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Trackman numbers/experience with lower compression balls with 90 MPH swing


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#1 rickeyg

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Posted 03 September 2018 - 04:25 PM

Doe's a lower compression ball help with distance?  Thanks.


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#2 The Pearl

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Posted 03 September 2018 - 06:17 PM

My swing speed is in the high 80s, low 90s depending on day and mood.  Despite the marketing by certain ball manufacturers I have never noticed any significant distance difference in low compression balls vs. your standard tour issue ball.  Some people swear by such claims, but I would be willing to bet that there is little statistical evidence to support any claims if rigorous scientific methods were applied.

Sure, some golfer's may experience certain differences, but I suspect much of the perceived advantages of a low compression ball are largely random.  

With that said, there is really no need to split hairs.  You can find lower compression, urethane tour balls for reasonable prices.

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#3 rickeyg

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Posted 03 September 2018 - 06:19 PM

View PostThe Pearl, on 03 September 2018 - 06:17 PM, said:

My swing speed is in the high 80s, low 90s depending on day and mood.  Despite the marketing by certain ball manufacturers I have never noticed any significant distance difference in low compression balls vs. your standard tour issue ball.  Some people swear by such claims, but I would be willing to bet that there is little statistical evidence to support any claims if rigorous scientific methods were applied.

Sure, some golfer's may experience certain differences, but I suspect much of the perceived advantages of a low compression ball are largely random.  

With that said, there is really no need to split hairs.  You can find lower compression, urethane tour balls for reasonable prices.
Thanks.

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#4 North Butte

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Posted 03 September 2018 - 08:10 PM

Not according to Dean Snell (owner of Snell Golf and co-designer of the original ProV1 and the TM Penta, among many others) and not according to Frank Simonetti (designer of the Wilson Staff Duo). Compression is all about feel and has negligible if any effect on distance.
Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses.

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#5 rickeyg

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Posted 03 September 2018 - 08:26 PM

View PostNorth Butte, on 03 September 2018 - 08:10 PM, said:

Not according to Dean Snell (owner of Snell Golf and co-designer of the original ProV1 and the TM Penta, among many others) and not according to Frank Simonetti (designer of the Wilson Staff Duo). Compression is all about feel and has negligible if any effect on distance.
Thanks.


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#6 Golfrnut

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Posted 03 September 2018 - 08:34 PM

Iíve seen better distance in cold temps off clubs like wedges where I can get a little better compression. Off drivers, normal temps, etc...no.
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#7 lawsonman

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Posted 08 September 2018 - 08:28 AM

I've found that many of us average golfers are distance challenged more by spin than compression. If I play a high spin 4 piece ball I'll lose up to a club in distance because of excessive spin. The excessive spin is caused by swing flaws which we all have. Experiment with balls such as the Bridgestone E6 or other lower spinning balls and see if you don't notice a difference. As it's been said before, compression is more about feel.

Edited by lawsonman, 08 September 2018 - 08:29 AM.

Welcome to where dumb opinions are better than no opinion. :)

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#8 lil'mike

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Posted 08 September 2018 - 09:56 AM

View PostGolfrnut, on 03 September 2018 - 08:34 PM, said:

I've seen better distance in cold temps off clubs like wedges where I can get a little better compression. Off drivers, normal temps, etc...no.

I would agree with this and what was mentioned above about too much spin causing yardage loss.  With today's golf balls, I don't think there is much difference.  Now if you played twenty years ago and compared a Strata vs the Pinnacle Gold or old Rockflites (topflites) then yeah there was a yardage difference!  :)

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#9 1badbadger

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Posted 09 September 2018 - 10:55 PM

If compression had no effect on anything but "feel", wouldn't most models be low compression?  The majority of players prefer a soft-feeling ball, so why would manufacturers make high compression balls?

The fact is, compression affects more than just feel.  A lower compression ball will launch higher and spin less off the driver than a higher compression ball.  This is a benefit for many players because a common issue is low launch/high spin.  So a softer ball might produce a more efficient trajectory and reduce the amount the ball curves.

As far as distance is concerned, a firmer ball will usually be longer...if it's hit on the sweet-spot.  If the ball is hit off the sweet-spot, even by a little bit, the lower compression ball will be longer.  As the miss gets further away from the sweet-spot, the bigger the difference.  Because the majority of an average player's shots are not flush, a low compression ball is usually longer day-in and day-out.

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#10 North Butte

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Posted 10 September 2018 - 05:28 AM

View Post1badbadger, on 09 September 2018 - 10:55 PM, said:

If compression had no effect on anything but "feel", wouldn't most models be low compression?  The majority of players prefer a soft-feeling ball, so why would manufacturers make high compression balls?

The fact is, compression affects more than just feel.  A lower compression ball will launch higher and spin less off the driver than a higher compression ball.  This is a benefit for many players because a common issue is low launch/high spin.  So a softer ball might produce a more efficient trajectory and reduce the amount the ball curves.

As far as distance is concerned, a firmer ball will usually be longer...if it's hit on the sweet-spot.  If the ball is hit off the sweet-spot, even by a little bit, the lower compression ball will be longer.  As the miss gets further away from the sweet-spot, the bigger the difference.  Because the majority of an average player's shots are not flush, a low compression ball is usually longer day-in and day-out.

None of what you just said is true but believe what you like.

Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses.

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#11 0psi

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Posted 10 September 2018 - 07:00 PM

What about the other end of the spectrum? Does compression have a greater effect for those of us that swing at 120+mph?

One of the ball review videos on the TXG channel seemed to suggest that at higher swing speeds at least some balls can compress too much causing a little loss in distance. Those guys seem fairly knowledgable so I'd like to think there's some truth to what they're saying.
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#12 1badbadger

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 07:01 AM

View PostNorth Butte, on 10 September 2018 - 05:28 AM, said:

View Post1badbadger, on 09 September 2018 - 10:55 PM, said:

If compression had no effect on anything but "feel", wouldn't most models be low compression?  The majority of players prefer a soft-feeling ball, so why would manufacturers make high compression balls?

The fact is, compression affects more than just feel.  A lower compression ball will launch higher and spin less off the driver than a higher compression ball.  This is a benefit for many players because a common issue is low launch/high spin.  So a softer ball might produce a more efficient trajectory and reduce the amount the ball curves.

As far as distance is concerned, a firmer ball will usually be longer...if it's hit on the sweet-spot.  If the ball is hit off the sweet-spot, even by a little bit, the lower compression ball will be longer.  As the miss gets further away from the sweet-spot, the bigger the difference.  Because the majority of an average player's shots are not flush, a low compression ball is usually longer day-in and day-out.

None of what you just said is true but believe what you like.

Yes, it's absolutely true.  Believe what you like.

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#13 lawsonman

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 07:43 AM

View Post1badbadger, on 11 September 2018 - 07:01 AM, said:

View PostNorth Butte, on 10 September 2018 - 05:28 AM, said:

View Post1badbadger, on 09 September 2018 - 10:55 PM, said:

If compression had no effect on anything but "feel", wouldn't most models be low compression?  The majority of players prefer a soft-feeling ball, so why would manufacturers make high compression balls?

The fact is, compression affects more than just feel.  A lower compression ball will launch higher and spin less off the driver than a higher compression ball.  This is a benefit for many players because a common issue is low launch/high spin.  So a softer ball might produce a more efficient trajectory and reduce the amount the ball curves.

As far as distance is concerned, a firmer ball will usually be longer...if it's hit on the sweet-spot.  If the ball is hit off the sweet-spot, even by a little bit, the lower compression ball will be longer.  As the miss gets further away from the sweet-spot, the bigger the difference.  Because the majority of an average player's shots are not flush, a low compression ball is usually longer day-in and day-out.

None of what you just said is true but believe what you like.

Yes, it's absolutely true.  Believe what you like.

Watch Dean Snell's video's and you'll learn the truth.
Welcome to where dumb opinions are better than no opinion. :)

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#14 Snowman9000

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 07:57 AM

I gain distance with irons with softer balls.  I figure it’s due to lower spin. Essentially like hitting flyers.
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#15 North Butte

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 08:56 AM

View Postlawsonman, on 11 September 2018 - 07:43 AM, said:

View Post1badbadger, on 11 September 2018 - 07:01 AM, said:

View PostNorth Butte, on 10 September 2018 - 05:28 AM, said:

View Post1badbadger, on 09 September 2018 - 10:55 PM, said:

If compression had no effect on anything but "feel", wouldn't most models be low compression?  The majority of players prefer a soft-feeling ball, so why would manufacturers make high compression balls?

The fact is, compression affects more than just feel.  A lower compression ball will launch higher and spin less off the driver than a higher compression ball.  This is a benefit for many players because a common issue is low launch/high spin.  So a softer ball might produce a more efficient trajectory and reduce the amount the ball curves.

As far as distance is concerned, a firmer ball will usually be longer...if it's hit on the sweet-spot.  If the ball is hit off the sweet-spot, even by a little bit, the lower compression ball will be longer.  As the miss gets further away from the sweet-spot, the bigger the difference.  Because the majority of an average player's shots are not flush, a low compression ball is usually longer day-in and day-out.

None of what you just said is true but believe what you like.

Yes, it's absolutely true.  Believe what you like.

Watch Dean Snell's video's and you'll learn the truth.

Or the ones from Frank Simonetti (sp?) from Wilson.

Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses.

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#16 ghoul31

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 09:48 AM

I would rather see real numbers, rather that Dean Snell running his mouth with nothing to back it up

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#17 North Butte

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 09:59 AM

View Postghoul31, on 11 September 2018 - 09:48 AM, said:

I would rather see real numbers, rather that Dean Snell running his mouth with nothing to back it up

And so what "back it up" is there for some doofus on an anonymous Internet forum pontificating about his imaginary golf ball physics?

I think I'll believe the two guys with a few dozen golf-ball patents between them, myself. But maybe that's just me.

P.S. Spend 20 minutes on Google and you'll find the numbers Frank Simonetti published answering your question. But I know you won't believe that either because it conflicts with your fantasies.

Edited by North Butte, 11 September 2018 - 10:01 AM.

Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses.

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#18 Golfrnut

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 10:02 AM

View Postghoul31, on 11 September 2018 - 09:48 AM, said:

I would rather see real numbers, rather that Dean Snell running his mouth with nothing to back it up


Plenty out there already...launch monitors are an easy way to record ball speed and we have been able to do that for years.  Same for spin and all the other launch conditions.  There's not enough depreciable differences with today's balls to be noticeable on course.  From a physics standpoint, I am sure there are differences as deformation of the golf ball will cause energy potential to decrease (same reason we have flexing faces on high COR clubs), but ball designers are also very smart and know what they are doing.
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#19 ghoul31

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Posted 11 September 2018 - 10:30 AM


Here are some real numbers

At slow swing speeds the longest balls were balls like Srixon soft feel ladies, pinacle platinum feel




110 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Pinnacle Gold FX Long312.93 (1)5.67 (16)Taylor Made TP Black311.95 (2)12.40 (62)Callaway HX Pearl308.58 (3)12.36 (61)Srixon Z-URC307.57 (4)5.27 (10)Titleist Pro V1x307.54 (5)7.17 (33)
The average ball at this speed traveled 300.52 yards. The shortest ball went only 282.97 yards. From the longest ball to the shortest ball, the difference is nearly 30 yards! Remember, these were all hit with the exact same driver and the exact same swing every time.


100 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Titleist Pro V1x280.51 (1)5.17 (18)Pinnacle Gold FX Long280.40 (2)4.20 (10)Callaway HX Pearl279.71 (3)8.04 (52)Taylor Made TP Black279.43 (4)8.27 (55)Nike One Black279.39 (5)6.08 (35)

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The average ball at this speed traveled 273.83 yards. The shortest ball went 261.06 yards.


90 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Callaway HX Pearl246.18 (1)8.91 (55)Bridgestone B330245.03 (2)4.84 (4)Titleist Pro V1x244.97 (3)9.38 (59)Top Flite XL 5000 Straight244.79 (4)5.96 (16)Pinnacle Gold FX Long244.26 (5)8.25 (49)
The average ball at this speed traveled 240.73 yards. The shortest ball went 230.75 yards.


80 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Volvik Crystal Control208.48 (1)3.12 (11)Srixon Soft Feel Ladies208.29 (2)4.79 (38)Top Flite D2 Straight207.24 (3)1.90 (2)Callaway HX Pearl207.05 (4)3.53 (16)Bridgestone B330S207.00 (5)3.73 (18)
The average ball at this speed traveled 204.01 yards. The shortest ball went 194.56 yards.


70 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all the balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Titleist DT Carry175.91 (1)5.02 (53)Pinnacle Platinum Feel175.36 (2)5.15 (54)Srixon AD333175.07 (3)5.80 (60)Callaway Tour i174.57 (4)3.31 (16)Bridgestone E5+174.32 (5)3.83 (30)
The average ball at this speed traveled 171.64 yards. The shortest ball went 160.98 yards.


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#20 The Pearl

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 03:03 PM

View Postghoul31, on 11 September 2018 - 10:30 AM, said:


Here are some real numbers
At slow swing speeds the longest balls were balls like Srixon soft feel ladies, pinacle platinum feel



110 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Pinnacle Gold FX Long312.93 (1)5.67 (16)Taylor Made TP Black311.95 (2)12.40 (62)Callaway HX Pearl308.58 (3)12.36 (61)Srixon Z-URC307.57 (4)5.27 (10)Titleist Pro V1x307.54 (5)7.17 (33)
The average ball at this speed traveled 300.52 yards. The shortest ball went only 282.97 yards. From the longest ball to the shortest ball, the difference is nearly 30 yards! Remember, these were all hit with the exact same driver and the exact same swing every time.


100 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Titleist Pro V1x280.51 (1)5.17 (18)Pinnacle Gold FX Long280.40 (2)4.20 (10)Callaway HX Pearl279.71 (3)8.04 (52)Taylor Made TP Black279.43 (4)8.27 (55)Nike One Black279.39 (5)6.08 (35)

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The average ball at this speed traveled 273.83 yards. The shortest ball went 261.06 yards.


90 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Callaway HX Pearl246.18 (1)8.91 (55)Bridgestone B330245.03 (2)4.84 (4)Titleist Pro V1x244.97 (3)9.38 (59)Top Flite XL 5000 Straight244.79 (4)5.96 (16)Pinnacle Gold FX Long244.26 (5)8.25 (49)
The average ball at this speed traveled 240.73 yards. The shortest ball went 230.75 yards.


80 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all 63 balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Volvik Crystal Control208.48 (1)3.12 (11)Srixon Soft Feel Ladies208.29 (2)4.79 (38)Top Flite D2 Straight207.24 (3)1.90 (2)Callaway HX Pearl207.05 (4)3.53 (16)Bridgestone B330S207.00 (5)3.73 (18)
The average ball at this speed traveled 204.01 yards. The shortest ball went 194.56 yards.


70 MPH Driver
The Top 5 distance balls at this speed were as follows (the data in ( ) indicates the rank vs. all the balls tested)

BallDistance (yards)Deviation (yards)Titleist DT Carry175.91 (1)5.02 (53)Pinnacle Platinum Feel175.36 (2)5.15 (54)Srixon AD333175.07 (3)5.80 (60)Callaway Tour i174.57 (4)3.31 (16)Bridgestone E5+174.32 (5)3.83 (30)
The average ball at this speed traveled 171.64 yards. The shortest ball went 160.98 yards.



You realize that some of this data disproves your theory?    

First of all, this data and many of the balls are 10 years old.   This data is not even relevant to a "current" discussion on today's golf balls.  Many of the balls in the tests for the 90/80/70 mph are not low compression golf balls relative what is being marketed today.   For instance, the Bridgestone B330 was a straight up tour ball and in the study is only 1.48 yds behind the Volvik at 80MPH.   The same with the Callway Tour I and the Bridgestone E5.  The Callway Tour I was a tour ball and the E5 was a two piece urethane.  Neither was marketed as  a "Low compression" golf ball for slow swing speed players.

You also have the ProV1X less than 2 yds behind the Callaway HX Pearl at 90 MPH which literally disproves your entire argument.


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#21 North Butte

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 03:14 PM

View PostThe Pearl, on 18 September 2018 - 03:03 PM, said:

The same with the Callway Tour I and the Bridgestone E5.  The Callway Tour I was a tour ball and the E5 was a two piece urethane.  Neither was marketed as  a "Low compression" golf ball for slow swing speed players.

And those two particular models were absolute rocks even relative to other balls of their generation!
Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses.

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#22 The Pearl

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Posted 18 September 2018 - 05:20 PM

View PostNorth Butte, on 18 September 2018 - 03:14 PM, said:

View PostThe Pearl, on 18 September 2018 - 03:03 PM, said:

The same with the Callway Tour I and the Bridgestone E5.  The Callway Tour I was a tour ball and the E5 was a two piece urethane.  Neither was marketed as  a "Low compression" golf ball for slow swing speed players.

And those two particular models were absolute rocks even relative to other balls of their generation!

The Tour Ix was even worse.

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#23 trackcoach13

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 07:01 AM

View Postghoul31, on 11 September 2018 - 09:48 AM, said:

I would rather see real numbers, rather that Dean Snell running his mouth with nothing to back it up
I nominate this as the dumbest post...ever.
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#24 Celeras

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 12:25 PM

The myth has been gone over ad nauseum. Frequently in response to badbadger, who I've seen parrot this misinformation more than once. Always be skeptical of the "this is what I think and I have no data to back it up" crowd.

cor-impact-velocity.png

C.O.R. is a measure of the energy retained during a collision (such as a club/ball collision), which correlates to the expected velocity at different clubhead speeds.

Of all the things that determine distance, compression is not one of them. End of story.

Edited by Celeras, 19 September 2018 - 12:28 PM.

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#25 Golfrnut

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 12:34 PM

I agree with the above, so hopefully this doesn't get misinterpreted.

There are some studies (not smart enough to challenge accuracy/potential errors in data collection) that suggest that compression vs temp will create some distance differences as we go cold/hot.  From the data I have seen, hotter temps seem to effect the ball more than the colder temps do, which is contrary to what most would tend to think.

Edit:  This is referring to ball temp, not ambient

Edited by Golfrnut, 19 September 2018 - 12:35 PM.

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#26 North Butte

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 12:37 PM

View PostGolfrnut, on 19 September 2018 - 12:34 PM, said:

I agree with the above, so hopefully this doesn't get misinterpreted.

There are some studies (not smart enough to challenge accuracy/potential errors in data collection) that suggest that compression vs temp will create some distance differences as we go cold/hot.  From the data I have seen, hotter temps seem to effect the ball more than the colder temps do, which is contrary to what most would tend to think.

But hot or cold does not affect high-compression or low-compression balls differently. I believe it was Frank Simonuetti who also published graphs showing how the distance-vs-temperature relationship is the same regardless of "compression".

If you normally play a high compression ball it will not go as far when the ball and the atmosphere get cold. But you can't regain any of that distance loss by switching to a lower compression ball. Low compression balls are equally affected by the cold temps.
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#27 Z1ggy16

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 12:42 PM

View PostCeleras, on 19 September 2018 - 12:25 PM, said:

The myth has been gone over ad nauseum. Frequently in response to badbadger, who I've seen parrot this misinformation more than once. Always be skeptical of the "this is what I think and I have no data to back it up" crowd.

Attachment cor-impact-velocity.png

C.O.R. is a measure of the energy retained during a collision (such as a club/ball collision), which correlates to the expected velocity at different clubhead speeds.

Of all the things that determine distance, compression is not one of them. End of story.
ahhh I was wondering where this graph went. When I saw the other thread on this topic I immediately  recalled this test. Good post.

And FWIW I tend to play softer lower spin balls in the spring/winter, but not because I think compression makes a difference but because I was a little lower spin to help with roll out on the softer greens, and to gain back a few yards due to lower spin on my irons from the lower temps and slower CHS that I tend to have in those months.
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#28 Golfrnut

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 12:49 PM

View PostNorth Butte, on 19 September 2018 - 12:37 PM, said:

View PostGolfrnut, on 19 September 2018 - 12:34 PM, said:

I agree with the above, so hopefully this doesn't get misinterpreted.

There are some studies (not smart enough to challenge accuracy/potential errors in data collection) that suggest that compression vs temp will create some distance differences as we go cold/hot.  From the data I have seen, hotter temps seem to effect the ball more than the colder temps do, which is contrary to what most would tend to think.

But hot or cold does not affect high-compression or low-compression balls differently. I believe it was Frank Simonuetti who also published graphs showing how the distance-vs-temperature relationship is the same regardless of "compression".

If you normally play a high compression ball it will not go as far when the ball and the atmosphere get cold. But you can't regain any of that distance loss by switching to a lower compression ball. Low compression balls are equally affected by the cold temps.

Maybe I should have worded that differently, and not targeted compression directly as the defining factor.  Different ball compositions are most likely going to react differently to temperature, so perhaps a better representation would be to attribute it to that than the compression numbers?
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#29 North Butte

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 12:54 PM

View PostGolfrnut, on 19 September 2018 - 12:49 PM, said:

View PostNorth Butte, on 19 September 2018 - 12:37 PM, said:

View PostGolfrnut, on 19 September 2018 - 12:34 PM, said:

I agree with the above, so hopefully this doesn't get misinterpreted.

There are some studies (not smart enough to challenge accuracy/potential errors in data collection) that suggest that compression vs temp will create some distance differences as we go cold/hot.  From the data I have seen, hotter temps seem to effect the ball more than the colder temps do, which is contrary to what most would tend to think.

But hot or cold does not affect high-compression or low-compression balls differently. I believe it was Frank Simonuetti who also published graphs showing how the distance-vs-temperature relationship is the same regardless of "compression".

If you normally play a high compression ball it will not go as far when the ball and the atmosphere get cold. But you can't regain any of that distance loss by switching to a lower compression ball. Low compression balls are equally affected by the cold temps.

Maybe I should have worded that differently, and not targeted compression directly as the defining factor.  Different ball compositions are most likely going to react differently to temperature, so perhaps a better representation would be to attribute it to that than the compression numbers?

It simply can't be done. There aren't good cold-weather balls and good hot-weather balls.

Now maybe like friend Z1ggy16 you're looking for a different type of ball performance during the winter and summer. But when he switches to a lower spin ball in the winter it's not that the ball's spin is lower due to the cold.

No matter how a ball is constructed, the effect of temperature is very much the same. Note that I'm not talking about rubber-band wound balls with with natural rubber covers but about various types of modern construction balls.

P.S. If it were physically possible to make a golf ball that has superior cold-weather performance, you'd better believe someone would be making and selling it!

Edited by North Butte, 19 September 2018 - 12:55 PM.

Everything has its drawbacks, as the man said when his mother-in-law died, and they came down upon him for the funeral expenses.

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#30 Golfrnut

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Posted 19 September 2018 - 01:07 PM

View PostNorth Butte, on 19 September 2018 - 12:54 PM, said:

View PostGolfrnut, on 19 September 2018 - 12:49 PM, said:

View PostNorth Butte, on 19 September 2018 - 12:37 PM, said:

View PostGolfrnut, on 19 September 2018 - 12:34 PM, said:

I agree with the above, so hopefully this doesn't get misinterpreted.

There are some studies (not smart enough to challenge accuracy/potential errors in data collection) that suggest that compression vs temp will create some distance differences as we go cold/hot.  From the data I have seen, hotter temps seem to effect the ball more than the colder temps do, which is contrary to what most would tend to think.

But hot or cold does not affect high-compression or low-compression balls differently. I believe it was Frank Simonuetti who also published graphs showing how the distance-vs-temperature relationship is the same regardless of "compression".

If you normally play a high compression ball it will not go as far when the ball and the atmosphere get cold. But you can't regain any of that distance loss by switching to a lower compression ball. Low compression balls are equally affected by the cold temps.

Maybe I should have worded that differently, and not targeted compression directly as the defining factor.  Different ball compositions are most likely going to react differently to temperature, so perhaps a better representation would be to attribute it to that than the compression numbers?

It simply can't be done. There aren't good cold-weather balls and good hot-weather balls.

Now maybe like friend Z1ggy16 you're looking for a different type of ball performance during the winter and summer. But when he switches to a lower spin ball in the winter it's not that the ball's spin is lower due to the cold.

No matter how a ball is constructed, the effect of temperature is very much the same. Note that I'm not talking about rubber-band wound balls with with natural rubber covers but about various types of modern construction balls.

P.S. If it were physically possible to make a golf ball that has superior cold-weather performance, you'd better believe someone would be making and selling it!

I'm not all that sure I agree with that.  Not terribly long ago, I saw at least one study out there that differed from that conclusion as well.  I will have to search around to try and find it again.  There are people like the makers of Vice that have information posted on their site that don't necassarily agree with that as well.  There is good reason why ball manufacturers have suggested temps for storage and when you can expect peak vs degraded performance.

https://www.vicegolf...-storage-myths/

I'll look around again for the paper that was done on it.

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