Jump to content

Welcome. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with members, access to all forums and eligiblility to win free giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

Article: How good are the best college golfers, exactly?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 CTgolf

CTgolf

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 124521
  • Joined: 03/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 238

Posted 04 March 2018 - 05:45 PM

http://www.golfwrx.c...ated-handicaps/

"Investing in breaking par is an important skill for junior golfers since men’s college coaches certainly seek players who have experience breaking par in tournaments. Also, it is likely that tournament golf will be 1-4 shots harder than playing your home golf course. If earning a college scholarship requires a scoring average of 75 or better, this means that the player might need to average as little as 71 on their home golf course!"

Seems kind of a low bar, but the overall spirit of the article makes sense to me


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


1

#2 iteachgolf

iteachgolf

    Legend

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,273 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 14489
  • Joined: 04/30/2006
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL
GolfWRX Likes : 7450

Posted 04 March 2018 - 08:51 PM

What do you think the bar should be?  A scoring average of 75 in high level junior golf would put you ranked around 1,000 in JGS.   Those numbers would make you around a +3 handicap if your home course is rated similar to most junior golf events.

Thereís 301 D1 menís programs and 225 D2 menís programs.  Thatís 2,164.5 scholarships available in menís golf. And doesnít include NAIA golf.

2

#3 CTgolf

CTgolf

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 124521
  • Joined: 03/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 238

Posted 05 March 2018 - 10:15 AM

View Postiteachgolf, on 04 March 2018 - 08:51 PM, said:

What do you think the bar should be?  A scoring average of 75 in high level junior golf would put you ranked around 1,000 in JGS.   Those numbers would make you around a +3 handicap if your home course is rated similar to most junior golf events.

There's 301 D1 men's programs and 225 D2 men's programs.  That's 2,164.5 scholarships available in men's golf. And doesn't include NAIA golf.

That scholarship total is for the entire team?  So basically 25% of that total for each year (or roughly 540)?

JGS rankings for class of 2018 show scoring differential of +3 over par around #800.

I would guess the vast majority of home courses junior golfers play at are nowhere near the difficulty of championship venues.  And even if they were, comparing your home course (which you know like the back of your hand and have played hundreds or thousands of times) vs an unfamiliar track in tournament conditions (with the requisite pressure) seems to me like 1-4 strokes is too little a differential.

3

#4 iteachgolf

iteachgolf

    Legend

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,273 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 14489
  • Joined: 04/30/2006
  • Location:Jacksonville, FL
GolfWRX Likes : 7450

Posted 05 March 2018 - 10:32 AM

View PostCTgolf, on 05 March 2018 - 10:15 AM, said:

View Postiteachgolf, on 04 March 2018 - 08:51 PM, said:

What do you think the bar should be?  A scoring average of 75 in high level junior golf would put you ranked around 1,000 in JGS.   Those numbers would make you around a +3 handicap if your home course is rated similar to most junior golf events.

There's 301 D1 men's programs and 225 D2 men's programs.  That's 2,164.5 scholarships available in men's golf. And doesn't include NAIA golf.

That scholarship total is for the entire team?  So basically 25% of that total for each year (or roughly 540)?

JGS rankings for class of 2018 show scoring differential of +3 over par around #800.

I would guess the vast majority of home courses junior golfers play at are nowhere near the difficulty of championship venues.  And even if they were, comparing your home course (which you know like the back of your hand and have played hundreds or thousands of times) vs an unfamiliar track in tournament conditions (with the requisite pressure) seems to me like 1-4 strokes is too little a differential.

Couple things: a 75 scoring average wonít have a +3 differential on JGS.  The scoring differential is based on the rating of the golf course which averages around 73.5 in most decently ranked junior events. That means a scoring average of 75 will give you a differential of about 1.5.  Not 3

I donít know where you play or what you consider ďchampionship venuesĒ.   The junior events here, and Iím taking AJGA and FJT, are all at the same courses these kids play all the time.  Difficulty level is about the same or harder on their home courses vs tournament venues.  If you shoot more than 4 shots worse per round in tournaments than tournament golf likely isnít for you.   Every kid thatís the least bit serious is playing practice rounds, so the courses arenít unfamiliar.

Thatís 540 FULL scholarships.  Very few full rides are given. A ton of 25-50% scholarships are given which means itís more like 1,000-2,000 scholarships a year.  And again thatís NOT including NAIA golf which allows an addition 4.5 scholarships per team.  A player ranked 800 in JGS will absolutely 100% have scholarship offers in golf.  Anyone top 1,200 will have scholarship offers available, just maybe not to the school of their choice.

4

#5 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,703 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 2313

Posted 05 March 2018 - 10:49 AM

My son actually gets bored playing at his home course.  It is a practice facility only for him.  Nice track, it just gets boring playing the same course every single day.  You start taking it for granted and get careless.  My kid plays his best golf at other courses because they are more exciting and something new.  His best scores are at other courses and not our home course.

A men's golfer in the top 100 in the country may get a full ride his first year to get them on campus.  After that it is highly unlikely they get a full ride over the remaining years they are there.  They reduce the scholarship limit the next year to have money for new freshman the following year.  College coaches love kids with great academics so that they can get them academic money without giving up part of their 4.5 scholarships a year.  They also love kids from other countries because government programs in other countries will set up scholarship programs for athletes and high academics to go to the states and play.  Again, this doesn't dive into the 4.5 scholarships.


5

#6 CTgolf

CTgolf

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 124521
  • Joined: 03/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 238

Posted 06 March 2018 - 02:30 PM

Moving along...

I thought this bit from the last paragraph was interesting and enlightening:

"Please also remember that whenever possible, players should be playing at least 18 holes per day. Elite golf is about continuous steady play. Shooting outstanding scores over 54 holes requires not only great technical skill but also endurance, hydration, nutrition, focus, stress management and the ability to make birdies. In the summer, when juniors don’t have any academic responsibilities, it would not be impossible to play 36 holes or more of golf per day."

6

#7 CTgolf

CTgolf

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 346 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 124521
  • Joined: 03/14/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 238

Posted 06 March 2018 - 02:44 PM

View Postiteachgolf, on 05 March 2018 - 10:32 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 05 March 2018 - 10:15 AM, said:

View Postiteachgolf, on 04 March 2018 - 08:51 PM, said:

What do you think the bar should be?  A scoring average of 75 in high level junior golf would put you ranked around 1,000 in JGS.   Those numbers would make you around a +3 handicap if your home course is rated similar to most junior golf events.

There's 301 D1 men's programs and 225 D2 men's programs.  That's 2,164.5 scholarships available in men's golf. And doesn't include NAIA golf.

That scholarship total is for the entire team?  So basically 25% of that total for each year (or roughly 540)?

JGS rankings for class of 2018 show scoring differential of +3 over par around #800.

I would guess the vast majority of home courses junior golfers play at are nowhere near the difficulty of championship venues.  And even if they were, comparing your home course (which you know like the back of your hand and have played hundreds or thousands of times) vs an unfamiliar track in tournament conditions (with the requisite pressure) seems to me like 1-4 strokes is too little a differential.

Couple things: a 75 scoring average won't have a +3 differential on JGS.  The scoring differential is based on the rating of the golf course which averages around 73.5 in most decently ranked junior events. That means a scoring average of 75 will give you a differential of about 1.5.  Not 3

I don't know where you play or what you consider "championship venues".   The junior events here, and I'm taking AJGA and FJT, are all at the same courses these kids play all the time.  Difficulty level is about the same or harder on their home courses vs tournament venues.  If you shoot more than 4 shots worse per round in tournaments than tournament golf likely isn't for you.   Every kid that's the least bit serious is playing practice rounds, so the courses aren't unfamiliar.

That's 540 FULL scholarships.  Very few full rides are given. A ton of 25-50% scholarships are given which means it's more like 1,000-2,000 scholarships a year.  And again that's NOT including NAIA golf which allows an addition 4.5 scholarships per team.  A player ranked 800 in JGS will absolutely 100% have scholarship offers in golf.  Anyone top 1,200 will have scholarship offers available, just maybe not to the school of their choice.

Ah the differential being vs Course Rating and not par makes sense - thanks for the explanation

I only know of a handful of AJGA tournaments in the general area where we live, and the ratings/slopes are significantly higher than the avg public course or private/country club track; but again a small sample size

The more I think about it, the difficulty may not be so much in playing college golf in general (and even getting some type of athletic scholarship - which seem to be in abundance based on the stats you posted) as it is in wanting to play for a specific school/program, which, unless the junior is one of the most sought-after in his class, can come down to a bunch of different factors outside of a player's (and even coach's) control

7

#8 Nevergolfpar

Nevergolfpar

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 54 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 393204
  • Joined: 08/26/2015
  • Location:Florida
  • Handicap:14
GolfWRX Likes : 74

Posted 08 March 2018 - 12:27 AM

Regarding the question asked in the title of this thread, I can share a bit of insight.  My son, a scholarship player on a mid major D1 program is ranked around 350 in the two college ranking sites.  His average collegiate score is 72.1.   He typically shoots scores from a low of 67 to a high of 77.

His WAGR ranking is a bit better as it includes both his college and his amateur events where he tends to score better.  In amateur tournaments (State & National ranked events only) which tend to play a bit easier, his scoring range drops from a low of  63 (twice) to a high of 75.

Overall, his USGA tournament handicap is +5.1.  

Now my son is not considered to be one of the 'best college golfers', but is considered to be one of the 'better college golfers'.  With that said, how good are the best players?  I would estimate, those players residing in the top 10 of the college rankings would play to a tournament handicap of +7.0.  

The next question is how good does a tournament handicap translate to the game that most of us play?  Again, using my son as an example.  Over this past winter he played 19 'casual' rounds at courses near my house in South Florida.  Of those rounds all of them were under par except one in which he shot even (all strange courses for him, as I recently moved here).  His average score 68.1.  Had I inputted his handicap over these rounds his handicap would shoot down to a +8.2!  The best estimate I can come up with is to add one stroke ones tournament handicap, and that will result in one's average score over a typical 'casual' round.  

Given my estimate of the best college golfers having a tournament handicap of +7.0, you could add 1 stoke, and that player would average 6 under par during a typical casual round with friends.  

I would also estimate that the average PGA tour player making cuts, is playing to a handicap of +8.0.  Only 1 stroke better than the best college players.  However, given the more consistent scoring conditions found on the PGA tour (uniform bunkers, consistent speed on greens, forecaddies to help find balls etc...), I would surmise that the Average PGA tour player is slightly better (if better at all) than the top college players.  

That's the best I can come up with, to estimate how good the best college players are.

8

#9 hrmgolf72

hrmgolf72

    hrmgolf

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 81 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 491714
  • Joined: 01/23/2018
  • Location:atlanta
  • Handicap:+1
GolfWRX Likes : 14

Posted 12 March 2018 - 08:52 PM

the pros may not be much better than the above average college golfer, they are a little bit better. But pros are smarter, make fewer mistakes, handle pressure.

in response to above post

Edited by hrmgolf72, 12 March 2018 - 08:53 PM.


9



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

GolfWRX Sponsors