have done college camps but we done a bunch of them and you can almost always count on at least one or two girls who are trying to get on a scholarship but can't break 80 consistently. They have broken 80 once in tournament but you really need a better record then that.

From what I seen and been told is if you getting in the low 70s on college length courses there is a pretty good chance of multiple colleges interested. That really means they are pretty much scratch from around 6000 yards.  

I have also been told if you have good academic studies that helps with girls who may be a project since they can have more projects on the team.  So a good reason to make sure you kids also take advanced classes as well in school.

Edited by tiger1873, 14 September 2018 - 07:21 AM.


8

#9 dicko999

dicko999

    I call it "Celebration"

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 463 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 95237
  • Joined: 09/26/2009
  • Location:Oceanside, CA
  • Handicap:Beer
GolfWRX Likes : 359

Posted 13 September 2018 - 08:22 PM

Still trying to get my daughter into rowing.  Scholarship heaven!
TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 10.5*
TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 17*
Ping G20 20*, 23* Hybrids
Ping G400 5-PW
Titleist Vokey SM7 50*F, 56*M, 62*M
Titleist Scotty Cameron California Del Mar

9

#10 JBirdUt

JBirdUt

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 353 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 180076
  • Joined: 05/09/2012
  • Ebay ID:J.r.1968
GolfWRX Likes : 148

Posted 13 September 2018 - 08:35 PM

Grade point average is a critical part of the recruiting process. My daughter is a strong player, 76 from 6000+ yards. She is improving from a year depression, in which her GPA suffered.  She has reached out to D1 schools, some who have looked at her and some who haven't.  She's been told she has the ability but her academics are a turn off.  She has been offered a few D2 and NAIA scholarships and I feel this would be the best way for her to go, if she desires.



Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


10

#11 dhartmann34

dhartmann34

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 489 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 51852
  • Joined: 03/20/2008
  • Location:Chicago, IL
  • Handicap:3
GolfWRX Likes : 232

Posted 13 September 2018 - 09:40 PM

You're correct, they don't give athletic scholarships at D3 schools...in name. But in reality they do. Just a disguise. If they want you, they'll make it happen.

I received "academic" scholarships and grants to a D3 school...where I played golf. Scholarships are given for essentially any reason the school decides. Oh you're good at football, here's 15k in 'academic' scholarships..even though you're a C student.  Essentially my scholarships covered most of what my "need based" grants did not.

Grants are a bit different but also do NOT need to be paid back. They're usually based on income levels for the parents and student...which determines the need...which is what they are granted based on.

View Postheavy_hitter, on 13 September 2018 - 11:44 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 13 September 2018 - 09:23 AM, said:

Yes, it's a pretty big myth that golf scholarships for girls are easy to get. You need to be a damned good player to get any level of D1 scholarship money, full-rides being even tougher. When you consider the highly regarded and most desirable colleges and universities, whether youre looking at athletic reputation or academic reputation, it gets even harder and is extremely competitive.

Still, boy's scholarships are at an entirely different level of competitiveness. It's a numbers game.  There are way more junior male golfers than female, and they're competing for less available scholarships due to Title ix.  Only the best of the best get full rides.

I semi-got into an argument with a lady at an event the other day about scholarships.

Me:  How you doing?  Where is your daughter going to school?
Her:  She is going to ______ which is a DIII school.
Me:  That is great.  How much academic money did she get?
Her:  She got a full athletic ride.
Me:  Wow.  That is amazing considering DIII schools don't give athletic scholarships.  DIII football players don't even get athletic money.  The only money they can give is for academics.
Her:  There are ways around that.  She got a grant.
Me:  Really?  A grant isn't a scholarship.  You have to pay grant money back.
Her:  Blank stare.


11

#12 dhartmann34

dhartmann34

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 489 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 51852
  • Joined: 03/20/2008
  • Location:Chicago, IL
  • Handicap:3
GolfWRX Likes : 232

Posted 13 September 2018 - 09:47 PM

GPA is certainly a factor when they are evaluating athletes, but it obviously depends on who they are competing against. They'll take a girl with a C average in the classroom and a 74 average on the course over a girl with an A average and a 79. It's a balancing act.

A friend of mine who is an assistant coach at a  smaller D1 school out west says they have some money for scholarships, but they need to see positive results so that the departments continue to send it their way... especially since it's a non revenue generating sport.

I hope your daughter finds a place she enjoys and plays well! Best wishes!

View PostJBirdUt, on 13 September 2018 - 08:35 PM, said:

Grade point average is a critical part of the recruiting process. My daughter is a strong player, 76 from 6000+ yards. She is improving from a year depression, in which her GPA suffered.  She has reached out to D1 schools, some who have looked at her and some who haven't.  She's been told she has the ability but her academics are a turn off.  She has been offered a few D2 and NAIA scholarships and I feel this would be the best way for her to go, if she desires.


12

#13 md1m

md1m

    Tour Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 730 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 313547
  • Joined: 05/07/2014
  • Location:Central Texas
GolfWRX Likes : 460

Posted 13 September 2018 - 10:20 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 13 September 2018 - 11:44 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 13 September 2018 - 09:23 AM, said:

Yes, it's a pretty big myth that golf scholarships for girls are easy to get. You need to be a damned good player to get any level of D1 scholarship money, full-rides being even tougher. When you consider the highly regarded and most desirable colleges and universities, whether youre looking at athletic reputation or academic reputation, it gets even harder and is extremely competitive.

Still, boy's scholarships are at an entirely different level of competitiveness. It's a numbers game.  There are way more junior male golfers than female, and they're competing for less available scholarships due to Title ix.  Only the best of the best get full rides.

I semi-got into an argument with a lady at an event the other day about scholarships.

Me:  How you doing?  Where is your daughter going to school?
Her:  She is going to ______ which is a DIII school.
Me:  That is great.  How much academic money did she get?
Her:  She got a full athletic ride.
Me:  Wow.  That is amazing considering DIII schools don't give athletic scholarships.  DIII football players don't even get athletic money.  The only money they can give is for academics.
Her:  There are ways around that.  She got a grant.
Me:  Really?  A grant isn't a scholarship.  You have to pay grant money back.
Her:  Blank stare.

Actually, you don't have to pay back a grant. Maybe that's why she gave you a blank stare. I played D3 and got grants that covered almost everything, but probably had more to do with my academics and test scores than my marginal golf skills (I was #3 guy on the team).
Clubs are fluid

13

#14 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,643 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2208

Posted 14 September 2018 - 05:01 AM

View Postmd1m, on 13 September 2018 - 10:20 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 13 September 2018 - 11:44 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 13 September 2018 - 09:23 AM, said:

Yes, it's a pretty big myth that golf scholarships for girls are easy to get. You need to be a damned good player to get any level of D1 scholarship money, full-rides being even tougher. When you consider the highly regarded and most desirable colleges and universities, whether youre looking at athletic reputation or academic reputation, it gets even harder and is extremely competitive.

Still, boy's scholarships are at an entirely different level of competitiveness. It's a numbers game.  There are way more junior male golfers than female, and they're competing for less available scholarships due to Title ix.  Only the best of the best get full rides.

I semi-got into an argument with a lady at an event the other day about scholarships.

Me:  How you doing?  Where is your daughter going to school?
Her:  She is going to ______ which is a DIII school.
Me:  That is great.  How much academic money did she get?
Her:  She got a full athletic ride.
Me:  Wow.  That is amazing considering DIII schools don't give athletic scholarships.  DIII football players don't even get athletic money.  The only money they can give is for academics.
Her:  There are ways around that.  She got a grant.
Me:  Really?  A grant isn't a scholarship.  You have to pay grant money back.
Her:  Blank stare.

Actually, you don't have to pay back a grant. Maybe that's why she gave you a blank stare. I played D3 and got grants that covered almost everything, but probably had more to do with my academics and test scores than my marginal golf skills (I was #3 guy on the team).

I appreciate the clarification.

14

#15 dpb5031

dpb5031

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,644 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67947
  • Joined: 10/21/2008
  • Location:Central NJ
GolfWRX Likes : 2900

Posted 14 September 2018 - 07:18 AM

View Postdicko999, on 13 September 2018 - 08:22 PM, said:

Still trying to get my daughter into rowing.  Scholarship heaven!

Not really true.  Funny enough, I have two daughters. My older one rowed all through HS. She's fairly tall at 5'9" which is considered an advantage in rowing and had decent erg times in the mid 7s.

A fully funded D1 rowing program will have 20 scholarships to spread around. The problem is that they often carry over 50 rowers on the team.  Many teams are not fully funded and may only have 15 scholarships to spread around for 55 girls.  Also consider that most schools dont even have a rowing program.

In the end, only the real "beasts" will get a full ride.  I'm talking girls who can really pull incredible numbers on the erg and are typically 6' or taller and >180lbs. Any remaining money gets divvied up amongst the rest.

When my daughter was recruited the best she was offered was $6500 against a $55k annual tuition. Consider the massive time commitment and the intensity of the training and we decided it was not worth it...

Edit to add:  Compare what I've described above to a fully funded women's golf team with 6 full scholarships and often only 8 players on the team plus maybe a walk-on or two...

Edited by dpb5031, 14 September 2018 - 07:21 AM.

USGA Index: ~2

WITB:
2018 Taylormade M3 8.5 Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 6x
Taylormade M2 Tour 15 Fujikura Pro TourSpec 73 S
Kasco K2K 33 - UST Axivcore 65 Tour Green S
Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
Taylormade TP5X Ball

15

#16 me05501

me05501

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 406 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 499624
  • Joined: 04/19/2018
  • Location:Chattanooga, TN
  • Ebay ID:mike_in_chattanooga
GolfWRX Likes : 328

Posted 14 September 2018 - 07:26 AM

Golf and tennis do have the advantage of long-running and well-known tournaments where individuals have an opportunity to stand out and get noticed. If you play volleyball, you either need to be the student that a coach is coming to see, or be on that person's team, or be playing against that person when a coach happens to visit. You have to rely more on luck and genetics.

A tennis player probably needs the genetic advantage too. But a young golfer can be made from almost anyone who has the desire.

Maybe that's where the conventional wisdom about girls' golf scholarships is rooted. Not every girl can be a scholarship basketball player, but they still have a shot on the links.

16

#17 BertGA

BertGA

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 162 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 500442
  • Joined: 04/29/2018
  • Location:Georgia
GolfWRX Likes : 204

Posted 14 September 2018 - 07:42 AM

View Postdpb5031, on 14 September 2018 - 07:18 AM, said:

View Postdicko999, on 13 September 2018 - 08:22 PM, said:

Still trying to get my daughter into rowing.  Scholarship heaven!

Not really true.  Funny enough, I have two daughters. My older one rowed all through HS. She's fairly tall at 5'9" which is considered an advantage in rowing and had decent erg times in the mid 7s.

A fully funded D1 rowing program will have 20 scholarships to spread around. The problem is that they often carry over 50 rowers on the team.  Many teams are not fully funded and may only have 15 scholarships to spread around for 55 girls.  Also consider that most schools dont even have a rowing program.

In the end, only the real "beasts" will get a full ride.  I'm talking girls who can really pull incredible numbers on the erg and are typically 6' or taller and >180lbs. Any remaining money gets divvied up amongst the rest.

When my daughter was recruited the best she was offered was $6500 against a $55k annual tuition. Consider the massive time commitment and the intensity of the training and we decided it was not worth it...

Edit to add:  Compare what I've described above to a fully funded women's golf team with 6 full scholarships and often only 8 players on the team plus maybe a walk-on or two...

I would have to think that any scholarship money received to a rowing program needs to be reconciled with the fact that most rowing programs are concentrated in the East Coast, in higher-tuition universities. It’s great to say you have a scholarship, but when the tuition still ends up being greater than a good state school, does it really matter?

17

#18 dpb5031

dpb5031

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,644 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67947
  • Joined: 10/21/2008
  • Location:Central NJ
GolfWRX Likes : 2900

Posted 14 September 2018 - 08:05 AM

View PostBertGA, on 14 September 2018 - 07:42 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 14 September 2018 - 07:18 AM, said:

View Postdicko999, on 13 September 2018 - 08:22 PM, said:

Still trying to get my daughter into rowing.  Scholarship heaven!

Not really true.  Funny enough, I have two daughters. My older one rowed all through HS. She's fairly tall at 5'9" which is considered an advantage in rowing and had decent erg times in the mid 7s.

A fully funded D1 rowing program will have 20 scholarships to spread around. The problem is that they often carry over 50 rowers on the team.  Many teams are not fully funded and may only have 15 scholarships to spread around for 55 girls.  Also consider that most schools dont even have a rowing program.

In the end, only the real "beasts" will get a full ride.  I'm talking girls who can really pull incredible numbers on the erg and are typically 6' or taller and >180lbs. Any remaining money gets divvied up amongst the rest.

When my daughter was recruited the best she was offered was $6500 against a $55k annual tuition. Consider the massive time commitment and the intensity of the training and we decided it was not worth it...

Edit to add:  Compare what I've described above to a fully funded women's golf team with 6 full scholarships and often only 8 players on the team plus maybe a walk-on or two...

I would have to think that any scholarship money received to a rowing program needs to be reconciled with the fact that most rowing programs are concentrated in the East Coast, in higher-tuition universities. Itís great to say you have a scholarship, but when the tuition still ends up being greater than a good state school, does it really matter?

Exactly! Plus, when you consider the massive time commitment over the course of an entire year many would come out ahead working part-time at the campus Starbucks...lol!
USGA Index: ~2

WITB:
2018 Taylormade M3 8.5 Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 6x
Taylormade M2 Tour 15 Fujikura Pro TourSpec 73 S
Kasco K2K 33 - UST Axivcore 65 Tour Green S
Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
Taylormade TP5X Ball

18

#19 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,643 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2208

Posted 14 September 2018 - 09:39 AM

View PostBertGA, on 14 September 2018 - 07:42 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 14 September 2018 - 07:18 AM, said:

View Postdicko999, on 13 September 2018 - 08:22 PM, said:

Still trying to get my daughter into rowing.  Scholarship heaven!

Not really true.  Funny enough, I have two daughters. My older one rowed all through HS. She's fairly tall at 5'9" which is considered an advantage in rowing and had decent erg times in the mid 7s.

A fully funded D1 rowing program will have 20 scholarships to spread around. The problem is that they often carry over 50 rowers on the team.  Many teams are not fully funded and may only have 15 scholarships to spread around for 55 girls.  Also consider that most schools dont even have a rowing program.

In the end, only the real "beasts" will get a full ride.  I'm talking girls who can really pull incredible numbers on the erg and are typically 6' or taller and >180lbs. Any remaining money gets divvied up amongst the rest.

When my daughter was recruited the best she was offered was $6500 against a $55k annual tuition. Consider the massive time commitment and the intensity of the training and we decided it was not worth it...

Edit to add:  Compare what I've described above to a fully funded women's golf team with 6 full scholarships and often only 8 players on the team plus maybe a walk-on or two...

I would have to think that any scholarship money received to a rowing program needs to be reconciled with the fact that most rowing programs are concentrated in the East Coast, in higher-tuition universities. It’s great to say you have a scholarship, but when the tuition still ends up being greater than a good state school, does it really matter?

Actually, for D1 or DII rowers there are 20 scholarships available for women.  None for men.

19

#20 dpb5031

dpb5031

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,644 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 67947
  • Joined: 10/21/2008
  • Location:Central NJ
GolfWRX Likes : 2900

Posted 14 September 2018 - 10:39 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 14 September 2018 - 09:39 AM, said:

View PostBertGA, on 14 September 2018 - 07:42 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 14 September 2018 - 07:18 AM, said:

View Postdicko999, on 13 September 2018 - 08:22 PM, said:

Still trying to get my daughter into rowing.  Scholarship heaven!

Not really true.  Funny enough, I have two daughters. My older one rowed all through HS. She's fairly tall at 5'9" which is considered an advantage in rowing and had decent erg times in the mid 7s.

A fully funded D1 rowing program will have 20 scholarships to spread around. The problem is that they often carry over 50 rowers on the team.  Many teams are not fully funded and may only have 15 scholarships to spread around for 55 girls.  Also consider that most schools dont even have a rowing program.

In the end, only the real "beasts" will get a full ride.  I'm talking girls who can really pull incredible numbers on the erg and are typically 6' or taller and >180lbs. Any remaining money gets divvied up amongst the rest.

When my daughter was recruited the best she was offered was $6500 against a $55k annual tuition. Consider the massive time commitment and the intensity of the training and we decided it was not worth it...

Edit to add:  Compare what I've described above to a fully funded women's golf team with 6 full scholarships and often only 8 players on the team plus maybe a walk-on or two...

I would have to think that any scholarship money received to a rowing program needs to be reconciled with the fact that most rowing programs are concentrated in the East Coast, in higher-tuition universities. Itís great to say you have a scholarship, but when the tuition still ends up being greater than a good state school, does it really matter?

Actually, for D1 or DII rowers there are 20 scholarships available for women.  None for men.

20 if they're fully funded, less if not.  See my post above...often over 50 girls on a team. Give 4 or 5 fulls to the real stand-outs and there's not a lot left to spread around.

USGA Index: ~2

WITB:
2018 Taylormade M3 8.5 Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 6x
Taylormade M2 Tour 15 Fujikura Pro TourSpec 73 S
Kasco K2K 33 - UST Axivcore 65 Tour Green S
Ping G 22 Hybrid (2 flat) - Ping Tour 80 S
Ping i200 5-UW (2 flat) - Nippon Modus 105X
Ping Glide 2.0 - SS 54 (bent to 55 & 2 flat)
Taylormade Ho Toe 64 (Bent to 62 & 2 flat)
Palmer AP30R putter (circa 1960s)
Taylormade TP5X Ball

Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


Wanna get rid of this ugly yellow box? And remove other annoying "stuff" in between posts? Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

20

#21 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,643 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2208

Posted 14 September 2018 - 10:42 AM

View Postdpb5031, on 14 September 2018 - 10:39 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 14 September 2018 - 09:39 AM, said:

View PostBertGA, on 14 September 2018 - 07:42 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 14 September 2018 - 07:18 AM, said:

View Postdicko999, on 13 September 2018 - 08:22 PM, said:

Still trying to get my daughter into rowing.  Scholarship heaven!

Not really true.  Funny enough, I have two daughters. My older one rowed all through HS. She's fairly tall at 5'9" which is considered an advantage in rowing and had decent erg times in the mid 7s.

A fully funded D1 rowing program will have 20 scholarships to spread around. The problem is that they often carry over 50 rowers on the team.  Many teams are not fully funded and may only have 15 scholarships to spread around for 55 girls.  Also consider that most schools dont even have a rowing program.

In the end, only the real "beasts" will get a full ride.  I'm talking girls who can really pull incredible numbers on the erg and are typically 6' or taller and >180lbs. Any remaining money gets divvied up amongst the rest.

When my daughter was recruited the best she was offered was $6500 against a $55k annual tuition. Consider the massive time commitment and the intensity of the training and we decided it was not worth it...

Edit to add:  Compare what I've described above to a fully funded women's golf team with 6 full scholarships and often only 8 players on the team plus maybe a walk-on or two...

I would have to think that any scholarship money received to a rowing program needs to be reconciled with the fact that most rowing programs are concentrated in the East Coast, in higher-tuition universities. It's great to say you have a scholarship, but when the tuition still ends up being greater than a good state school, does it really matter?

Actually, for D1 or DII rowers there are 20 scholarships available for women.  None for men.

20 if they're fully funded, less if not.  See my post above...often over 50 girls on a team. Give 4 or 5 fulls to the real stand-outs and there's not a lot left to spread around.

That is true.

21



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

GolfWRX Sponsors