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Home school for junior golfers


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#1 tiger1873

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 08:06 PM

Does anyone here have there kids homeschool or send their to private schools. Oldest daughter is going to middle school and there is a lot reasons that look for either private or do Home school.  

Is home school going to be an issue when it comes to college if it is then perhaps private is the way to go.


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#2 leezer99

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 08:34 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 16 May 2018 - 08:06 PM, said:

Does anyone here have there kids homeschool or send their to private schools. Oldest daughter is going to middle school and there is a lot reasons that look for either private or do Home school.  

Is home school going to be an issue when it comes to college if it is then perhaps private is the way to go.
Why not both?  

www.oakschristianonline.org

NCAA accredited online private school.

Just have to do your research.

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#3 darter79

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 09:38 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 16 May 2018 - 08:06 PM, said:

Does anyone here have there kids homeschool or send their to private schools. Oldest daughter is going to middle school and there is a lot reasons that look for either private or do Home school.  

Is home school going to be an issue when it comes to college if it is then perhaps private is the way to go.

is this golf related? I mean why?

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#4 leezer99

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 10:26 PM

View Postdarter79, on 16 May 2018 - 09:38 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 16 May 2018 - 08:06 PM, said:

Does anyone here have there kids homeschool or send their to private schools. Oldest daughter is going to middle school and there is a lot reasons that look for either private or do Home school.  

Is home school going to be an issue when it comes to college if it is then perhaps private is the way to go.

is this golf related? I mean why?
The sub is titled Juniors / College Golf. I assumed it was leading to college golf eligibility.

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#5 tiger1873

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 10:44 PM

View Postleezer99, on 16 May 2018 - 10:26 PM, said:

View Postdarter79, on 16 May 2018 - 09:38 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 16 May 2018 - 08:06 PM, said:

Does anyone here have there kids homeschool or send their to private schools. Oldest daughter is going to middle school and there is a lot reasons that look for either private or do Home school.  

Is home school going to be an issue when it comes to college if it is then perhaps private is the way to go.

is this golf related? I mean why?
The sub is titled Juniors / College Golf. I assumed it was leading to college golf eligibility.

I am wondering is home school going to make it harder to get a golf scholarship.

The demands at public school and times makes it harder to practice. You also have to worry about missing school for tournaments as well. Plus I been warned to watch out for PE requirements as they donít care about golf. When I say private schools I am not talk about sending kids to a IMG academy either .  I have noticed a lot of really good private schools also have golf teams and will allow for practice during the day. These schools also have extremely high academic so it would be 1st choice for anyone and golf actually will help them get in. Obviously the issue there is those schools are not cheap either.

Edited by tiger1873, 16 May 2018 - 10:54 PM.


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#6 CTgolf

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Posted 16 May 2018 - 11:36 PM

View Postdarter79, on 16 May 2018 - 09:38 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 16 May 2018 - 08:06 PM, said:

Does anyone here have there kids homeschool or send their to private schools. Oldest daughter is going to middle school and there is a lot reasons that look for either private or do Home school.  

Is home school going to be an issue when it comes to college if it is then perhaps private is the way to go.

is this golf related? I mean why?

A lot of top juniors in many sports are home schooled.  While down in Florida recently I saw a couple of young kids on the practice range of a private club with perfect looking swings being coached by their father.  He mentioned they live in Europe but stay in Florida a few months a year to train (apparently 8 hours a day).  They are both home-schooled via an online program.

The US school system (public and oftentimes even private) is extremely inefficient in education - I think a student could learn all the material taught in schools in half the time if home-schooled

For parents with means and high aspiration for their children, except for a few extremely rigorous academic programs traditional schools should be seen as a means to socialization and not an ideal way to deliver education.

Edited by CTgolf, 16 May 2018 - 11:42 PM.


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#7 agatha

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 12:03 AM

My friends 3 daughters all went on to play college volleyball after being home schooled,  2 went D1-  Denver and USF, the 3rd went D3 just have to make sure its accredited and find out what the requirements are for the targeted schools.

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#8 Llortamaisey

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 08:20 AM

There’s a lot more at play here than just golf practice and education. I would be very careful about homeschooling, especially when considering the psychology of the parent who would be directly involved, for example, a devouring parent. Private sounds like the safer option in my opinion.

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#9 darter79

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 08:34 AM

Okay, I'm probably about to piss some people off so let me apologize in advance.

Are you freaking serious talking about HOME SCHOOLING a kid over GOLF? Over any sport? Yes there are some kids that this works for see Pano great kid, great golfer great person and promotes junior golf better than most.  Is having success that important to you that your willing to sacrifice the fact your kid will no longer be a kid? Golf shouldn't be a job at 9.  School is about education and the things they teach today in my option most parents can't understand ie common core math, the things my 1st grader is learning is something I learned when I was in 3rd grade. Are you qualified to give your kid the correct education with out holding them and their future back over a potential golf future which lets be honest is very unlikely.  EDUCATION should come before sports, and school not just about education lets kids be kids, get in trouble now and again be around their peers to let loose. In our area there are a bunch of home schooled kids and my wife is friends with some. I can say their kids are dubber than a box of rocks and have a reading level below kinder because their parents like  'real word education' not to mention they are very socially awkward. Can some home school successfully, yes but why? You say that some things can be taught in a shorter amount of time might be true but school not just books in education there is a huge social element to it. Your will risk the psychological damage to your child with out a doubt.

Who cares if they can drive it 275 at 12 and hit a wedge inside of 3 feet if they are not well rounded human?? Why does a kid let me say that again a KID need to spend 8 hours a day on a golf course each day at 9? Short answer they DON'T. Let kids be kids. If your kid has talent it will shine. So if your kid has to miss a few days of school for golf, I know I have had to do that with mine and she is 7. Not a big deal at least to her school.  I know I'm probably not the norm but my kid only spends a few hours a week practicing her game (probably about 3 or 4), when her peers at least double that. Is she the best in her local tour no, but she wins enough for only being 7 and only looses by a few strokes each time. Meanwhile we get to do her nails with her and play hide in seek while her fat dad gets stuck somewhere. Wouldn't trade that for anything.

My daughter goes to a private school, why I hate public schools and how they teach. They have a golf team starting in 5th grade I think. Not why she goes its about the education she is getting, the environment she is that goes to my core beliefs. Don't make education or social decisions based on sports. You might as well take your paychecks each week and buy them all into the power ball your odds of developing a LPGA/PGA player might be less.

Once again sorry if I'm pissing anyone off....

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#10 Golfingdawg19

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 08:34 AM

Itea

View Posttiger1873, on 16 May 2018 - 10:44 PM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 16 May 2018 - 10:26 PM, said:

View Postdarter79, on 16 May 2018 - 09:38 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 16 May 2018 - 08:06 PM, said:

Does anyone here have there kids homeschool or send their to private schools. Oldest daughter is going to middle school and there is a lot reasons that look for either private or do Home school.  

Is home school going to be an issue when it comes to college if it is then perhaps private is the way to go.

is this golf related? I mean why?
The sub is titled Juniors / College Golf. I assumed it was leading to college golf eligibility.

I am wondering is home school going to make it harder to get a golf scholarship.

The demands at public school and times makes it harder to practice. You also have to worry about missing school for tournaments as well. Plus I been warned to watch out for PE requirements as they don't care about golf. When I say private schools I am not talk about sending kids to a IMG academy either .  I have noticed a lot of really good private schools also have golf teams and will allow for practice during the day. These schools also have extremely high academic so it would be 1st choice for anyone and golf actually will help them get in. Obviously the issue there is those schools are not cheap either.

I teach at the local high school in my community and I coached high school golf for 15 years. Going to some sort of school (public or private) is very important IMO because kids needs to learn to deal with different personalities. As someone mentioned below, having your parent teach you all day may not be the healthiest thing for a child. Kids who go to school have to learn to deal with all kind of different teachers and that is part of learning how to adapt in society. Another issue is how well can you teach your child when you aren't an expert in that field. If I was trying to teach my son science or math, he would be in trouble. I know that many homeschooled kids do online classes but not everyone learns well in that type of environment. When they go to college they will be siting in a real classroom with a teacher in front of them not on a computer. Throw into all of that, kids who are homeschooled miss out all the best things in high school (Prom, homecoming, football games, etc). I understand the logic most parents have in that if their child isn't practicing all the time, they will get behind other kids. Here is the reality when it comes to any sport: if your child is really good enough to play at an elite level it wont matter that they didn't practice as much as some of the other kids. My son can practice night and day but he isn't going to beat some kid who is a freak athlete like Dustin Johnson and just "out athletes" him. Heavy has mentioned on here many times that his daughter didn't take up golf until 9th grade and she still got a D1 scholarship. Think about all those girls who played since they were 10 years old and didn't get a D1 scholarship. Like I said, the cream will rise to the top when it is all said and done. We have a local kid who has been playing since he was 8. He has done all the US Kid stuff and some of the other World events. He came to our high school his freshman year but at the end of the year decided for his 10th grade year he would enroll in this golf academy. He practices all day long and then takes courses online at night. I saw his mom the other day and she said that it has been a disaster. The coaches at the academy messed his swing up and he has gone backwards. He is going back to his old instructor and will be back at our high school next year. You have to be careful about putting all your eggs in one basket. You want the well rounded kid and if they are good enough, it will work out in the end no matter what age they started or how much the practiced.


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#11 BloctonGolf11

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 08:36 AM

As a public school teacher I am going to try to bite my tongue here on several issues but here is the best perspective I can give.

If you are making a choice on public or private or home school with the focus mainly on golf I think you might want to look at the priorities. The chances of high level golf scholarships are small. Put the priority on education. If you have the means research the private schools in your area but be careful with them as private schools can be absolutely great with amazing educational programs and well certified teachers or they can have major issues with delivery and credentials of their staff and the focus being on non-educational goals. This is a particular issue with the rise of charter schools.

As for homeschooling it will not affect your NCAA eligibility nor recruitment for golf as few golf programs look heavily on your school playing career. They care about individual tournament performance that is unrelated to high school competition. Truly the only sport still reliant on high school performance is football. Research whatever home school program you feel is adequate but again be careful. Would you trust your law affairs with a non specialized person or would you go to someone with training in the field?

I will be honest, as a dedicated and respected educator, my wife and I have made the decision that a high performing, quality public high school is still the best option for long term success. If you can afford the tuition of a high achieving private school you can generally afford to move into a neighborhood with a high performing public school where students are afforded the maximum amount of opportunity. There are exceptions of course and that is where high performing well run private schools exist.

The biggest key is find what is best for your child's overall future, not just golf, and do whatever is necessary for them to be successful.

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

Okay, I'm probably about to piss some people off so let me apologize in advance.

Are you freaking serious talking about HOME SCHOOLING a kid over GOLF? Over any sport? Yes there are some kids that this works for see Pano great kid, great golfer great person and promotes junior golf better than most.  Is having success that important to you that your willing to sacrifice the fact your kid will no longer be a kid? Golf shouldn't be a job at 9.  School is about education and the things they teach today in my option most parents can't understand ie common core math, the things my 1st grader is learning is something I learned when I was in 3rd grade. Are you qualified to give your kid the correct education with out holding them and their future back over a potential golf future which lets be honest is very unlikely.  EDUCATION should come before sports, and school not just about education lets kids be kids, get in trouble now and again be around their peers to let loose. In our area there are a bunch of home schooled kids and my wife is friends with some. I can say their kids are dubber than a box of rocks and have a reading level below kinder because their parents like  'real word education' not to mention they are very socially awkward. Can some home school successfully, yes but why? You say that some things can be taught in a shorter amount of time might be true but school not just books in education there is a huge social element to it. Your will risk the psychological damage to your child with out a doubt.

Who cares if they can drive it 275 at 12 and hit a wedge inside of 3 feet if they are not well rounded human?? Why does a kid let me say that again a KID need to spend 8 hours a day on a golf course each day at 9? Short answer they DON'T. Let kids be kids. If your kid has talent it will shine. So if your kid has to miss a few days of school for golf, I know I have had to do that with mine and she is 7. Not a big deal at least to her school.  I know I'm probably not the norm but my kid only spends a few hours a week practicing her game (probably about 3 or 4), when her peers at least double that. Is she the best in her local tour no, but she wins enough for only being 7 and only looses by a few strokes each time. Meanwhile we get to do her nails with her and play hide in seek while her fat dad gets stuck somewhere. Wouldn't trade that for anything.

My daughter goes to a private school, why I hate public schools and how they teach. They have a golf team starting in 5th grade I think. Not why she goes its about the education she is getting, the environment she is that goes to my core beliefs. Don't make education or social decisions based on sports. You might as well take your paychecks each week and buy them all into the power ball your odds of developing a LPGA/PGA player might be less.

Once again sorry if I'm pissing anyone off....

Different perspective on public schools but nail on the head darter.  Our son will go to the large EXTREMELY high performing public high school in our city for this reason: except for the $40,000 boarding school in the city this public school and several others that are on the same level demolish the private schools in the area in every measurable category.

Edited by BloctonGolf11, 17 May 2018 - 08:38 AM.

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#12 Noles

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 08:48 AM

It's a difficult adjustment for a lot of kids to move away and go to college.  We've all known someone, athlete or not, who went away and didn't handle it well in many ways for just as many reasons.  I really can't imagine what an adjustment it must be to go from being homeschooled for much of your life to now suddenly living away from home AND going to college.  That is a of change at one time.

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#13 darter79

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 09:30 AM

View PostBloctonGolf11, on 17 May 2018 - 08:36 AM, said:

As a public school teacher I am going to try to bite my tongue here on several issues but here is the best perspective I can give.

If you are making a choice on public or private or home school with the focus mainly on golf I think you might want to look at the priorities. The chances of high level golf scholarships are small. Put the priority on education. If you have the means research the private schools in your area but be careful with them as private schools can be absolutely great with amazing educational programs and well certified teachers or they can have major issues with delivery and credentials of their staff and the focus being on non-educational goals. This is a particular issue with the rise of charter schools.

As for homeschooling it will not affect your NCAA eligibility nor recruitment for golf as few golf programs look heavily on your school playing career. They care about individual tournament performance that is unrelated to high school competition. Truly the only sport still reliant on high school performance is football. Research whatever home school program you feel is adequate but again be careful. Would you trust your law affairs with a non specialized person or would you go to someone with training in the field?

I will be honest, as a dedicated and respected educator, my wife and I have made the decision that a high performing, quality public high school is still the best option for long term success. If you can afford the tuition of a high achieving private school you can generally afford to move into a neighborhood with a high performing public school where students are afforded the maximum amount of opportunity. There are exceptions of course and that is where high performing well run private schools exist.

The biggest key is find what is best for your child's overall future, not just golf, and do whatever is necessary for them to be successful.

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

Okay, I'm probably about to piss some people off so let me apologize in advance.

Are you freaking serious talking about HOME SCHOOLING a kid over GOLF? Over any sport? Yes there are some kids that this works for see Pano great kid, great golfer great person and promotes junior golf better than most.  Is having success that important to you that your willing to sacrifice the fact your kid will no longer be a kid? Golf shouldn't be a job at 9.  School is about education and the things they teach today in my option most parents can't understand ie common core math, the things my 1st grader is learning is something I learned when I was in 3rd grade. Are you qualified to give your kid the correct education with out holding them and their future back over a potential golf future which lets be honest is very unlikely.  EDUCATION should come before sports, and school not just about education lets kids be kids, get in trouble now and again be around their peers to let loose. In our area there are a bunch of home schooled kids and my wife is friends with some. I can say their kids are dubber than a box of rocks and have a reading level below kinder because their parents like  'real word education' not to mention they are very socially awkward. Can some home school successfully, yes but why? You say that some things can be taught in a shorter amount of time might be true but school not just books in education there is a huge social element to it. Your will risk the psychological damage to your child with out a doubt.

Who cares if they can drive it 275 at 12 and hit a wedge inside of 3 feet if they are not well rounded human?? Why does a kid let me say that again a KID need to spend 8 hours a day on a golf course each day at 9? Short answer they DON'T. Let kids be kids. If your kid has talent it will shine. So if your kid has to miss a few days of school for golf, I know I have had to do that with mine and she is 7. Not a big deal at least to her school.  I know I'm probably not the norm but my kid only spends a few hours a week practicing her game (probably about 3 or 4), when her peers at least double that. Is she the best in her local tour no, but she wins enough for only being 7 and only looses by a few strokes each time. Meanwhile we get to do her nails with her and play hide in seek while her fat dad gets stuck somewhere. Wouldn't trade that for anything.

My daughter goes to a private school, why I hate public schools and how they teach. They have a golf team starting in 5th grade I think. Not why she goes its about the education she is getting, the environment she is that goes to my core beliefs. Don't make education or social decisions based on sports. You might as well take your paychecks each week and buy them all into the power ball your odds of developing a LPGA/PGA player might be less.

Once again sorry if I'm pissing anyone off....

Different perspective on public schools but nail on the head darter.  Our son will go to the large EXTREMELY high performing public high school in our city for this reason: except for the $40,000 boarding school in the city this public school and several others that are on the same level demolish the private schools in the area in every measurable category.

There are some GREAT public schools in our area but the one we would be routed to is sub-par, plus private education give my daughter public school won't -  a faith based education which is something we teach at home but won't get additional in public. Our local public school is a joke. Nothing against great public schools but private fits our belief system a little better.

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#14 BrianMcG

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 09:38 AM

A lot of people here who know nothing about homeschool talking about homeschool. Hilarious.

Maybe some of you should educate yourself about homechooling.

The OP didnít suggest he was going to be keeping his kid locked in a basement.

Edited by BrianMcG, 17 May 2018 - 09:39 AM.


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#15 BloctonGolf11

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 09:39 AM

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 09:30 AM, said:

View PostBloctonGolf11, on 17 May 2018 - 08:36 AM, said:

As a public school teacher I am going to try to bite my tongue here on several issues but here is the best perspective I can give.

If you are making a choice on public or private or home school with the focus mainly on golf I think you might want to look at the priorities. The chances of high level golf scholarships are small. Put the priority on education. If you have the means research the private schools in your area but be careful with them as private schools can be absolutely great with amazing educational programs and well certified teachers or they can have major issues with delivery and credentials of their staff and the focus being on non-educational goals. This is a particular issue with the rise of charter schools.

As for homeschooling it will not affect your NCAA eligibility nor recruitment for golf as few golf programs look heavily on your school playing career. They care about individual tournament performance that is unrelated to high school competition. Truly the only sport still reliant on high school performance is football. Research whatever home school program you feel is adequate but again be careful. Would you trust your law affairs with a non specialized person or would you go to someone with training in the field?

I will be honest, as a dedicated and respected educator, my wife and I have made the decision that a high performing, quality public high school is still the best option for long term success. If you can afford the tuition of a high achieving private school you can generally afford to move into a neighborhood with a high performing public school where students are afforded the maximum amount of opportunity. There are exceptions of course and that is where high performing well run private schools exist.

The biggest key is find what is best for your child's overall future, not just golf, and do whatever is necessary for them to be successful.

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

Okay, I'm probably about to piss some people off so let me apologize in advance.

Are you freaking serious talking about HOME SCHOOLING a kid over GOLF? Over any sport? Yes there are some kids that this works for see Pano great kid, great golfer great person and promotes junior golf better than most.  Is having success that important to you that your willing to sacrifice the fact your kid will no longer be a kid? Golf shouldn't be a job at 9.  School is about education and the things they teach today in my option most parents can't understand ie common core math, the things my 1st grader is learning is something I learned when I was in 3rd grade. Are you qualified to give your kid the correct education with out holding them and their future back over a potential golf future which lets be honest is very unlikely.  EDUCATION should come before sports, and school not just about education lets kids be kids, get in trouble now and again be around their peers to let loose. In our area there are a bunch of home schooled kids and my wife is friends with some. I can say their kids are dubber than a box of rocks and have a reading level below kinder because their parents like  'real word education' not to mention they are very socially awkward. Can some home school successfully, yes but why? You say that some things can be taught in a shorter amount of time might be true but school not just books in education there is a huge social element to it. Your will risk the psychological damage to your child with out a doubt.

Who cares if they can drive it 275 at 12 and hit a wedge inside of 3 feet if they are not well rounded human?? Why does a kid let me say that again a KID need to spend 8 hours a day on a golf course each day at 9? Short answer they DON'T. Let kids be kids. If your kid has talent it will shine. So if your kid has to miss a few days of school for golf, I know I have had to do that with mine and she is 7. Not a big deal at least to her school.  I know I'm probably not the norm but my kid only spends a few hours a week practicing her game (probably about 3 or 4), when her peers at least double that. Is she the best in her local tour no, but she wins enough for only being 7 and only looses by a few strokes each time. Meanwhile we get to do her nails with her and play hide in seek while her fat dad gets stuck somewhere. Wouldn't trade that for anything.

My daughter goes to a private school, why I hate public schools and how they teach. They have a golf team starting in 5th grade I think. Not why she goes its about the education she is getting, the environment she is that goes to my core beliefs. Don't make education or social decisions based on sports. You might as well take your paychecks each week and buy them all into the power ball your odds of developing a LPGA/PGA player might be less.

Once again sorry if I'm pissing anyone off....

Different perspective on public schools but nail on the head darter.  Our son will go to the large EXTREMELY high performing public high school in our city for this reason: except for the $40,000 boarding school in the city this public school and several others that are on the same level demolish the private schools in the area in every measurable category.

There are some GREAT public schools in our area but the one we would be routed to is sub-par, plus private education give my daughter public school won't -  a faith based education which is something we teach at home but won't get additional in public. Our local public school is a joke. Nothing against great public schools but private fits our belief system a little better.

Totally understand. We are the exact opposite as we do not want our children's education mixed with religious teachings. There are some really good religious based private schools around our area but we do not want him going there. Sadly, the three secular private schools in the are all VERY good but are also all $30,000+ per year so it is more economically feasible to move to one of the VERY high performing public schools in our area.  Either way we are doing things the right way in different directions. Making sure our children get what we feel is the best and most appropriate education for them and the golf side will happen on its own. I have always said where you choose to settle your family should be determined by two factors above all else: safety and education. If you are going to go private then you don't have to worry so much about the second but some people blow me away who move to areas with low performing schools when economically they could have easily moved to a high performing area.

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D: Ping G30 10 degree, Aldila Reg Flex
3W, and 7W: Cleveland Black, Bassara, Lite Flex
5i - PW: Titleist AP1 716, DG XP90 Reg Flex
W: 48 Cleveland Rotex 3
W: 52 Cleveland Rotex 2
W: 56 Vokey SM6 F Grind
P: TP Mills Flat-T Proto/TP Mills Softtail/Nike Oven MC-07w Prototype
Ball: Srixon Q-Star

Son's Bag (8 years old)
D: Callaway XR16, Flynn Shaft (Set to 15.5)
3W: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 19.5)
4H: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 25)
5i-PW: US Kids Tour Series TS2
W: 52, 56 degree US Kids Tour Series TS2
P: Nike Ignite 006/US Kids Tour Sandhills/Odyssey 2-Ball XJ
Ball: Wilson Duo Soft/Callaway Chrome Soft Truvis

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#16 tiger1873

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 09:50 AM

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

Okay, I'm probably about to piss some people off so let me apologize in advance.

Are you freaking serious talking about HOME SCHOOLING a kid over GOLF? Over any sport? Yes there are some kids that this works for see Pano great kid, great golfer great person and promotes junior golf better than most.  Is having success that important to you that your willing to sacrifice the fact your kid will no longer be a kid? Golf shouldn't be a job at 9.  School is about education and the things they teach today in my option most parents can't understand ie common core math, the things my 1st grader is learning is something I learned when I was in 3rd grade. Are you qualified to give your kid the correct education with out holding them and their future back over a potential golf future which lets be honest is very unlikely.  EDUCATION should come before sports, and school not just about education lets kids be kids, get in trouble now and again be around their peers to let loose. In our area there are a bunch of home schooled kids and my wife is friends with some. I can say their kids are dubber than a box of rocks and have a reading level below kinder because their parents like  'real word education' not to mention they are very socially awkward. Can some home school successfully, yes but why? You say that some things can be taught in a shorter amount of time might be true but school not just books in education there is a huge social element to it. Your will risk the psychological damage to your child with out a doubt.

Who cares if they can drive it 275 at 12 and hit a wedge inside of 3 feet if they are not well rounded human?? Why does a kid let me say that again a KID need to spend 8 hours a day on a golf course each day at 9? Short answer they DON'T. Let kids be kids. If your kid has talent it will shine. So if your kid has to miss a few days of school for golf, I know I have had to do that with mine and she is 7. Not a big deal at least to her school.  I know I'm probably not the norm but my kid only spends a few hours a week practicing her game (probably about 3 or 4), when her peers at least double that. Is she the best in her local tour no, but she wins enough for only being 7 and only looses by a few strokes each time. Meanwhile we get to do her nails with her and play hide in seek while her fat dad gets stuck somewhere. Wouldn't trade that for anything.

My daughter goes to a private school, why I hate public schools and how they teach. They have a golf team starting in 5th grade I think. Not why she goes its about the education she is getting, the environment she is that goes to my core beliefs. Don't make education or social decisions based on sports. You might as well take your paychecks each week and buy them all into the power ball your odds of developing a LPGA/PGA player might be less.

Once again sorry if I'm pissing anyone off....

It's not just about golf, Plenty of public and private schools have issues for that matter.   The better private schools are 20-30k a year. You can get similar education via homeschool via online classes.  Looking over schools it important to weigh your options.  Advanced classes are very competitive to get in good public schools and sometimes they simply will not have enough seats for all the kids and your placed in a lottery to get them.  

It may not be popular to say but doing well in Golf will actually open up doors to colleges as much as higher SAT or Act scores will and good grades so it is relevant.  There are many many kids who never made pro but are making easily 6 figures because they got in to a top school and made good contacts there all because of golf. I know many parents who spend 10-12k a year on tutors so they can learn something in a good public school and the kids are not well rounded either.

The bigger issue is does home schooling cause any long term problems when it comes to NCAA scholarships and from I what can tell the answer is no. This means it is not an option I would take off the table.

Edited by tiger1873, 17 May 2018 - 09:58 AM.


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#17 Baitkiller

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 09:50 AM

Wearing your jersey to school on game day. Priceless.
Getting in your first fist fight. Priceless.
Getting dissed by your friends and left out of something.  Priceless.
Seeing that girl or boy every day and finally working up the currage to speak to them..priceless
Facing that teacher without your assignment finished, getting called out and taken down in front of the whole class and knowing that it was coming all day...priceless.
Being coaxed into trying a new sport and finding out your good at it..  priceless.

A few thoughts. We all could go on and on.

I can Break Rocks
Krank F-5.. UST Tour and or the Cobra F7+ > no winner yet.
Adams Speedline 15* Wasabi stiff
XXIO 5 wood , proprietary shaft
Wilson 2 iron from the 1980s, teaspoon shaft unknown.
Mizuno MP-52 3-PW (48*), DG X100, may soon get recoils.
Mizuno MP R-12 at 54* and 60* DG spinners.
Bettinardi C-01
THE Kirkland Signature 4 piece urethane cover golf ball.

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#18 darter79

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 10:16 AM

View PostBaitkiller, on 17 May 2018 - 09:50 AM, said:

Wearing your jersey to school on game day. Priceless.
Getting in your first fist fight. Priceless.
Getting dissed by your friends and left out of something.  Priceless.
Seeing that girl or boy every day and finally working up the currage to speak to them..priceless
Facing that teacher without your assignment finished, getting called out and taken down in front of the whole class and knowing that it was coming all day...priceless.
Being coaxed into trying a new sport and finding out your good at it..  priceless.

A few thoughts. We all could go on and on.

THIS!!!

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#19 TimberBeast

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 10:23 AM

I would rather my daughter quit playing golf completely than to home school her.  You have to learn life lessons by being in the middle of crazy life sometimes.

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#20 darter79

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 10:23 AM

View Posttiger1873, on 17 May 2018 - 09:50 AM, said:

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 08:34 AM, said:

Okay, I'm probably about to piss some people off so let me apologize in advance.

Are you freaking serious talking about HOME SCHOOLING a kid over GOLF? Over any sport? Yes there are some kids that this works for see Pano great kid, great golfer great person and promotes junior golf better than most.  Is having success that important to you that your willing to sacrifice the fact your kid will no longer be a kid? Golf shouldn't be a job at 9.  School is about education and the things they teach today in my option most parents can't understand ie common core math, the things my 1st grader is learning is something I learned when I was in 3rd grade. Are you qualified to give your kid the correct education with out holding them and their future back over a potential golf future which lets be honest is very unlikely.  EDUCATION should come before sports, and school not just about education lets kids be kids, get in trouble now and again be around their peers to let loose. In our area there are a bunch of home schooled kids and my wife is friends with some. I can say their kids are dubber than a box of rocks and have a reading level below kinder because their parents like  'real word education' not to mention they are very socially awkward. Can some home school successfully, yes but why? You say that some things can be taught in a shorter amount of time might be true but school not just books in education there is a huge social element to it. Your will risk the psychological damage to your child with out a doubt.

Who cares if they can drive it 275 at 12 and hit a wedge inside of 3 feet if they are not well rounded human?? Why does a kid let me say that again a KID need to spend 8 hours a day on a golf course each day at 9? Short answer they DON'T. Let kids be kids. If your kid has talent it will shine. So if your kid has to miss a few days of school for golf, I know I have had to do that with mine and she is 7. Not a big deal at least to her school.  I know I'm probably not the norm but my kid only spends a few hours a week practicing her game (probably about 3 or 4), when her peers at least double that. Is she the best in her local tour no, but she wins enough for only being 7 and only looses by a few strokes each time. Meanwhile we get to do her nails with her and play hide in seek while her fat dad gets stuck somewhere. Wouldn't trade that for anything.

My daughter goes to a private school, why I hate public schools and how they teach. They have a golf team starting in 5th grade I think. Not why she goes its about the education she is getting, the environment she is that goes to my core beliefs. Don't make education or social decisions based on sports. You might as well take your paychecks each week and buy them all into the power ball your odds of developing a LPGA/PGA player might be less.

Once again sorry if I'm pissing anyone off....

It's not just about golf, Plenty of public and private schools have issues for that matter.   The better private schools are 20-30k a year. You can get similar education via homeschool via online classes.  Looking over schools it important to weigh your options.  Advanced classes are very competitive to get in good public schools and sometimes they simply will not have enough seats for all the kids and your placed in a lottery to get them.  

It may not be popular to say but doing well in Golf will actually open up doors to colleges as much as higher SAT or Act scores will and good grades so it is relevant.  There are many many kids who never made pro but are making easily 6 figures because they got in to a top school and made good contacts there all because of golf. I know many parents who spend 10-12k a year on tutors so they can learn something in a good public school and the kids are not well rounded either.

The bigger issue is does home schooling cause any long term problems when it comes to NCAA scholarships and from I what can tell the answer is no. This means it is not an option I would take off the table.

I will strongly disagree you can get similar education from homeschooling than you can public/private, unless you are hiring a full time educator. Taking online classes isn't the same never will be. There are a few teachers I had in HS that truly had a direct impact on my life still today, that you can't find in an online class.  If your kid can't get into more competitive class they should spend more time on education.  Most of those are done by grades than lottery. Being successful at golf has it perks for sure as does anything in life but homeschooling for golf in my opinion is foolish.


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#21 CTgolf

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 10:27 AM

This is not about golf or getting scholarships (although the father I mentioned in my earlier post seems to have professional aspirations for his kids someday).

I stand by my original comment: for parents who are serious about educating and enriching their children, and willing to invest time and resources into helping them maximize their full potential (in anything - not just sports), home-schooling is a superior option and that traditional schooling should mainly be considered as a means of socialization (which, for some, could be the most important thing).

Some of the smartest kids I have come across were home-schooled, as well as some of the best musicians and athletes, particularly in individual sports.

It's simply a function of priorities and scarce resources (mainly time): a motivated kid can achieve far more in a given day learning/training/practicing at her own pace (most go year-round I might add), without all the drama and distractions that school might add.  Oftentimes the brightest students feel that classroom learning is not an efficient use of time (due to teaching to test/exams, least common denominator, behavioral issues, etc).  Our public school system adds extra school days at the end of the academic year during the summer for missed snow days, and every year parents complain that their children come home from those make-up days telling them that they spent the day watching videos or engaging in non-productive (and boring) activities to just pass the time.

Home-schooling allows parents to instill the values that they think are important to the child, while shielding them from others' interests or agenda.  Group extra-curricular activities allow for socializing with other kids, and as there are now almost 2mm children who are home-schooled in the US, there are plenty of opportunities for structured engagements among other like-minded families.

I don't home-school, but I think it is a far superior option for parents who have the time and resources to commit to doing it at a very high level to help a child reach his full potential.

Edited by CTgolf, 17 May 2018 - 10:30 AM.


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#22 Baitkiller

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 10:28 AM

Mr. Wilson world history, softmore, 1978. He used to jump on his desk and throw erasers at me.
Loved that guy!
I can Break Rocks
Krank F-5.. UST Tour and or the Cobra F7+ > no winner yet.
Adams Speedline 15* Wasabi stiff
XXIO 5 wood , proprietary shaft
Wilson 2 iron from the 1980s, teaspoon shaft unknown.
Mizuno MP-52 3-PW (48*), DG X100, may soon get recoils.
Mizuno MP R-12 at 54* and 60* DG spinners.
Bettinardi C-01
THE Kirkland Signature 4 piece urethane cover golf ball.

22

#23 darter79

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 10:47 AM

View PostCTgolf, on 17 May 2018 - 10:27 AM, said:

This is not about golf or getting scholarships (although the father I mentioned in my earlier post seems to have professional aspirations for his kids someday).

I stand by my original comment: for parents who are serious about educating and enriching their children, and willing to invest time and resources into helping them maximize their full potential (in anything - not just sports), home-schooling is a superior option and that traditional schooling should mainly be considered as a means of socialization (which, for some, could be the most important thing).

Some of the smartest kids I have come across were home-schooled, as well as some of the best musicians and athletes, particularly in individual sports.

It's simply a function of priorities and scarce resources (mainly time): a motivated kid can achieve far more in a given day learning/training/practicing at her own pace (most go year-round I might add), without all the drama and distractions that school might add.  Oftentimes the brightest students feel that classroom learning is not an efficient use of time (due to teaching to test/exams, least common denominator, behavioral issues, etc).  Our public school system adds extra school days at the end of the academic year during the summer for missed snow days, and every year parents complain that their children come home from those make-up days telling them that they spent the day watching videos or engaging in non-productive (and boring) activities to just pass the time.

Home-schooling allows parents to instill the values that they think are important to the child, while shielding them from others' interests or agenda.  Group extra-curricular activities allow for socializing with other kids, and as there are now almost 2mm children who are home-schooled in the US, there are plenty of opportunities for structured engagements among other like-minded families.

I don't home-school, but I think it is a far superior option for parents who have the time and resources to commit to doing it at a very high level to help a child reach his full potential.

Coming from the guy who doesn't let his kid ski because of potential..... :taunt:

In no way is homeschooling a superior option and that traditional schooling. Not even close.

23

#24 CTgolf

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 10:54 AM

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 10:47 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 May 2018 - 10:27 AM, said:

This is not about golf or getting scholarships (although the father I mentioned in my earlier post seems to have professional aspirations for his kids someday).

I stand by my original comment: for parents who are serious about educating and enriching their children, and willing to invest time and resources into helping them maximize their full potential (in anything - not just sports), home-schooling is a superior option and that traditional schooling should mainly be considered as a means of socialization (which, for some, could be the most important thing).

Some of the smartest kids I have come across were home-schooled, as well as some of the best musicians and athletes, particularly in individual sports.

It's simply a function of priorities and scarce resources (mainly time): a motivated kid can achieve far more in a given day learning/training/practicing at her own pace (most go year-round I might add), without all the drama and distractions that school might add.  Oftentimes the brightest students feel that classroom learning is not an efficient use of time (due to teaching to test/exams, least common denominator, behavioral issues, etc).  Our public school system adds extra school days at the end of the academic year during the summer for missed snow days, and every year parents complain that their children come home from those make-up days telling them that they spent the day watching videos or engaging in non-productive (and boring) activities to just pass the time.

Home-schooling allows parents to instill the values that they think are important to the child, while shielding them from others' interests or agenda.  Group extra-curricular activities allow for socializing with other kids, and as there are now almost 2mm children who are home-schooled in the US, there are plenty of opportunities for structured engagements among other like-minded families.

I don't home-school, but I think it is a far superior option for parents who have the time and resources to commit to doing it at a very high level to help a child reach his full potential.

Coming from the guy who doesn't let his kid ski because of potential..... :taunt:

In no way is homeschooling a superior option and that traditional schooling. Not even close.

It sounds like you don't know any outstanding kids who were home-schooled

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#25 darter79

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:00 AM

View PostCTgolf, on 17 May 2018 - 10:54 AM, said:

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 10:47 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 May 2018 - 10:27 AM, said:

This is not about golf or getting scholarships (although the father I mentioned in my earlier post seems to have professional aspirations for his kids someday).

I stand by my original comment: for parents who are serious about educating and enriching their children, and willing to invest time and resources into helping them maximize their full potential (in anything - not just sports), home-schooling is a superior option and that traditional schooling should mainly be considered as a means of socialization (which, for some, could be the most important thing).

Some of the smartest kids I have come across were home-schooled, as well as some of the best musicians and athletes, particularly in individual sports.

It's simply a function of priorities and scarce resources (mainly time): a motivated kid can achieve far more in a given day learning/training/practicing at her own pace (most go year-round I might add), without all the drama and distractions that school might add.  Oftentimes the brightest students feel that classroom learning is not an efficient use of time (due to teaching to test/exams, least common denominator, behavioral issues, etc).  Our public school system adds extra school days at the end of the academic year during the summer for missed snow days, and every year parents complain that their children come home from those make-up days telling them that they spent the day watching videos or engaging in non-productive (and boring) activities to just pass the time.

Home-schooling allows parents to instill the values that they think are important to the child, while shielding them from others' interests or agenda.  Group extra-curricular activities allow for socializing with other kids, and as there are now almost 2mm children who are home-schooled in the US, there are plenty of opportunities for structured engagements among other like-minded families.

I don't home-school, but I think it is a far superior option for parents who have the time and resources to commit to doing it at a very high level to help a child reach his full potential.

Coming from the guy who doesn't let his kid ski because of potential..... :taunt:

In no way is homeschooling a superior option and that traditional schooling. Not even close.

It sounds like you don't know any outstanding kids who were home-schooled

I’ve known a few but only that.  For every outstanding kid there are more that are below average.  If homeschooling is such a superior resource you’d see it more than 3% of the time.


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#26 BloctonGolf11

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:03 AM

CTGolf you say home school is a FAR superior option....

Show me one home school situation where they are instructed by someone who spent years honing their craft in the specific disciplines of social studies, English language arts, sciences, math, music, theater, foreign languages, or any of the other subjects they have the opportunity to take in a high performing well run middle and high school. In a home school situation they have to be experts at ALL of them. No one can do that. Show me a home school situation where they access to lab equipment, musical instruments, a full gymnasium, and the social aspects and leadership opportunities of a high performing public or private high school. Most importantly show me one successful human being who does not list a TEACHER as one of the major influences. As well, you know what school teaches you to do:  succeed and to prosper or flounder and fail without mommy and daddy right on your shoulder. School is the preparation for the real world and it goes FAR beyond the simple curriculum and text books. Can a home school student be successful with the right situation? Of course they can! However, to say it is a FAR SUPERIOR situation is just grandstanding and hyperbole.
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D: Ping G30 10 degree, Aldila Reg Flex
3W, and 7W: Cleveland Black, Bassara, Lite Flex
5i - PW: Titleist AP1 716, DG XP90 Reg Flex
W: 48 Cleveland Rotex 3
W: 52 Cleveland Rotex 2
W: 56 Vokey SM6 F Grind
P: TP Mills Flat-T Proto/TP Mills Softtail/Nike Oven MC-07w Prototype
Ball: Srixon Q-Star

Son's Bag (8 years old)
D: Callaway XR16, Flynn Shaft (Set to 15.5)
3W: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 19.5)
4H: Cobra Biocell, Flynn Shaft (Set to 25)
5i-PW: US Kids Tour Series TS2
W: 52, 56 degree US Kids Tour Series TS2
P: Nike Ignite 006/US Kids Tour Sandhills/Odyssey 2-Ball XJ
Ball: Wilson Duo Soft/Callaway Chrome Soft Truvis

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#27 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:24 AM

Dadgum...  

I agree with Darter, Golfdawg, and Blocton.  I am a former educator (BS in physical education with minor in secondary math education) while my wife teaches secondary math (Algebra II to Calculus).  I don't see how an online class or parent can teach higher mathematics.  Going to college and majoring in something you can find a job at in this day and age requires a mathematics background.  Unless you can find a home school consortium in your area home schoolers really lack what you need to move on and be successful.

With that said, public schooling has become horrible over the past 10 years.  Too much riff raff in our public high schools and kids in higher level classes that shouldn't be there, so the classes get dumbed down.  We are currently looking for other options right now for high school.  Our son attended the best elementary and middle schools in the county academically which both happen to be public schools.  Pretty sure my son will be going to a charter high school.  They actually have a golf program in the school where they learn management, agriculture, and get to practice from 1-4 every day M-F and get college credit for doing it.  Fridays they get out of class at 11 and are at the golf course.  There is a community college right across the street will he will take most of his classes because of his high academics.  If we decide to send him there he will graduate with his AA degree and have two years of college done and paid for regardless of whether he plays golf in college.  They do not have athletic teams at this charter so he will still be able to play sports at the public high school he is supposed to attend.  Gets the best of both worlds for academics/athletics and won't cost me a dime.

I understand where Tiger is coming from because there are really bad public schools in his area in Florida.  They are really hit and miss in that county.  I don't think, however, home schooling to play a sport is the answer.  A kid is going to make it regardless of how much practice they have.  As Gofdawg mentioned, my daughter didn't even start playing tournament golf until after the first semester of her 8th grade year.  She ended up earning a D1 scholarship.

If I were Tiger, I would explore the Charter school options.

https://www.palmbeac...arterdirectory/

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#28 CTgolf

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:46 AM

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 11:00 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 May 2018 - 10:54 AM, said:

View Postdarter79, on 17 May 2018 - 10:47 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 May 2018 - 10:27 AM, said:

This is not about golf or getting scholarships (although the father I mentioned in my earlier post seems to have professional aspirations for his kids someday).

I stand by my original comment: for parents who are serious about educating and enriching their children, and willing to invest time and resources into helping them maximize their full potential (in anything - not just sports), home-schooling is a superior option and that traditional schooling should mainly be considered as a means of socialization (which, for some, could be the most important thing).

Some of the smartest kids I have come across were home-schooled, as well as some of the best musicians and athletes, particularly in individual sports.

It's simply a function of priorities and scarce resources (mainly time): a motivated kid can achieve far more in a given day learning/training/practicing at her own pace (most go year-round I might add), without all the drama and distractions that school might add.  Oftentimes the brightest students feel that classroom learning is not an efficient use of time (due to teaching to test/exams, least common denominator, behavioral issues, etc).  Our public school system adds extra school days at the end of the academic year during the summer for missed snow days, and every year parents complain that their children come home from those make-up days telling them that they spent the day watching videos or engaging in non-productive (and boring) activities to just pass the time.

Home-schooling allows parents to instill the values that they think are important to the child, while shielding them from others' interests or agenda.  Group extra-curricular activities allow for socializing with other kids, and as there are now almost 2mm children who are home-schooled in the US, there are plenty of opportunities for structured engagements among other like-minded families.

I don't home-school, but I think it is a far superior option for parents who have the time and resources to commit to doing it at a very high level to help a child reach his full potential.

Coming from the guy who doesn't let his kid ski because of potential..... :taunt:

In no way is homeschooling a superior option and that traditional schooling. Not even close.

It sounds like you don't know any outstanding kids who were home-schooled

I’ve known a few but only that.  For every outstanding kid there are more that are below average.  If homeschooling is such a superior resource you’d see it more than 3% of the time.

By definition, someone who is outstanding is exceptional.  So your comment that "for every outstanding kid there are more that are below average" is stating the obvious and not particularly helpful to the discussion.

Since the OP is trying to understand whether home-schooling would be detrimental to being able to play golf at the next level (presumably using it for skill-building i.e. helping maximize kids' potential in an extra-curricular activity as opposed to using it as a means to instill religious values or for other legitimate, but irrelevant to this discussion, reasons), I think we should put aside the masses who may use home-schooling for purposes other than to help a child focus on developing a specific talent.  I think if you narrowed it down to those who are using home-schooling for that specific purpose, you would find that the results are compelling.

Furthermore, in my opinion only 3% home-school because 1) most families don't think it's effective (are the masses right?), 2) they aren't willing (or able) to put forth the effort and spend the time/resources/energy to doing it properly, 3) paying someone else to do it (either via taxes or additional tuition) is far easier, and 4) some probably don't really care all that much about their children's development.

The parents I know who who treated it like a full-time job with the intention of having their kids focus on developing a specific talent ended up with well-adjusted children who achieved outstanding results, including some of the best in the country/world at what they wanted to do.

Edited by CTgolf, 17 May 2018 - 12:06 PM.


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#29 CTgolf

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:49 AM

View PostBloctonGolf11, on 17 May 2018 - 11:03 AM, said:

CTGolf you say home school is a FAR superior option....

Show me one home school situation where they are instructed by someone who spent years honing their craft in the specific disciplines of social studies, English language arts, sciences, math, music, theater, foreign languages, or any of the other subjects they have the opportunity to take in a high performing well run middle and high school. In a home school situation they have to be experts at ALL of them. No one can do that. Show me a home school situation where they access to lab equipment, musical instruments, a full gymnasium, and the social aspects and leadership opportunities of a high performing public or private high school. Most importantly show me one successful human being who does not list a TEACHER as one of the major influences. As well, you know what school teaches you to do:  succeed and to prosper or flounder and fail without mommy and daddy right on your shoulder. School is the preparation for the real world and it goes FAR beyond the simple curriculum and text books. Can a home school student be successful with the right situation? Of course they can! However, to say it is a FAR SUPERIOR situation is just grandstanding and hyperbole.

I should probably qualify my answers (as I did in response to darter79) and use less flowery language

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#30 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 May 2018 - 11:50 AM

To answer the original question:

Colleges don't care if your kid is home schooled.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 17 May 2018 - 11:56 AM.


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