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Do top golfers typically have parents who play?


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#1 TigerMom

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 05:09 AM

How important is it for kids playing golf to have parents who play?

And if a parent plays, does it matter if they are good or not?

My husband does not play golf at all and I only play casually a few times a year (and have never broken100).

I donít really have interest in golf myself but would consider taking lessons to improve in order to play with my daughter if it mattered for her development


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#2 darter79

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 06:39 AM

you don't have to be great but you have to have an understanding in order to guide your junior golfer. Coaches are great to help them but they can't be with them every practice. I use my daughters coaches as a way to improve my knowledge in order to help my daughter more. I by know means was a great golfer, I shot in the 80s when play. There is an age that it doesn't matter as at some point they have to talk full ownership of their own skill and game.

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#3 dpb5031

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM

I spent quite a few years around junior golf, from the local US Kids scene to the highest level AJGA invitationals and USGA national championships. The answer is that you see some of both and it's really not important.

In my case I'm a low handicap player and the club champion at our golf club.  I got my daughter started at around age 10 (she is a collegiate player now).  I was not her swing coach, but knowledgeable enough to keep a watchful eye on her swing and how to vett out a good instructor.  I was just knowledgeable enough to know that even though I was a pretty good player, I wasn't qualified to be a swing coach.

Many parents of top junior players dont play at all, and many more play a little but are not very good.  It's really not important.

When my daughter was younger and developing as a player I almost never played along with her even though I love the game.  Most times I wouldn't even bring my clubs, I'd just walk with her or drive the cart. It was all about her, and for me to play along wasn't productive or enjoyable for either of us. In fact we've just recently started enjoying the game together often playing matches against my buddies who are mostly good single digit handicaps.  We've been having good fun with it this summer and even won our state's mixed partners championship.

The worst are the parents who can't play a lick and have no idea what they're talking about, yet feel compelled to bark instruction (usually bad advice) to their kids after every swing.  I've seen lots of that.

Edited by dpb5031, 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM.

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#4 JimDiGritz

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 06:55 AM

Hi TigerMom, my son has been improving quickly since starting playing 2 years ago - he's now 12 and plays every week and practices almost every day. I don't play and my wife has taken maybe 2 lessons.

I can't speak for the parents of the elite/phenoms out there but I can say that the kids have to love the game and have parents who can support them.

If your daughter is really getting interested I would find a local course with a junior academy or coaching - that way they will start to meet other juniors and will be able to book tee-times to play together - I tend to walk round with him and sometimes caddy if he gets tired during the 18 holes but I don't play and never really give any golfing advice. In fact I'll either just congratulate/commiserate, chat about life or once in a while ask him "What do you think went wrong there?" or "Why did you choose that club?" just to get him to think through his approach.

Would me being a good golfer help his development? Maybe, but the way I see it is that unless I'm a very good teacher and/or PGA certified I would still need get him lessons and coaching etc. Plus a lot of the fathers that play regularly seem to spend less time on the course with their kids because on the weekend they're playing in a Medal or senior game...

Edited by JimDiGritz, 20 June 2018 - 06:58 AM.


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#5 tiger1873

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 08:03 AM

I don't think it matters in the long run.  I do think that very good golfers with low handicap golfers tend to teach there kids too much though.  When kids are younger it's absolutely an advantage to be a good golfer because you are the caddy for the kids and can help read putts and so forth. Development is going to be much faster too. When kids are under 12 they simply are not going to be mature enough to ask what they need from an instructor and both the parents and kids may not know how to score lower yet.

Later on though I think it may be a disadvantage because those same golfers give too much advice and as a result there not seeking advice from people who may actually be able to help.  

I am only an average golfer out there so I pretty much know I have to seek out people who can help my kids.

Edited by tiger1873, 20 June 2018 - 08:09 AM.


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#6 heavy_hitter

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 08:34 AM

View Postdpb5031, on 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM, said:

I spent quite a few years around junior golf, from the local US Kids scene to the highest level AJGA invitationals and USGA national championships. The answer is that you see some of both and it's really not important.

In my case I'm a low handicap player and the club champion at our golf club.  I got my daughter started at around age 10 (she is a collegiate player now).  I was not her swing coach, but knowledgeable enough to keep a watchful eye on her swing and how to vett out a good instructor.  I was just knowledgeable enough to know that even though I was a pretty good player, I wasn't qualified to be a swing coach.

Many parents of top junior players dont play at all, and many more play a little but are not very good.  It's really not important.

When my daughter was younger and developing as a player I almost never played along with her even though I love the game.  Most times I wouldn't even bring my clubs, I'd just walk with her or drive the cart. It was all about her, and for me to play along wasn't productive or enjoyable for either of us. In fact we've just recently started enjoying the game together often playing matches against my buddies who are mostly good single digit handicaps.  We've been having good fun with it this summer and even won our state's mixed partners championship.

The worst are the parents who can't play a lick and have no idea what they're talking about, yet feel compelled to bark instruction (usually bad advice) to their kids after every swing.  I've seen lots of that.

This is just like me except I stink at golf.  I put down the clubs to make it about my kids.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 20 June 2018 - 08:34 AM.


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#7 leezer99

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 09:00 AM

View PostTigerMom, on 20 June 2018 - 05:09 AM, said:

How important is it for kids playing golf to have parents who play?

And if a parent plays, does it matter if they are good or not?

My husband does not play golf at all and I only play casually a few times a year (and have never broken100).

I don't really have interest in golf myself but would consider taking lessons to improve in order to play with my daughter if it mattered for her development

Did Ronaldo's parents play soccer?  Nope, mom was a cook and dad was a gardener.  

How about Simone Biles?  Mom was a drug addict and dad wasn't around.  Her adoptive parents were a nurse and an air traffic controller.  Discovered gymnastics at 6 years old at a day camp.

Usain Bolt must have had elite level sprinters in his family, right? Nope, the only thing they ran was a local grocery store.

Bill Gates?  Pretty sure software architects weren't even a thing before then.

Did their parents support and sacrifice for their kids to follow their dreams?  Undoubtedly.

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#8 Redjeep83

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 09:32 AM

most I've seen can't play a lick of sports and live their dreams through the kid. Good to get them into sports and introduce and lead the way but many push too hard

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM, said:

I spent quite a few years around junior golf, from the local US Kids scene to the highest level AJGA invitationals and USGA national championships. The answer is that you see some of both and it's really not important.

In my case I'm a low handicap player and the club champion at our golf club.  I got my daughter started at around age 10 (she is a collegiate player now).  I was not her swing coach, but knowledgeable enough to keep a watchful eye on her swing and how to vett out a good instructor.  I was just knowledgeable enough to know that even though I was a pretty good player, I wasn't qualified to be a swing coach.

Many parents of top junior players dont play at all, and many more play a little but are not very good.  It's really not important.

When my daughter was younger and developing as a player I almost never played along with her even though I love the game.  Most times I wouldn't even bring my clubs, I'd just walk with her or drive the cart. It was all about her, and for me to play along wasn't productive or enjoyable for either of us. In fact we've just recently started enjoying the game together often playing matches against my buddies who are mostly good single digit handicaps.  We've been having good fun with it this summer and even won our state's mixed partners championship.

The worst are the parents who can't play a lick and have no idea what they're talking about, yet feel compelled to bark instruction (usually bad advice) to their kids after every swing.  I've seen lots of that.

This is just like me except I stink at golf.  I put down the clubs to make it about my kids.

I would of never guessed that...

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#9 heavy_hitter

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 09:49 AM

View PostRedjeep83, on 20 June 2018 - 09:32 AM, said:

most I've seen can't play a lick of sports and live their dreams through the kid. Good to get them into sports and introduce and lead the way but many push too hard

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM, said:

I spent quite a few years around junior golf, from the local US Kids scene to the highest level AJGA invitationals and USGA national championships. The answer is that you see some of both and it's really not important.

In my case I'm a low handicap player and the club champion at our golf club.  I got my daughter started at around age 10 (she is a collegiate player now).  I was not her swing coach, but knowledgeable enough to keep a watchful eye on her swing and how to vett out a good instructor.  I was just knowledgeable enough to know that even though I was a pretty good player, I wasn't qualified to be a swing coach.

Many parents of top junior players dont play at all, and many more play a little but are not very good.  It's really not important.

When my daughter was younger and developing as a player I almost never played along with her even though I love the game.  Most times I wouldn't even bring my clubs, I'd just walk with her or drive the cart. It was all about her, and for me to play along wasn't productive or enjoyable for either of us. In fact we've just recently started enjoying the game together often playing matches against my buddies who are mostly good single digit handicaps.  We've been having good fun with it this summer and even won our state's mixed partners championship.

The worst are the parents who can't play a lick and have no idea what they're talking about, yet feel compelled to bark instruction (usually bad advice) to their kids after every swing.  I've seen lots of that.

This is just like me except I stink at golf.  I put down the clubs to make it about my kids.

I would of never guessed that...

This post makes little to no sense.  Most kids that get into sports get into sports because of their parents.  While there are parents that push too hard, that isn't the majority of parents.

My son has played football, basketball, and baseball.  All sports that I excelled at.  He loves golf and has so since an early age.  He just started watching Golf Channel on his own and fell in love with the sport.  Early on he showed that he was a better golfer locally than the other kids his age and a few years older.  I never played golf growing up.  Would hit the course once or twice during the summers with my dad.  Never had a love or appreciation for it.  My kid showed me that love and appreciation.  If I had it my way, my kid would still be playing football, but that  isn't what he wants to do.  So we sacrifice for him to buy great instruction and a trainer so he can live his dreams.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 20 June 2018 - 09:51 AM.


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#10 tiger1873

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 11:05 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 09:49 AM, said:

This post makes little to no sense.  Most kids that get into sports get into sports because of their parents.  While there are parents that push too hard, that isn't the majority of parents.

My son has played football, basketball, and baseball.  All sports that I excelled at.  He loves golf and has so since an early age.  He just started watching Golf Channel on his own and fell in love with the sport.  Early on he showed that he was a better golfer locally than the other kids his age and a few years older.  I never played golf growing up.  Would hit the course once or twice during the summers with my dad.  Never had a love or appreciation for it.  My kid showed me that love and appreciation.  If I had it my way, my kid would still be playing football, but that  isn't what he wants to do.  So we sacrifice for him to buy great instruction and a trainer so he can live his dreams.

I agree sometimes kids just fall in love with a sport. That is how it was for my Daughter. We put her in all kinds of sports then one day we signed her up for a 1 week golf camp and she never put the club down.  It also was very apparent from her first lesson that she has talent for golf and learning it was easier then other sports for her. It funny how your kids can lead you into something you never really thought about much before.  I am sure a lot people assume parents lead the way but in many cases it is the kids leading the way.

Edited by tiger1873, 20 June 2018 - 11:06 AM.


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#11 hangontight

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 11:15 AM

No doubt that kids are way more inclined to participate in (and thus have a chance to excel in) any given activity that their parents are.  For the most part, I think a parent has the highest level of true influence on a kids upbringing and development.  A kid raised in a CC is much more inclined to play and be good at golf than a kid who is not.  There are always outliers and feel good stories , which give hope to moms telling their kids ďyou can be anything you want to beĒ, haha.  But mostly the odds are stacked against kids to ďbe anything they want to be ďwho are not given opportunities.  That may be a privileged CC upbringing , a middle class parent who is willing to drive their kid to the course, or a poor kid who sneaks on to the local muni across the street.  Golf is tough- for the most part , kids canít just roll down the street to play like they would basketball, someone has to physically bring them to the course and PAY for it.  

Read the Book ďOutliersĒ- some peopleís success is largely based on being at the right place at the right Time (I.e- Francis Ouimet and Bill Gates), of course they had the drive and determination to be winners , but without certain happenstances  falling into place you may never know their names.  Iíve taken the approach to just try to prepare my kids the best way possible (in everything- sports, academics, sociallly,etc) and give them opportunities that I can -ď  success is at the crossroads of preparation and opportunityĒ.....or whatever that qoute is, haha.

Edited by hangontight, 20 June 2018 - 11:16 AM.


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#12 kekoa

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 01:18 PM

As mentioned, I've seen it go both ways.  Some very good kids' parents play golf  while others never touched a club in their life.  I'm personally a low single digit golfer and feel like I have been able to help my son out given my experience playing as well as seeing high level instructors over the years.  Thus far, it has been manageable, but once he reaches 10 or 11 I will definitely turn him over to a professional coach.

Maybe it is me, but I notice that parents who don't play golf are not as hard on their kids.  Parents that do play golf expect their kids to do things that they themselves can't even do.  lol

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#13 BertGA

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 05:52 PM

View Postkekoa, on 20 June 2018 - 01:18 PM, said:

Maybe it is me, but I notice that parents who don't play golf are not as hard on their kids.  Parents that do play golf expect their kids to do things that they themselves can't even do.  lol

I totally know a guy that used to do that.

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#14 heavy_hitter

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 07:49 PM

View Postkekoa, on 20 June 2018 - 01:18 PM, said:

As mentioned, I've seen it go both ways.  Some very good kids' parents play golf  while others never touched a club in their life.  I'm personally a low single digit golfer and feel like I have been able to help my son out given my experience playing as well as seeing high level instructors over the years.  Thus far, it has been manageable, but once he reaches 10 or 11 I will definitely turn him over to a professional coach.

Maybe it is me, but I notice that parents who don't play golf are not as hard on their kids.  Parents that do play golf expect their kids to do things that they themselves can't even do.  lol

I am an ex football/basketball coach.  I have found myself to be too hard on my kids at times and having to back off.  There is a fine line and you have to know when to back off.

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#15 Redjeep83

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 10:38 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 09:49 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 20 June 2018 - 09:32 AM, said:

most I've seen can't play a lick of sports and live their dreams through the kid. Good to get them into sports and introduce and lead the way but many push too hard

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM, said:

I spent quite a few years around junior golf, from the local US Kids scene to the highest level AJGA invitationals and USGA national championships. The answer is that you see some of both and it's really not important.

In my case I'm a low handicap player and the club champion at our golf club.  I got my daughter started at around age 10 (she is a collegiate player now).  I was not her swing coach, but knowledgeable enough to keep a watchful eye on her swing and how to vett out a good instructor.  I was just knowledgeable enough to know that even though I was a pretty good player, I wasn't qualified to be a swing coach.

Many parents of top junior players dont play at all, and many more play a little but are not very good.  It's really not important.

When my daughter was younger and developing as a player I almost never played along with her even though I love the game.  Most times I wouldn't even bring my clubs, I'd just walk with her or drive the cart. It was all about her, and for me to play along wasn't productive or enjoyable for either of us. In fact we've just recently started enjoying the game together often playing matches against my buddies who are mostly good single digit handicaps.  We've been having good fun with it this summer and even won our state's mixed partners championship.

The worst are the parents who can't play a lick and have no idea what they're talking about, yet feel compelled to bark instruction (usually bad advice) to their kids after every swing.  I've seen lots of that.

This is just like me except I stink at golf.  I put down the clubs to make it about my kids.

I would of never guessed that...

This post makes little to no sense.  Most kids that get into sports get into sports because of their parents.  While there are parents that push too hard, that isn't the majority of parents.

My son has played football, basketball, and baseball.  All sports that I excelled at.  He loves golf and has so since an early age.  He just started watching Golf Channel on his own and fell in love with the sport.  Early on he showed that he was a better golfer locally than the other kids his age and a few years older.  I never played golf growing up.  Would hit the course once or twice during the summers with my dad.  Never had a love or appreciation for it.  My kid showed me that love and appreciation.  If I had it my way, my kid would still be playing football, but that  isn't what he wants to do.  So we sacrifice for him to buy great instruction and a trainer so he can live his dreams.

Thought you mentioned you have a daughter in d1 college golf too?

Stand by what I said though, I have seen too many parents pushing their kids when they themselves can't play worth a lick. Guy I see at range I go to who has his kid on some kind of schedule for practice and drills. Honestly feel sorry for the kid, should be there playing golf with friends and having fun. Instead the dad is having him do drills and practice all the time.


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#16 heavy_hitter

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 08:49 AM

View PostRedjeep83, on 20 June 2018 - 10:38 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 09:49 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 20 June 2018 - 09:32 AM, said:

most I've seen can't play a lick of sports and live their dreams through the kid. Good to get them into sports and introduce and lead the way but many push too hard

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM, said:

I spent quite a few years around junior golf, from the local US Kids scene to the highest level AJGA invitationals and USGA national championships. The answer is that you see some of both and it's really not important.

In my case I'm a low handicap player and the club champion at our golf club.  I got my daughter started at around age 10 (she is a collegiate player now).  I was not her swing coach, but knowledgeable enough to keep a watchful eye on her swing and how to vett out a good instructor.  I was just knowledgeable enough to know that even though I was a pretty good player, I wasn't qualified to be a swing coach.

Many parents of top junior players dont play at all, and many more play a little but are not very good.  It's really not important.

When my daughter was younger and developing as a player I almost never played along with her even though I love the game.  Most times I wouldn't even bring my clubs, I'd just walk with her or drive the cart. It was all about her, and for me to play along wasn't productive or enjoyable for either of us. In fact we've just recently started enjoying the game together often playing matches against my buddies who are mostly good single digit handicaps.  We've been having good fun with it this summer and even won our state's mixed partners championship.

The worst are the parents who can't play a lick and have no idea what they're talking about, yet feel compelled to bark instruction (usually bad advice) to their kids after every swing.  I've seen lots of that.

This is just like me except I stink at golf.  I put down the clubs to make it about my kids.

I would of never guessed that...

This post makes little to no sense.  Most kids that get into sports get into sports because of their parents.  While there are parents that push too hard, that isn't the majority of parents.

My son has played football, basketball, and baseball.  All sports that I excelled at.  He loves golf and has so since an early age.  He just started watching Golf Channel on his own and fell in love with the sport.  Early on he showed that he was a better golfer locally than the other kids his age and a few years older.  I never played golf growing up.  Would hit the course once or twice during the summers with my dad.  Never had a love or appreciation for it.  My kid showed me that love and appreciation.  If I had it my way, my kid would still be playing football, but that  isn't what he wants to do.  So we sacrifice for him to buy great instruction and a trainer so he can live his dreams.

Thought you mentioned you have a daughter in d1 college golf too?

Stand by what I said though, I have seen too many parents pushing their kids when they themselves can't play worth a lick. Guy I see at range I go to who has his kid on some kind of schedule for practice and drills. Honestly feel sorry for the kid, should be there playing golf with friends and having fun. Instead the dad is having him do drills and practice all the time.

Yep.  My daughter does play D1.  She didn't even pick up a club until 12.  She was consumed with drama and dance.  Never even decided to take it serious as a sport until she was 13 and a half and in the 8th grade.  The only reason she wanted to play was because her little brother played.

What does playing ability have to do with it?  Isiah Thomas was a great basketball player and crappy coach.  Just because you are good at something doesn't give you the ability to teach or coach the sport.

Coaching is coaching and each kid is different.  Golf is different than other sports.  Other sports to get better you have a coach that puts the kids through drills at practice.  Why should golf be different?  It shouldn't consume the entire time, but golf is time consuming.  If you don't practice and do drills you can't get better.  The key is being able to balance the time spent in drills and the time spent playing.

I understand where you are coming from, but a parent that can't play has nothing to do with it.

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#17 Golfingdawg19

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 08:50 PM

I coached high school golf for 15 years so I know the game pretty well. Both of my kids will argue with me from time to time about instruction. The toughest part I’ve faced is paying someone else to teach them what I already know. The problem is they tune you out as a parent at some point and they will listen to others before they will listen to you. I try and work on drills that reinforce what the swing coach teaches them and we work a lot of short game stuff. I don’t take my clubs to the course because I fill like I need to be helping my kids. I have a hard time sitting back and letting them “figure it out on their own” when I know I can be helping them. My brother is a really good player and he leaves his son alone to practice and only intervenes when he is asked but that isn’t too often. There are tons of different approaches you can take and each child is different. The key is to talk to your child and see what they feel helps them the most. At the end of the day, they will be responsible for how good they get.

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#18 farmer

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 09:59 PM

Johnny Miller's dad played, Jack's dad played, Tom Watson's dad played, Earl played.  What they did was let their kids just play (other than Earl).  JM has spoken about just messing around at Olympic, Jack went out and just played at Scioto.  I'm guessing, but I suspect that a lot of top golfers as a child spent a good bit of time at the course having fun.

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#19 tiger1873

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 10:36 PM

View PostRedjeep83, on 20 June 2018 - 10:38 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 09:49 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 20 June 2018 - 09:32 AM, said:

most I've seen can't play a lick of sports and live their dreams through the kid. Good to get them into sports and introduce and lead the way but many push too hard

View Postheavy_hitter, on 20 June 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

View Postdpb5031, on 20 June 2018 - 06:44 AM, said:

I spent quite a few years around junior golf, from the local US Kids scene to the highest level AJGA invitationals and USGA national championships. The answer is that you see some of both and it's really not important.

In my case I'm a low handicap player and the club champion at our golf club.  I got my daughter started at around age 10 (she is a collegiate player now).  I was not her swing coach, but knowledgeable enough to keep a watchful eye on her swing and how to vett out a good instructor.  I was just knowledgeable enough to know that even though I was a pretty good player, I wasn't qualified to be a swing coach.

Many parents of top junior players dont play at all, and many more play a little but are not very good.  It's really not important.

When my daughter was younger and developing as a player I almost never played along with her even though I love the game.  Most times I wouldn't even bring my clubs, I'd just walk with her or drive the cart. It was all about her, and for me to play along wasn't productive or enjoyable for either of us. In fact we've just recently started enjoying the game together often playing matches against my buddies who are mostly good single digit handicaps.  We've been having good fun with it this summer and even won our state's mixed partners championship.

The worst are the parents who can't play a lick and have no idea what they're talking about, yet feel compelled to bark instruction (usually bad advice) to their kids after every swing.  I've seen lots of that.

This is just like me except I stink at golf.  I put down the clubs to make it about my kids.

I would of never guessed that...

This post makes little to no sense.  Most kids that get into sports get into sports because of their parents.  While there are parents that push too hard, that isn't the majority of parents.

My son has played football, basketball, and baseball.  All sports that I excelled at.  He loves golf and has so since an early age.  He just started watching Golf Channel on his own and fell in love with the sport.  Early on he showed that he was a better golfer locally than the other kids his age and a few years older.  I never played golf growing up.  Would hit the course once or twice during the summers with my dad.  Never had a love or appreciation for it.  My kid showed me that love and appreciation.  If I had it my way, my kid would still be playing football, but that  isn't what he wants to do.  So we sacrifice for him to buy great instruction and a trainer so he can live his dreams.

Thought you mentioned you have a daughter in d1 college golf too?

Stand by what I said though, I have seen too many parents pushing their kids when they themselves can't play worth a lick. Guy I see at range I go to who has his kid on some kind of schedule for practice and drills. Honestly feel sorry for the kid, should be there playing golf with friends and having fun. Instead the dad is having him do drills and practice all the time.

You have to have your kids practice if they want to get better. The other thing not mentioned here is as a parent you have to teach work ethic. How you teach thatís Is different for every kid. But kids need direction from their parents or they may choose to watch tv or play video games all day or something worse like drugs. Scheduling practice is just like homework lots of kids like school but you have to make them still do homework. The parents who leave it to kids to do homework usually have kids that do not do it. Golf is no different And it is the parents job to come up with a schedule.  This especially true of younger kids.

Parents though donít need to know how to play just how to seek help for them.

Edited by tiger1873, 21 June 2018 - 10:40 PM.


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#20 iteachgolf

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 08:00 AM

The top kids I coach all have parents who are involved.  Several donít play at all, in fact all the best kids I teach have parents who donít play with any regularity.  They are supporting their kids but they donít try and coach their kids.  Thereís a fine line between trying to help a kid get better and being overly critical when it comes to a parent.


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#21 Redjeep83

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 09:14 AM

tiger, I was just giving heavy hitter a hard time about saying he can't play, he has very strong opinions in his posts. I agree parents should be involved in guiding them to get better if that is what the kid wants to do. Just bringing out the obvious of parents who get fanatical about their kids in sports, we've all seen if too often

Edited by Redjeep83, 22 June 2018 - 09:15 AM.


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#22 Z1ggy16

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 09:35 AM

I wasn't a junior golfer, but in other sports that I played... all of the best kids usually had parents, and even grand parents who played to a higher level. I think some of it is genes, but mostly has to do with being able to mimic the movements of the parent during practice and also coaching outside of team play.
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#23 Redjeep83

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 09:40 AM

View PostZ1ggy16, on 22 June 2018 - 09:35 AM, said:

I wasn't a junior golfer, but in other sports that I played... all of the best kids usually had parents, and even grand parents who played to a higher level. I think some of it is genes, but mostly has to do with being able to mimic the movements of the parent during practice and also coaching outside of team play.


yea and I think getting the kid playing with others who are good will greatly help them improve, more so than drills and practice all the time. Not sure of any junior groups they can join? In high school they can get part of a team environment

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#24 dpb5031

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 09:56 AM

View PostRedjeep83, on 22 June 2018 - 09:40 AM, said:

View PostZ1ggy16, on 22 June 2018 - 09:35 AM, said:

I wasn't a junior golfer, but in other sports that I played... all of the best kids usually had parents, and even grand parents who played to a higher level. I think some of it is genes, but mostly has to do with being able to mimic the movements of the parent during practice and also coaching outside of team play.


yea and I think getting the kid playing with others who are good will greatly help them improve, more so than drills and practice all the time. Not sure of any junior groups they can join? In high school they can get part of a team environment

I agree that it's typically ideal (except with rare personality types) if kids have peers to play with and share enthusiasm for the game.  That was the main ingredient missing for my daughter through her developmental years.  We belonged to a nice club, but there were no girls her age at that time.  This left us in a situation where I had ended up accompanying her to the course quite often.  I have no doubt my daughter would have enjoyed the game more and probably would have developed into a better player earlier if she had some friends to play/compete against regularly.  She loved when we traveled to big national tournaments with a lot of girls and still has friends from all over the country from junior golf.
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#25 leezer99

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 10:12 AM

View Postdpb5031, on 22 June 2018 - 09:56 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 22 June 2018 - 09:40 AM, said:

View PostZ1ggy16, on 22 June 2018 - 09:35 AM, said:

I wasn't a junior golfer, but in other sports that I played... all of the best kids usually had parents, and even grand parents who played to a higher level. I think some of it is genes, but mostly has to do with being able to mimic the movements of the parent during practice and also coaching outside of team play.


yea and I think getting the kid playing with others who are good will greatly help them improve, more so than drills and practice all the time. Not sure of any junior groups they can join? In high school they can get part of a team environment

I agree that it's typically ideal (except with rare personality types) if kids have peers to play with and share enthusiasm for the game.  That was the main ingredient missing for my daughter through her developmental years.  We belonged to a nice club, but there were no girls her age at that time.  This left us in a situation where I had ended up accompanying her to the course quite often.  I have no doubt my daughter would have enjoyed the game more and probably would have developed into a better player earlier if she had some friends to play/compete against regularly.  She loved when we traveled to big national tournaments with a lot of girls and still has friends from all over the country from junior golf.

One reason we aren't doing US Kids anymore is because my son said he was tired of playing with the same kids every week on the same courses.  Now that we are on the local PGA tour he gets to play a ton of different courses with a bunch of different kids.  Next week the US Kids local tour is at our home course and he doesn't even want to play.


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#26 tiger1873

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 12:03 PM

View Postdpb5031, on 22 June 2018 - 09:56 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 22 June 2018 - 09:40 AM, said:

View PostZ1ggy16, on 22 June 2018 - 09:35 AM, said:

I wasn't a junior golfer, but in other sports that I played... all of the best kids usually had parents, and even grand parents who played to a higher level. I think some of it is genes, but mostly has to do with being able to mimic the movements of the parent during practice and also coaching outside of team play.


yea and I think getting the kid playing with others who are good will greatly help them improve, more so than drills and practice all the time. Not sure of any junior groups they can join? In high school they can get part of a team environment

I agree that it's typically ideal (except with rare personality types) if kids have peers to play with and share enthusiasm for the game.  That was the main ingredient missing for my daughter through her developmental years.  We belonged to a nice club, but there were no girls her age at that time.  This left us in a situation where I had ended up accompanying her to the course quite often.  I have no doubt my daughter would have enjoyed the game more and probably would have developed into a better player earlier if she had some friends to play/compete against regularly.  She loved when we traveled to big national tournaments with a lot of girls and still has friends from all over the country from junior golf.

Yes very common problem especially for girls. It is almost impossible to find another girl the same age at that can play with them and both belong to the same club. If we were still doing  public courses I would seek out courses where there are large junior academies and meet other girls there. We are in a private club now so it doesnít make sense to play public courses for practice.

In the few instances we have tried  playing with other girls it wasnít a good match because they didnít play much and was not on the same level.  On the positive side it does make my girls look forward to playing tournaments with lots of other girls.

Edited by tiger1873, 24 June 2018 - 07:27 PM.


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#27 heavy_hitter

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 08:23 AM

View PostRedjeep83, on 22 June 2018 - 09:14 AM, said:

tiger, I was just giving heavy hitter a hard time about saying he can't play, he has very strong opinions in his posts. I agree parents should be involved in guiding them to get better if that is what the kid wants to do. Just bringing out the obvious of parents who get fanatical about their kids in sports, we've all seen if too often

When I was playing 5 years ago I was shooting high 70's to mid 80's.  I may now pick up a club once maybe twice a year.  I don't play because I choose not to.  If I were to go play tomorrow, I would be terrible.  Wouldn't break 100 more than likely because I haven't played with any regularity.

I have strong opinions because I generally know and understand what happens in youth sports.  I have been around it my entire life.  I also surround myself with people that know and understand golf.  When it comes down to it golf is like any other sport when it comes to coaching.

I do not know the golf swing.  I do not know bio mechanics.  I can't explain what I see in a swing.  I do know how to coach.  Coaching  is teaching someone how to learn rather teaching them.

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#28 Redjeep83

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:02 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 25 June 2018 - 08:23 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 22 June 2018 - 09:14 AM, said:

tiger, I was just giving heavy hitter a hard time about saying he can't play, he has very strong opinions in his posts. I agree parents should be involved in guiding them to get better if that is what the kid wants to do. Just bringing out the obvious of parents who get fanatical about their kids in sports, we've all seen if too often

When I was playing 5 years ago I was shooting high 70's to mid 80's.  I may now pick up a club once maybe twice a year.  I don't play because I choose not to.  If I were to go play tomorrow, I would be terrible.  Wouldn't break 100 more than likely because I haven't played with any regularity.

I have strong opinions because I generally know and understand what happens in youth sports.  I have been around it my entire life.  I also surround myself with people that know and understand golf.  When it comes down to it golf is like any other sport when it comes to coaching.

I do not know the golf swing.  I do not know bio mechanics.  I can't explain what I see in a swing.  I do know how to coach.  Coaching  is teaching someone how to learn rather teaching them.

wait what? back in 2013 you were shooting high 70s. Now you can't break 100? Something doesn't add up.  I can leave the clubs alone for many months at a time and go out and come near my handicap.

Edited by Redjeep83, 25 June 2018 - 10:10 AM.


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#29 tiger1873

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:18 AM

View PostRedjeep83, on 25 June 2018 - 10:02 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 25 June 2018 - 08:23 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 22 June 2018 - 09:14 AM, said:

tiger, I was just giving heavy hitter a hard time about saying he can't play, he has very strong opinions in his posts. I agree parents should be involved in guiding them to get better if that is what the kid wants to do. Just bringing out the obvious of parents who get fanatical about their kids in sports, we've all seen if too often

When I was playing 5 years ago I was shooting high 70's to mid 80's.  I may now pick up a club once maybe twice a year.  I don't play because I choose not to.  If I were to go play tomorrow, I would be terrible.  Wouldn't break 100 more than likely because I haven't played with any regularity.

I have strong opinions because I generally know and understand what happens in youth sports.  I have been around it my entire life.  I also surround myself with people that know and understand golf.  When it comes down to it golf is like any other sport when it comes to coaching.

I do not know the golf swing.  I do not know bio mechanics.  I can't explain what I see in a swing.  I do know how to coach.  Coaching  is teaching someone how to learn rather teaching them.

wait what? back in 2013 you were shooting high 70s. Now you can't break 100? Are you in a wheel chair now or something? I can leave the clubs alone for many months at a time and go out and come near my handicap.

I can tell you that more my kids play the less golf I play and as a result my score goes higher.  I rather make playing golf about them and being with them right now. I can worry about my golf game when they leave home.  I used to be able to break 80 no problem but I would be happy to score 100 today.  I play a lot rounds but at the most I get to play is usually no more then 1 or 2 holes when I out there. Lately I don't even take my clubs out because it just gets in the way.

Also as a parent you spend a lot money on lessons over the years and many times your there when your kids are taking them. You do learn a lot and a big chunk of time you are analyzing your kids game so you do understand a lot about golf.  I don't pretend to understand a golf swing but usually a good instructor will show the parents what they are fixing or trying to accomplish so your not completely clueless about things but certainly know you can't fix it either. I also had cases where the advice to my kids actually helps me as well.



At the end of the day if you play too much golf your kids game will suffer and most us here understand that.

Edited by tiger1873, 25 June 2018 - 10:27 AM.


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#30 heavy_hitter

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Posted 25 June 2018 - 10:20 AM

View PostRedjeep83, on 25 June 2018 - 10:02 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 25 June 2018 - 08:23 AM, said:

View PostRedjeep83, on 22 June 2018 - 09:14 AM, said:

tiger, I was just giving heavy hitter a hard time about saying he can't play, he has very strong opinions in his posts. I agree parents should be involved in guiding them to get better if that is what the kid wants to do. Just bringing out the obvious of parents who get fanatical about their kids in sports, we've all seen if too often

When I was playing 5 years ago I was shooting high 70's to mid 80's.  I may now pick up a club once maybe twice a year.  I don't play because I choose not to.  If I were to go play tomorrow, I would be terrible.  Wouldn't break 100 more than likely because I haven't played with any regularity.

I have strong opinions because I generally know and understand what happens in youth sports.  I have been around it my entire life.  I also surround myself with people that know and understand golf.  When it comes down to it golf is like any other sport when it comes to coaching.

I do not know the golf swing.  I do not know bio mechanics.  I can't explain what I see in a swing.  I do know how to coach.  Coaching  is teaching someone how to learn rather teaching them.

wait what? back in 2013 you were shooting high 70s. Now you can't break 100? Something doesn't add up.  I can leave the clubs alone for many months at a time and go out and come near my handicap.

LOL.... what doesn't add up?  The couple of times I shot high 70's does indicate what my handicap was.  Overachiever and just got hot.   I honestly don't play anymore.  I have hit maybe 10 balls since last August.  Last August was the only time I have played on a course in 2 full years.  

I used to be able to block defensive lineman and score 20 points a game in high school basketball.  Age and wisdom tells me I can't do that anymore either.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 25 June 2018 - 10:21 AM.


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