Jump to content

Welcome. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with members, access to all forums and eligiblility to win free giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

What to Watch out for in College Program


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 359 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 134

Posted 25 January 2018 - 11:15 AM

I am looking around the internet and I don't see anything about this.  I know you have to start early on getting together a list of colleges and be proactive if your kids want to get a good scholarship.

Looking over college programs I have notice many places are not created equal.  So what is some things we need to watch out for? Obviously a bad cultural fit is big no no.  I would think a program where the kids are not graduating or encouraged to take "easy classes" is just as bad.

Edited by tiger1873, 25 January 2018 - 11:16 AM.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


1

#2 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,970 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 1390

Posted 25 January 2018 - 01:13 PM

Not sure if I really understand the question.  There are resources at Junior Golf Scoreboard and AJGA that you can use.  AJGA it comes with the membership.  JGS is free I believe.  There definitely isn't a manual on how to get a scholarship.

This is golf, not Football or Basketball.  Football, Basketball, and other head count sports can get kids through at many institutions that wouldn't normally meet their academic requirements.  You can't do this for golf and other equivalency sports.  Not only do you have to meet the NCAA clearinghouse requirements, you have to meet the universities academic standards.  

All athletes have an academic adviser.  There are several academic advisers on campus that only handle athletes.  They talk to the athlete and get to know them.  The academic adviser makes your schedule for you according to your major.  Athletes are the first students to have class schedules as the advisers schedule the classes around your athletic schedule.  My daughters golf team does not have class on Fridays.  

When you go to schools on official visits you meet the other players.  You will know real quick if you fit in or not.  The kids and parents also talk.  We found a couple of coaches that told us one thing and another recruit something the totally opposite on just general questions.  One of the schools the coach was fired within several months of our visit and we knew why.

When the student is in the 8th grade they need to start emailing and calling coaches.  My 7th grader will start doing these things this summer.  His schedule next year as an 8th grader will be near universities that he is interested in attending.  He will email and call the coaches and let them know that he will be in the area playing.

If you or anyone have a question about it, don't hesitate to pm me.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 25 January 2018 - 02:14 PM.


2

#3 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 359 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 134

Posted 25 January 2018 - 04:04 PM

 heavy_hitter, on 25 January 2018 - 01:13 PM, said:

Not sure if I really understand the question.  There are resources at Junior Golf Scoreboard and AJGA that you can use.  AJGA it comes with the membership.  JGS is free I believe.  There definitely isn't a manual on how to get a scholarship.

This is golf, not Football or Basketball.  Football, Basketball, and other head count sports can get kids through at many institutions that wouldn't normally meet their academic requirements.  You can't do this for golf and other equivalency sports.  Not only do you have to meet the NCAA clearinghouse requirements, you have to meet the universities academic standards.  

All athletes have an academic adviser.  There are several academic advisers on campus that only handle athletes.  They talk to the athlete and get to know them.  The academic adviser makes your schedule for you according to your major.  Athletes are the first students to have class schedules as the advisers schedule the classes around your athletic schedule.  My daughters golf team does not have class on Fridays.  

When you go to schools on official visits you meet the other players.  You will know real quick if you fit in or not.  The kids and parents also talk.  We found a couple of coaches that told us one thing and another recruit something the totally opposite on just general questions.  One of the schools the coach was fired within several months of our visit and we knew why.

When the student is in the 8th grade they need to start emailing and calling coaches.  My 7th grader will start doing these things this summer.  His schedule next year as an 8th grader will be near universities that he is interested in attending.  He will email and call the coaches and let them know that he will be in the area playing.

If you or anyone have a question about it, don't hesitate to pm me.

I was wondering what other people have encountered when they are recruiting and what problems they might have seen after they actually started. I know about talking to players and coaches and feeling like you fit in.

I often heard getting an athletic scholarship is like getting a job. I also heard that some of the top schools are "mills" and should be avoided.  Lots of people I know have kids who got scholarships not just golf and they all say look at the big picture of the program.  Sometimes you end up with a great coach but bad program or athletic director.

3

#4 jhfulton20

jhfulton20

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 490130
  • Joined: 01/04/2018
  • Location:Fulton Missouri
  • Handicap:8
  • Ebay ID:flyfishforreds
GolfWRX Likes : 7

Posted 25 January 2018 - 06:26 PM

As a high school coach and teacher, I will advise watching out for  schools that offer "scholarships".

Do the math always.    A 3000$ scholarship to a school with 21000$  tutition is not a good deal, unless that is your #1 academic choice. But you would be amazed at the parents who want this just for the fact that they can say billy bob is on a "golf, baseball...." scholarship.

4

#5 MathiasAndersen

MathiasAndersen

    Denmarkian

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 45 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 425488
  • Joined: 05/17/2016
  • Location:Denmark
  • Handicap:1.0
GolfWRX Likes : 12

Posted 26 January 2018 - 06:45 AM

Depending on how old your kid is I would recommend talking to as many coaches as possible. In the start it doesn't even matter if they are interested in the school or not, but asking questions about practice, fitness, recruiting, and qualifying and so on are important as it will give your kid a feel for how everything works. It's different for each school. Some schools have fitness training with the team 3 times a week, others don't at all. Ask questions, and if possible then find some previous students e-mails or phone numbers and call them ask what their perspective was versus the coaches, I'm sure many students would gladly talk about it.

Driver: Taylormade R15 460 9.5* - Graphite Design AD-DI 6X
Wood: Taylormade M1 2017 15* Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 70g S
Hybrid: Titleist 915Hd Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80g S
Driving Iron: Titleist 716 T-MB 3-iron KBS C-Taper Lite Stiff 110
Irons: Mizuno MP-15 4-p KBS C-Taper Stiff 120
Wedges: Titleist SM5 52*-08* F, 56*-10* M, 60*-07* S
Putter: Taylormade Spider Tour Black

Grips: Golfpride multi compound white/black
Ball: Pro V1

5

#6 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,970 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 1390

Posted 26 January 2018 - 11:16 AM

 jhfulton20, on 25 January 2018 - 06:26 PM, said:

As a high school coach and teacher, I will advise watching out for  schools that offer "scholarships".



Not sure I understand this.

6

#7 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 359 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 134

Posted 26 January 2018 - 07:49 PM

 heavy_hitter, on 26 January 2018 - 11:16 AM, said:

 jhfulton20, on 25 January 2018 - 06:26 PM, said:

As a high school coach and teacher, I will advise watching out for  schools that offer "scholarships".



Not sure I understand this.

The way i understand this is a lot schools out hike tuition and then offer lots of small scholarships to kids in the hope the will sign up because they get a scholarship and a chance to play a sport. I seen this a lot and you better off going to a good school you like and pay for it then go to a bad school.

Edited by tiger1873, 26 January 2018 - 07:49 PM.


7

#8 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,970 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 1390

Posted 27 January 2018 - 07:02 PM

 tiger1873, on 26 January 2018 - 07:49 PM, said:

 heavy_hitter, on 26 January 2018 - 11:16 AM, said:

 jhfulton20, on 25 January 2018 - 06:26 PM, said:

As a high school coach and teacher, I will advise watching out for  schools that offer "scholarships".



Not sure I understand this.

The way i understand this is a lot schools out hike tuition and then offer lots of small scholarships to kids in the hope the will sign up because they get a scholarship and a chance to play a sport. I seen this a lot and you better off going to a good school you like and pay for it then go to a bad school.

Schools do not hike up tuition.  Private schools charge what they want.  Public Universities are less expensive unless you go out of state.  Out of state universities have an out of state fee.  There is no way around that fee.

Golf is an equivalency sport.  Not everyone is offered full rides.  The NCAA limits scholarships to equivalency sports.  Girls D1 golf teams get 6 scholarships for an 8-14 girl squad.  Top 2 usually get full then they split 4 up for the rest.  D2 gets 5.4 scholarships, but the most they can offer athletically is 50%.  

In the NCAA there are only 4 head count sports for women.  Head count sports the only option is a full ride.  These sports are basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, and tennis.  Every other women’s sports has limitations.  It isn’t the school that determines these, it is the NCAA.

8

#9 tiger1873

tiger1873

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 359 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 340777
  • Joined: 09/20/2014
  • Location:United States
GolfWRX Likes : 134

Posted 28 January 2018 - 02:38 PM

 heavy_hitter, on 27 January 2018 - 07:02 PM, said:

 tiger1873, on 26 January 2018 - 07:49 PM, said:

 heavy_hitter, on 26 January 2018 - 11:16 AM, said:

 jhfulton20, on 25 January 2018 - 06:26 PM, said:

As a high school coach and teacher, I will advise watching out for  schools that offer "scholarships".



Not sure I understand this.

The way i understand this is a lot schools out hike tuition and then offer lots of small scholarships to kids in the hope the will sign up because they get a scholarship and a chance to play a sport. I seen this a lot and you better off going to a good school you like and pay for it then go to a bad school.

Schools do not hike up tuition.  Private schools charge what they want.  Public Universities are less expensive unless you go out of state.  Out of state universities have an out of state fee.  There is no way around that fee.

Golf is an equivalency sport.  Not everyone is offered full rides.  The NCAA limits scholarships to equivalency sports.  Girls D1 golf teams get 6 scholarships for an 8-14 girl squad.  Top 2 usually get full then they split 4 up for the rest.  D2 gets 5.4 scholarships, but the most they can offer athletically is 50%.  

In the NCAA there are only 4 head count sports for women.  Head count sports the only option is a full ride.  These sports are basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, and tennis.  Every other women’s sports has limitations.  It isn’t the school that determines these, it is the NCAA.

A lot D1 schools will offer academic scholarships with atheletic.  The end result is the same. This why academic study’s help a lot with schools.

9

#10 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,970 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 1390

Posted 28 January 2018 - 06:33 PM

 tiger1873, on 28 January 2018 - 02:38 PM, said:

 heavy_hitter, on 27 January 2018 - 07:02 PM, said:

 tiger1873, on 26 January 2018 - 07:49 PM, said:

 heavy_hitter, on 26 January 2018 - 11:16 AM, said:

 jhfulton20, on 25 January 2018 - 06:26 PM, said:

As a high school coach and teacher, I will advise watching out for  schools that offer "scholarships".



Not sure I understand this.

The way i understand this is a lot schools out hike tuition and then offer lots of small scholarships to kids in the hope the will sign up because they get a scholarship and a chance to play a sport. I seen this a lot and you better off going to a good school you like and pay for it then go to a bad school.

Schools do not hike up tuition.  Private schools charge what they want.  Public Universities are less expensive unless you go out of state.  Out of state universities have an out of state fee.  There is no way around that fee.

Golf is an equivalency sport.  Not everyone is offered full rides.  The NCAA limits scholarships to equivalency sports.  Girls D1 golf teams get 6 scholarships for an 8-14 girl squad.  Top 2 usually get full then they split 4 up for the rest.  D2 gets 5.4 scholarships, but the most they can offer athletically is 50%.  

In the NCAA there are only 4 head count sports for women.  Head count sports the only option is a full ride.  These sports are basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, and tennis.  Every other women’s sports has limitations.  It isn’t the school that determines these, it is the NCAA.

A lot D1 schools will offer academic scholarships with atheletic.  The end result is the same. This why academic study’s help a lot with schools.

It isn’t what the institute offers in Academic money.  It is what the students earn in academic money and they have to apply for it.  It isn’t given.  Anyone can get academic money from any collegiate institution in the country if they earn it.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 28 January 2018 - 06:34 PM.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


10

#11 mbs_59

mbs_59

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 46 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 429122
  • Joined: 06/14/2016
  • Location:TN
  • Handicap:0
GolfWRX Likes : 12

Posted 28 February 2018 - 10:42 PM

Recent college grad, played on a team.  Would suggest you look at how many players teams keep on their roster.  The smaller the roster, the better the comradery among teammates and of course the higher the scholarships.  NCAA golf teams only get 4.5 full scholarships to distribute to players; even less for D2, which I played.  I know a few teams we played against that would keep upwards of 20 players and kids just get lost then.  We kept 8-9 at most; keeps players pushing each other and even players who aren't traveling know they aren't far off.  PM me if you have any questions, would be happy to answer anything.

11

#12 kekoa

kekoa

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 7,646 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 66944
  • Joined: 10/02/2008
  • Location:in the hole
  • Handicap:4-20
GolfWRX Likes : 1530

Posted 01 March 2018 - 02:36 AM

I love threads like this.  My son has some time, but hopefully he is still playing and gets to go thru this process. Great info so far.
Taylormade M3 GD DI
Taylormade Aeroburnder 3&5 GD DI
Taylormade UDI 1,2 & 3
Miura CB-57 BB (5-PW)
Taylormade MG 52, 56
Taylormade Hi Toe 60*
Odyssey 1WS

12

#13 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,970 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 1390

Posted 01 March 2018 - 09:25 AM

 kekoa, on 01 March 2018 - 02:36 AM, said:

I love threads like this.  My son has some time, but hopefully he is still playing and gets to go thru this process. Great info so far.

I have said it before and will stress it again.  Grades are more important than golf.  If he Kekoa Jr. makes grades it is easier to get school paid for.

13

#14 kekoa

kekoa

  • ClubWRX Charter Members
  • 7,646 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 66944
  • Joined: 10/02/2008
  • Location:in the hole
  • Handicap:4-20
GolfWRX Likes : 1530

Posted 01 March 2018 - 12:18 PM

 heavy_hitter, on 01 March 2018 - 09:25 AM, said:

 kekoa, on 01 March 2018 - 02:36 AM, said:

I love threads like this.  My son has some time, but hopefully he is still playing and gets to go thru this process. Great info so far.

I have said it before and will stress it again.  Grades are more important than golf.  If he Kekoa Jr. makes grades it is easier to get school paid for.

Damn, he is in deep sh*t then. :to_become_senile:
Taylormade M3 GD DI
Taylormade Aeroburnder 3&5 GD DI
Taylormade UDI 1,2 & 3
Miura CB-57 BB (5-PW)
Taylormade MG 52, 56
Taylormade Hi Toe 60*
Odyssey 1WS

14

#15 hattrick23

hattrick23

    hattrick23

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 10 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 287211
  • Joined: 12/09/2013
  • Location:Florida
  • Handicap:8
GolfWRX Likes : 3

Posted 01 March 2018 - 09:04 PM

 tiger1873, on 25 January 2018 - 11:15 AM, said:

I am looking around the internet and I don't see anything about this.  I know you have to start early on getting together a list of colleges and be proactive if your kids want to get a good scholarship.

Looking over college programs I have notice many places are not created equal.  So what is some things we need to watch out for? Obviously a bad cultural fit is big no no.  I would think a program where the kids are not graduating or encouraged to take "easy classes" is just as bad.

As heavy hitter stated above, there are additional resources to read about visiting schools. You cannot start too early, 8th grade is a good start for the top programs. Try to visit different type campuses; large state universities, small privates, larger privates to get a feel for the environment your child prefers. Large schools offer more options such as big time sports and clubs, more choice in majors, etc but the interaction will usually be less personal.

You will also need to identify the talent level of your child. My advise is to target schools where you will have a good chance to make the lineup for most of the tournaments. It is no fun if you don't get a chance to play even if it is a "famous school". Your best fit is not always the highest ranked program.

The more schools you visit will help answer the questions you may have.
Just for reference: I have two sons who played Division 1 golf at a mid major school with one son as a senior next year. The older son did not play as often as he would have liked but the younger son has played in all tournaments since freshman year and has enjoyed his time in school. They have many friends who went to play college golf and a decent majority have transferred since they chased the highest ranked program and ended up not playing as often as they envisioned.
It is a lot of work (and money) to visit many schools but in the end it results in a more informed decision. Have fun and enjoy the ride!


15

#16 RangerV

RangerV

    My ProV’s are frozen

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 88 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 408510
  • Joined: 01/11/2016
  • Location:Minnesota
  • Handicap:0
GolfWRX Likes : 31

Posted 02 March 2018 - 12:53 PM

I wouldn’t push visits and  academics (looking at schools with their programs) until they are a little older. A lot changes from 8th grade until graduation.
Grades are very important as schools have a lot more money to offer there than they do with athletic scholarships.
Get on coaches radars early but it’s not life or death if your kid doesn’t have a scholarship locked up by 10th grade.
2017 TM M2 w/ UST Elements Chrome 7f5t
2016 TM M2 3HL w/UST VTS Black 8X
Mizuno Mp FliHi Cut Muscle w/ TI DG X100
Mizuno Mp59 w/ TI DG X100
Titleist Vokey SM6 50* w/ DG s400
Titleist Vokey SM5 54/60* w/ DG s400
Bettinardi Studio Stock 16 w/ white Iomic

16

#17 ANG

ANG

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 175 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 56932
  • Joined: 05/31/2008
GolfWRX Likes : 57

Posted 03 March 2018 - 09:20 AM

 tiger1873, on 25 January 2018 - 11:15 AM, said:

I am looking around the internet and I don't see anything about this.  I know you have to start early on getting together a list of colleges and be proactive if your kids want to get a good scholarship.

Looking over college programs I have notice many places are not created equal.  So what is some things we need to watch out for? Obviously a bad cultural fit is big no no.  I would think a program where the kids are not graduating or encouraged to take "easy classes" is just as bad.

On the average there are 10 kids on a team. 4.5 scholarships are available. Generally 2 incoming freshmans. Unless you are a highly sought after recruit and top junior golfer in the country, there are no "good scholarships" .

17

#18 heavy_hitter

heavy_hitter

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,970 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 366715
  • Joined: 03/16/2015
GolfWRX Likes : 1390

Posted 03 March 2018 - 10:42 AM

 ANG, on 03 March 2018 - 09:20 AM, said:

 tiger1873, on 25 January 2018 - 11:15 AM, said:

I am looking around the internet and I don't see anything about this.  I know you have to start early on getting together a list of colleges and be proactive if your kids want to get a good scholarship.

Looking over college programs I have notice many places are not created equal.  So what is some things we need to watch out for? Obviously a bad cultural fit is big no no.  I would think a program where the kids are not graduating or encouraged to take "easy classes" is just as bad.

On the average there are 10 kids on a team. 4.5 scholarships are available. Generally 2 incoming freshmans. Unless you are a highly sought after recruit and top junior golfer in the country, there are no "good scholarships" .

Different for girls.

18

#19 mbs_59

mbs_59

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 46 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 429122
  • Joined: 06/14/2016
  • Location:TN
  • Handicap:0
GolfWRX Likes : 12

Posted 04 March 2018 - 11:07 PM

 heavy_hitter, on 03 March 2018 - 10:42 AM, said:

 ANG, on 03 March 2018 - 09:20 AM, said:

 tiger1873, on 25 January 2018 - 11:15 AM, said:

I am looking around the internet and I don't see anything about this.  I know you have to start early on getting together a list of colleges and be proactive if your kids want to get a good scholarship.

Looking over college programs I have notice many places are not created equal.  So what is some things we need to watch out for? Obviously a bad cultural fit is big no no.  I would think a program where the kids are not graduating or encouraged to take "easy classes" is just as bad.

On the average there are 10 kids on a team. 4.5 scholarships are available. Generally 2 incoming freshmans. Unless you are a highly sought after recruit and top junior golfer in the country, there are no "good scholarships" .

Different for girls.

Definitely is different for girls because they get 6 scholarships instead of 4.5 and there are generally less girls on teams and in general who seek to play collegiate golf.  Also would say there are good scholarships, they just may be relative.  Better chance of getting a higher amount of scholarship if the junior considers a lower level school where he would be one of if not the best player.  Academics is EXTREMELY important.  I did not even come close to getting a full ride but with academic and golf scholarship together, was able to get almost all of my school paid for.

19

#20 Nevergolfpar

Nevergolfpar

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 393204
  • Joined: 08/26/2015
  • Location:Florida
  • Handicap:14
GolfWRX Likes : 61

Posted 08 March 2018 - 01:27 AM

The post by Hattrick above is spot on regarding sending your son/daughter to a program in which he/she is going to make the travel team.  Some other things to consider off the top of my head:

1) Make sure the program is fully funded.  Some programs are not.  It is not unheard of, where student athletes are paying for their own food during away tournaments.
2) See if the team does anything during Spring Break.  My son's team usually travels to Florida for a golf trip, a week before playing in an event.
3) Look at alumni involvement.  See if the alumni are heavily involved in the program...if so, you son/daughter will have opportunities to play with them.  Even better if they play on a major tour.
4) What courses will they have access to?  My son's team has access to 5 or 6 other courses besides their home course on campus.  They also often get invited to play some extremely private clubs in the area by alumni from the university (not necessarily from the golf team).
5) What type of commitment does the university have towards the golf team?  A team in my son's conference, went from fully funded, to a partially funded program.
6) Unless your son is a top recruit, he is not getting a full ride his freshman year.  Not going to happen.  Find out the criteria for an increase in scholarship monies the next 3 years (which is why Hattrick's statement is so correct), if they do not prove their worth on golf course, the scholarship is not going to increase Sophomore year.  Very important your son make the traveling team Freshman year.
7) Look at the makeup of the team.  Which players make up the traveling team?  Are they Senior's or Freshman?  Could impact your son's ability to make traveling team Freshman year.
8) Look at the various rosters online, going back 10 years or so.  Was there a lot of turnover/dropout of players other than graduation?  For example, how many of the original recruits played on the team all four years?  Some turnover, may be healthy of a competitive program, but too much could suggest a problem with a coach or something else?  Rarely, do all recruits make it to senior year.  Of the 3 recruits my son's university signed in the fall of 15', my son is the only one left, as the other 2 were not good enough and transferred.   If you see, traveling players dropping out it could mean a coaching problem or a universities lack of commitment to scholastics.  

If I think of any more, I will add them later.

Cheers


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


Wanna get rid of this ugly yellow box? And remove other annoying "stuff" in between posts? Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

20

#21 hrmgolf72

hrmgolf72

    hrmgolf

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 491714
  • Joined: 01/23/2018
  • Location:atlanta
  • Handicap:+1
GolfWRX Likes : 12

Posted 10 March 2018 - 09:26 PM

I play college golf and if you like the coach and like the courses that the team plays at then you'll be fine. If you don't you're screwed. Schools will work with you bc of how much class you miss

21

#22 hrmgolf72

hrmgolf72

    hrmgolf

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 75 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 491714
  • Joined: 01/23/2018
  • Location:atlanta
  • Handicap:+1
GolfWRX Likes : 12

Posted 12 March 2018 - 08:19 PM

 Nevergolfpar, on 08 March 2018 - 01:27 AM, said:

The post by Hattrick above is spot on regarding sending your son/daughter to a program in which he/she is going to make the travel team.  Some other things to consider off the top of my head:

1) Make sure the program is fully funded.  Some programs are not.  It is not unheard of, where student athletes are paying for their own food during away tournaments.
2) See if the team does anything during Spring Break.  My son's team usually travels to Florida for a golf trip, a week before playing in an event.
3) Look at alumni involvement.  See if the alumni are heavily involved in the program...if so, you son/daughter will have opportunities to play with them.  Even better if they play on a major tour.
4) What courses will they have access to?  My son's team has access to 5 or 6 other courses besides their home course on campus.  They also often get invited to play some extremely private clubs in the area by alumni from the university (not necessarily from the golf team).
5) What type of commitment does the university have towards the golf team?  A team in my son's conference, went from fully funded, to a partially funded program.
6) Unless your son is a top recruit, he is not getting a full ride his freshman year.  Not going to happen.  Find out the criteria for an increase in scholarship monies the next 3 years (which is why Hattrick's statement is so correct), if they do not prove their worth on golf course, the scholarship is not going to increase Sophomore year.  Very important your son make the traveling team Freshman year.
7) Look at the makeup of the team.  Which players make up the traveling team?  Are they Senior's or Freshman?  Could impact your son's ability to make traveling team Freshman year.
8) Look at the various rosters online, going back 10 years or so.  Was there a lot of turnover/dropout of players other than graduation?  For example, how many of the original recruits played on the team all four years?  Some turnover, may be healthy of a competitive program, but too much could suggest a problem with a coach or something else?  Rarely, do all recruits make it to senior year.  Of the 3 recruits my son's university signed in the fall of 15', my son is the only one left, as the other 2 were not good enough and transferred.   If you see, traveling players dropping out it could mean a coaching problem or a universities lack of commitment to scholastics.  

If I think of any more, I will add them later.

Cheers



# 8 is important and sorta what I just refrenced in my previous post. our team has expereinced four kids in the past year and a half come in and drop out withing a year or even a semester, that is probably the best judgement to see how the program is run.

22



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

GolfWRX Sponsors