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What will be your choice


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#1 wkuo3

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 07:49 AM

So, up until several years ago, my golf game had always been the inward 9 was better than the outward 9, lack of the proper warming up ?   Don't have a lot of time to let the body warm up and the golf swing to find it's way for the day ?

In recent years, the score for the front and the back nines were first, getting similar, then the back nine seemed to starting to get worse then the front nine.  My body was not able to walk the hilly 18 and still perform as usual.  

My question to you would be, if that's your case, would you give up walking the golf course and ride the buggy to get a better score or, continue to walk the golf course like you always enjoyed doing so and ignore the numbers on the score card ?

Of course, there would be methods to delay the decision making, but I don't have the time to work out an hour or more a day at this point ( plus a lot of protein supplement.   Second thing will be financial.  Around here the extra fee for the golf cart is about 2 lb. of USDA Prime Rib Eye.  I don't know why I think of it that way, the picture of two pounds of beautiful Rib Eye jumped in my mind when I figured out the cart fees.  Or 5 lb. of organic ground beef if one want to calculate that way.......or 30 lb. of California CalRose premium sushi rice........

Green fees and cart fee are going up faster than anything else.... well, except for the recent price jump at the gas pump.  Averaging over $3.20 for the regular unleaded.


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#2 Davewn

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 08:51 AM

Maybe you can have your ribeye and eat it too- you could walk the front nine and rent a cart for the back nine (assuming of course, the ninth hole finishes close to the pro shop).
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#3 wrmiller

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 10:38 AM

Before the last layoff from golf, I noticed that I was getting more tired and/or having more back/hip issues on the back nine and my score reflected that. But I was playing in the Boulder, CO area and the air was a bit thin and some of those courses were very hilly.

I'm not back to sea level, but I did drop a couple thousand feet and my new course is pretty flat compared to what I was playing. So I'm hoping that the more I play in my comeback tour that I will eventually be able to walk again. I am slowly getting rid of some extra weight that I put on in the last couple of years of not playing, and I am hoping that this will reduce some of the strain on my hips/knees.

We'll see. Fingers crossed. :)

Oh, and to answer your question OP, I'd rather walk even if it hurts a bit, because I know there will come a day when I can no longer walk the course. And, as I can no longer input a score for handicap when playing alone (which I do most of the time) the score really doesn't matter to me anymore.
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#4 wkuo3

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 12:18 PM

View PostDavewn, on 04 May 2018 - 08:51 AM, said:

Maybe you can have your ribeye and eat it too- you could walk the front nine and rent a cart for the back nine (assuming of course, the ninth hole finishes close to the pro shop).

Comparing cart fee to food price is just , a comparison, as the price hike will force people in general to pay attention to what they'll be doing and adjust their habit for value.
My wife asked me why I couldn't get on the neighborhood trail ( more than 5 miles meandering through the development + real hiking trail , more than a dozen trail heads around a 5 miles radius ) and it's free...... I answered, I couldn't hit a golf ball through the neighborhood.
The sports is trending back, someone best pay attention to the needs of the majority golfers, whom are either already retired, or on their way to be retired and on fixed income.  The golf courses could not survive on weekend warriors alone.

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#5 rwc356

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 12:25 PM

As arthritis became a more constant golf partner, I considered the fear of moving to an electric cart and never being able to walk again. As a compromise I purchased a nice push cart which included a seat. While its great, I found I really hated pushing the darn thing. So next idea was to reduce the number of clubs I carried, based on the Minimalist concept. By cutting back my clubs to 8 or 9, I found I could walk fine for 9 holes and could handle the pain on the back 9 if the course was pretty flat. Otherwise it was either the push cart or the electric buggy. Sadly age is one tough cookie to beat some times.

Just an older guy with 7 or 8 clubs and a MacKenzie Walker bag

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#6 wkuo3

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 12:31 PM

View Postwrmiller, on 04 May 2018 - 10:38 AM, said:

Before the last layoff from golf, I noticed that I was getting more tired and/or having more back/hip issues on the back nine and my score reflected that. But I was playing in the Boulder, CO area and the air was a bit thin and some of those courses were very hilly.

I'm not back to sea level, but I did drop a couple thousand feet and my new course is pretty flat compared to what I was playing. So I'm hoping that the more I play in my comeback tour that I will eventually be able to walk again. I am slowly getting rid of some extra weight that I put on in the last couple of years of not playing, and I am hoping that this will reduce some of the strain on my hips/knees.

We'll see. Fingers crossed. :)

Oh, and to answer your question OP, I'd rather walk even if it hurts a bit, because I know there will come a day when I can no longer walk the course. And, as I can no longer input a score for handicap when playing alone (which I do most of the time) the score really doesn't matter to me anymore.

I wish you the best on your way to recovering.  I could certainly understand the correlation between walking a golf course and my body weight ( especially the legs and the mid section ).
Totally agree with walking the golf course before my time to have to take a golf cart .

In regards to walking, a side story of one of my client.  He works in the high tech industry since he got out of school.  Had been playing golf since he was in his mid 30's and always walked.  But in other parts of his life he almost always drive a vehicle to get him around town, even if it's only a couple of miles away.  The usual habit we have in this Nation.

He lost his position after he got over 50, when the self paid health insurance of the company decided he was in the high risk group.
He had to find the next best position to support his family so the next best thing is to work overseas instead of becoming a contractor to the same industry which laid him off.  After several years overseas he finally found another position local and came home.  He must have lost at least 20-25% of his body weight comparing to the time I last saw him.  All because he said while overseas people walked everywhere and combined public transportation with walking to get around.  It's no surprise if he walked more than 10 KM per day.  Now he's back and not back to playing golf just yet.  I hope he will not gain all the weight back that he had lost.
For me, although the last few rounds of walking the 18 had been punishing, played on the golf course with elevation changes, I think I will stick it up and try to walk every round of golf.  Although, I might hint to my wife what I want for the next Christmas - a self propelled golf push cart which will follow me like a puppy on the golf course.

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#7 wkuo3

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 12:44 PM

View Postrwc356, on 04 May 2018 - 12:25 PM, said:

As arthritis became a more constant golf partner, I considered the fear of moving to an electric cart and never being able to walk again. As a compromise I purchased a nice push cart which included a seat. While its great, I found I really hated pushing the darn thing. So next idea was to reduce the number of clubs I carried, based on the Minimalist concept. By cutting back my clubs to 8 or 9, I found I could walk fine for 9 holes and could handle the pain on the back 9 if the course was pretty flat. Otherwise it was either the push cart or the electric buggy. Sadly age is one tough cookie to beat some times.

Yes, that'll be my next step, a lighter bag with 7-8 golf clubs.  Not that I haven't dine it before but back in the years that idea was for training to learn to get around the golf course with less number of golf clubs, for the sake of learning to improvise and manufacturing different golf shots.This is something I'd like to have before I give in to riding golf cart.
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#8 wrmiller

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 05:33 PM

View Postwkuo3, on 04 May 2018 - 12:31 PM, said:

View Postwrmiller, on 04 May 2018 - 10:38 AM, said:

Before the last layoff from golf, I noticed that I was getting more tired and/or having more back/hip issues on the back nine and my score reflected that. But I was playing in the Boulder, CO area and the air was a bit thin and some of those courses were very hilly.

I'm not back to sea level, but I did drop a couple thousand feet and my new course is pretty flat compared to what I was playing. So I'm hoping that the more I play in my comeback tour that I will eventually be able to walk again. I am slowly getting rid of some extra weight that I put on in the last couple of years of not playing, and I am hoping that this will reduce some of the strain on my hips/knees.

We'll see. Fingers crossed. :)

Oh, and to answer your question OP, I'd rather walk even if it hurts a bit, because I know there will come a day when I can no longer walk the course. And, as I can no longer input a score for handicap when playing alone (which I do most of the time) the score really doesn't matter to me anymore.

I wish you the best on your way to recovering.  I could certainly understand the correlation between walking a golf course and my body weight ( especially the legs and the mid section ).
Totally agree with walking the golf course before my time to have to take a golf cart .

In regards to walking, a side story of one of my client.  He works in the high tech industry since he got out of school.  Had been playing golf since he was in his mid 30's and always walked.  But in other parts of his life he almost always drive a vehicle to get him around town, even if it's only a couple of miles away.  The usual habit we have in this Nation.

He lost his position after he got over 50, when the self paid health insurance of the company decided he was in the high risk group.
He had to find the next best position to support his family so the next best thing is to work overseas instead of becoming a contractor to the same industry which laid him off.  After several years overseas he finally found another position local and came home.  He must have lost at least 20-25% of his body weight comparing to the time I last saw him.  All because he said while overseas people walked everywhere and combined public transportation with walking to get around.  It's no surprise if he walked more than 10 KM per day.  Now he's back and not back to playing golf just yet.  I hope he will not gain all the weight back that he had lost.
For me, although the last few rounds of walking the 18 had been punishing, played on the golf course with elevation changes, I think I will stick it up and try to walk every round of golf.  Although, I might hint to my wife what I want for the next Christmas - a self propelled golf push cart which will follow me like a puppy on the golf course.

If I can get to where I can walk the course again, I will be getting one of those battery powered push carts. Lots of the guys (and girls) have them at my local club.
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Titleist 913h 17
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Scratch wedges 50, 55, and 60
Bettinardi mid-shank putter

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Ping G400 9
Ping G30 fw 13
Ping G30 hybrid 19
Ping iBlade 4-PW power spec
Macgregor VIP wedges 51, 56, and 60
Bettinardi mid-shank putter

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#9 oldschoolrocker

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Posted 04 May 2018 - 05:44 PM

Love the 🥩 analogy.  I had been a walker most of my golfing life, then after my surgery I found it too much of a strain to walk a full eighteen.  Usually start fading fast about the 13th, or, 14th hole, making the home stretch at best a labor of love, and worsts case agonizing.
Only walk now if I know only nine is in the forecast.  I walk at least 5 miles daily and work out 3 to 4 times a week, but, itís a no go for eighteen whether I carry, or, use a push cart.
Looking into an electric trolley.

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#10 Chris122

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 02:36 AM

I think that there are a number of variables that come into play as age increases,my rheumatoid arthritis is generally controlled by medication but I still have days when I feel lethargic and lack energy and will struggle on the course,I find that concentration is the problem,the usual routine is to start well feeling fresh,mentally alert and focussed,able to 'see' the shot,then mid-round which coincides with the most difficult holes on the course I tend to fade then recover for the closing four or five holes.
The course is at its steepest and most undulating over 7,8 and 9,I bought a trolley to take the weight off my back and knees but rarely use it now and have gone ultra-light in a pencil bag,I played the other day with driver,5,7,9,putter and played pretty well but still had the mid-round 'wobble'.
Hydration and nutrition are also serious issues,next week I'm force-feeding myself with energy bars and glucose drink on the 5th prior to tackling the mile of misery.
Buggy-no.
Trolley-odd occasions.
Pencil bag and walking for choice.


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#11 elwhippy

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 06:16 AM

Golf is exercise. I avoid buggies unless we are on a modern venue where the walks between tees are insane. However, if I lived in the US or some other country with baking hot summers and a high risk of getting sunburn I would use a buggy every time.

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#12 Chris122

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 09:53 AM

That's a good point about green to tee yardages and how modern courses frequently have major hikes to the next tee whereas old courses have a flow to them unless spoiled by lunatic chairmen of greens building their own monuments.

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#13 wkuo3

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Posted 05 May 2018 - 10:01 AM

View PostChris122, on 05 May 2018 - 02:36 AM, said:

I think that there are a number of variables that come into play as age increases,my rheumatoid arthritis is generally controlled by medication but I still have days when I feel lethargic and lack energy and will struggle on the course,I find that concentration is the problem,the usual routine is to start well feeling fresh,mentally alert and focussed,able to 'see' the shot,then mid-round which coincides with the most difficult holes on the course I tend to fade then recover for the closing four or five holes.
The course is at its steepest and most undulating over 7,8 and 9,I bought a trolley to take the weight off my back and knees but rarely use it now and have gone ultra-light in a pencil bag,I played the other day with driver,5,7,9,putter and played pretty well but still had the mid-round 'wobble'.
Hydration and nutrition are also serious issues,next week I'm force-feeding myself with energy bars and glucose drink on the 5th prior to tackling the mile of misery.
Buggy-no.
Trolley-odd occasions.
Pencil bag and walking for choice.

R.A. is no joke, a debilitating decease which will eat into your well-being a piece at a time.  Proper diet is the long term solution to help delay the process but, not many could be disciplined to follow the diet.
I have a friend whom has the R.A. and it's been eating into his shoulders and knees.  He refused to get on the proper diet, his reason being who cares in 10 years.......in the meantime, his golf game just went down hill each month.
Medication will ease the daily pain, but may damage other parts of your body for prolonged ingestion.

We have some golf courses around here which are not walker friendly, elevation changes and the distance between the green to the next tee is a hike.  I refused to play one of the local trek, because from one green to the next tee box is a 150' hike in elevation.  another trek has several green to tee layout as 7-8 minutes up hill climb.

Played the last round with a 26 year old ( used to be on High School Golf Team ), This kid could reach most the par 5 in two with 6-4 iron used as the approach shot.  we had to climb up one tee box to the back tee straight up 120'.  Even he was winded walking up and then promptly put two tee shots into the left woods.
Good thing about being young is they recovered really fast.

Edited by wkuo3, 05 May 2018 - 10:18 AM.


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