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Refinishing iron heads using Multitool 36x2 belt grinder attachment

multi tool convolute wheel trick tools iron head grind media blast belt sander Poly brite abravises

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#1 wis99ski

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 09:51 PM

I have a few sets of old blade heads and after reading quite a few success stories on guys hand sanding bag chatter and some dings and dents out before either media blasting or having them re-chromed/plated etc. I have become intrigued to want to at least try it on one spare set of heads to see if I can remove the dings and dents without putting waves in the heads (which from reading is very easy to screw up with a Dremel or belt sander)

Some guys say with a little patience you can do it with the Multitool 36x2" belt grinder attachment from Trick Tools.  http://www.trick-too...hment_MT362_305

Multi Tool thread for irons http://www.golfwrx.c...812493-grinder/

I know you can just send the heads out to a few of the reputable companies here and have them completely restored for around the price of the multi tool, but I think there would be a lot more satisfaction looking down at a fresh set of heads you redid yourself. I have a polishing and plating shop near me that could plate the heads in various finishes.  I still think I may send a couple sets of heads out to have redone but I like working with my hands and would be immensely satisfied successfully doing it myself.  

Have any of you guys redone and cleaned up iron heads with a multi tool? I would enjoy hearing about your experiences and seeing some before and after pics.  Thanks.

Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#2 RogerinNewZealand

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:16 PM

Give it a go !
Please add pics at start and as you go !!
Roger
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#3 onetime19

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:23 PM

http://www.golfwrx.c...l#entry16466956

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#4 wis99ski

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 10:46 PM

^ wow those pings are nice. Yeah itís nice looking down at an iron that suits your eye but an iron that you hand worked yourself back to itís original glory seems fun
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#5 Nessism

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 08:39 AM

Before removing chatter and scratches you need to have the chrome stripped.  After that, you can use a multitude of different tools and equipment, just pick your preference.  That belt sander tool looks quite expensive overall to me.  You can accomplish the same thing using hand tools and sandpaper roll strips.  Nice thing about the hand approach is you don't need to worry about damaging the head from too much material removal, plus it's therapeutic in a "get your hands dirty" sort of way.  One thing though: you need a good sturdy workbench and vice to hold the head.

Ping G400 driver w/Adila Rogue 125 Silver 60S
TEE XCG6 3 & 5 fairway woods & E8 hybrid
Mizuno Hot Metal irons w/Recoil 95's
Glide 50/55/60 wedges w/Recoil 110's
Ping Anser putter - the "real deal!"

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#6 wis99ski

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:17 AM

View PostNessism, on 11 January 2018 - 08:39 AM, said:

Before removing chatter and scratches you need to have the chrome stripped.  After that, you can use a multitude of different tools and equipment, just pick your preference.  That belt sander tool looks quite expensive overall to me.  You can accomplish the same thing using hand tools and sandpaper roll strips.  Nice thing about the hand approach is you don't need to worry about damaging the head from too much material removal, plus it's therapeutic in a "get your hands dirty" sort of way.  One thing though: you need a good sturdy workbench and vice to hold the head.
.
How long would you say it would take you to do 7-8 forged iron heads with a fair amount of dings and nicks on the soles, top line with some bag chatter?
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#7 wkuo3

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 11:40 AM

:worth:

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#8 juice744

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:08 PM

Depending on the depth of the chatter / dings, you may want to start with a small hammer. Make sure the hammer face is smooth and rounded off. (Sand it flat). Take the hammer and tap on the ding until the metal is pushed back into the dent. When a ding is formed on a clubhead, the metal is displaced. It pushes out and up creating a raised lip around the void. You are trying to push that raised lip back in to fill the hole.
Do this for any dent that looks deep enough to still be present after removing the plating.

I have fixed some severe dings this was. Wedges with pea size whammy's on the leading edge. Putters with ratty looking heads im refinishing... etc.

Just remember, once you sand/grind the metal, that metal is gone forever, along with the weight. Grinding and sanding should be the last step after all else.

This is a technique i learned on these forums a few years back. It works wonders. Its referred to as "cold forging"

You will be amazed at how much of a difference you can make with just a small smooth face hammer and so patience.

Good luck!



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#9 wis99ski

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 01:10 PM

View Postjuice744, on 11 January 2018 - 12:08 PM, said:

Depending on the depth of the chatter / dings, you may want to start with a small hammer. Make sure the hammer face is smooth and rounded off. (Sand it flat). Take the hammer and tap on the ding until the metal is pushed back into the dent. When a ding is formed on a clubhead, the metal is displaced. It pushes out and up creating a raised lip around the void. You are trying to push that raised lip back in to fill the hole.
Do this for any dent that looks deep enough to still be present after removing the plating.

I have fixed some severe dings this was. Wedges with pea size whammy's on the leading edge. Putters with ratty looking heads im refinishing... etc.

Just remember, once you sand/grind the metal, that metal is gone forever, along with the weight. Grinding and sanding should be the last step after all else.

This is a technique i learned on these forums a few years back. It works wonders. Its referred to as "cold forging"

You will be amazed at how much of a difference you can make with just a small smooth face hammer and so patience.

Good luck!

Great advice on the cold forging as a prep for any grinding/polishing.   I need a bench grinder anyway as I use my neighbors from time to time.  It looks like multi tool has a 3/4hp grinder/polisher with the tool installed @ $399 seems a little pricey for a 3/4hp.Screen Shot 2018-01-11 at 1.00.00 PM.png

Do you guys prefer the longer axle of a buffer or just use a grinder to attach?
I would probably a 6" or 8" buffer/polisher for ~$100 but not sure if I should just go the buffer/polisher route without a grind wheel on the left side?
https://www.amazon.c...der/buffer&th=1
Screen Shot 2018-01-11 at 12.59.04 PM.png
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#10 Nessism

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 02:24 PM

Instead of a sander that you won't use very often I suggest a quality bench grinder like a Jet 6".  Not one of those chinese jobbies with the fat motor.  And then buy a 3m abrasive wheel to sand down the heads.  That will save you a lot of hand labor.  You can also get a cut off wheel for chopping shafts.  

To sand out scratches by hand figure on spending about 1 hour/head.  Maybe less after you get your process running smooth.



https://www.amazon.c...r/dp/B00004T9KV

Posted Image

Edited by Nessism, 11 January 2018 - 02:31 PM.

Ping G400 driver w/Adila Rogue 125 Silver 60S
TEE XCG6 3 & 5 fairway woods & E8 hybrid
Mizuno Hot Metal irons w/Recoil 95's
Glide 50/55/60 wedges w/Recoil 110's
Ping Anser putter - the "real deal!"

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#11 juice744

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 06:04 PM

After the cold forging, i use a combo of 3 different machines.
A 6" 3/4hp bench grinder (Chinese made, but i got new in the box at goodwill for like $8) and its a workhorse. I have a small machine shop in my basement (lathe, mill, bandsaw,..etc) and its held up to alot of use on my various projects.
On that machine i have 1 side set up with a 80 grit alum-oxide wheel (which i rarely use, especially not on golfclubs), and the other side set up with a soft cloth 6" polishing/buffing wheel. I use "brown" general purpose tripoli buffing rouge stick. I find the brown to be a great middle of the road for all materials. From aluminum to stainless, to carbon steel and brass.  (For final shine on metal, or plastic, i sometimes use liquid automotive polish).
Honestly, for like $25 you can probably get a similar grinder from harbor freight and it will last just fine. They are not precision machines. Just a motor with 2 shafts. Mine is chinese and i beat the crap out of it.

The other machine i use, and MUCH more than the bench grinder. Is a 2"x72" (1HP) "knifemakers" belt grinder. I built this machine myself and it absolutly is the best tool ive ever created.(by built myself, i mean... got a 1hp pool pump motor, welded a steel frame together, turned all the aluminum pulleys on my lathe, designed a tracking mechanism, belt tension is controlled using an old gas lift piston from my car trunk, the flat platen yo grind against is a piece of pyrex glass backed with steel) For reshaping soles on clubheads, you can "slack belt" grind, which means using the belt tensioner and an unsuported section of belt to let the belt natrually follow the contour of the clubhead. I have a variety of different texture belts.
** the tool i would tell you to buy over anything else is the 1x30 belt grinder from harbpr freight. Its like $35 and its awesome.** i got my dad one, he says "i'll never use that. I have a bench grinder". 3 years later he still sends me a text and says "i used the belt grinder again, i love this thing" every time he uses it.
You shpuld definitely get one.

For the nooks and crannys, i use a dremmel tool. But heres the thing. For a small and harmless looking as it is, the dremmel always dose the most damage if you dont go very carefully. It has a tendancy to jump over an outside corner and start chewing into the surface perpandicular to the one ypu were trying to use it on.
For this reason, i never use aggressive bits on delicate items.
** i really like the little sanding sponges. Not syre what they are called. They feel like crusty sponges.(seen in photo, the red and green bits) They are great at soft smooth finishing and have little chance of destroying your project. They natrually follow the existing contours, as opposed to a sanding drum or stone, where the metal becomes the shape of the tool bit.
...you can also get small cotton polishing pads for finishing the nooks and crannys with the dremmel.

Good luck

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#12 wis99ski

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 09:58 PM

View Postjuice744, on 12 January 2018 - 06:04 PM, said:

After the cold forging, i use a combo of 3 different machines.
A 6" 3/4hp bench grinder (Chinese made, but i got new in the box at goodwill for like $8) and its a workhorse. I have a small machine shop in my basement (lathe, mill, bandsaw,..etc) and its held up to alot of use on my various projects.
On that machine i have 1 side set up with a 80 grit alum-oxide wheel (which i rarely use, especially not on golfclubs), and the other side set up with a soft cloth 6" polishing/buffing wheel. I use "brown" general purpose tripoli buffing rouge stick. I find the brown to be a great middle of the road for all materials. From aluminum to stainless, to carbon steel and brass.  (For final shine on metal, or plastic, i sometimes use liquid automotive polish).
Honestly, for like $25 you can probably get a similar grinder from harbor freight and it will last just fine. They are not precision machines. Just a motor with 2 shafts. Mine is chinese and i beat the crap out of it.

The other machine i use, and MUCH more than the bench grinder. Is a 2"x72" (1HP) "knifemakers" belt grinder. I built this machine myself and it absolutly is the best tool ive ever created.(by built myself, i mean... got a 1hp pool pump motor, welded a steel frame together, turned all the aluminum pulleys on my lathe, designed a tracking mechanism, belt tension is controlled using an old gas lift piston from my car trunk, the flat platen yo grind against is a piece of pyrex glass backed with steel) For reshaping soles on clubheads, you can "slack belt" grind, which means using the belt tensioner and an unsuported section of belt to let the belt natrually follow the contour of the clubhead. I have a variety of different texture belts.
** the tool i would tell you to buy over anything else is the 1x30 belt grinder from harbpr freight. Its like $35 and its awesome.** i got my dad one, he says "i'll never use that. I have a bench grinder". 3 years later he still sends me a text and says "i used the belt grinder again, i love this thing" every time he uses it.
You shpuld definitely get one.

For the nooks and crannys, i use a dremmel tool. But heres the thing. For a small and harmless looking as it is, the dremmel always dose the most damage if you dont go very carefully. It has a tendancy to jump over an outside corner and start chewing into the surface perpandicular to the one ypu were trying to use it on.
For this reason, i never use aggressive bits on delicate items.
** i really like the little sanding sponges. Not syre what they are called. They feel like crusty sponges.(seen in photo, the red and green bits) They are great at soft smooth finishing and have little chance of destroying your project. They natrually follow the existing contours, as opposed to a sanding drum or stone, where the metal becomes the shape of the tool bit.
...you can also get small cotton polishing pads for finishing the nooks and crannys with the dremmel.

Good luck

Wow, great work I would like to see a video of the "knifemaker". Thanks for the insight and tips.
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#13 juice744

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 12:44 AM

Lol.
Just to be clear, i have never made any knives. "Knifemakers belt grinder" is just the generally accepted term for a grinder that runs a 2" x 72" belt. (Because that is the the size machine custome knife makers use). I just built it because of the versatility.
I can post up a few pics tomorrow... or a video if i can figure out how to do that

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#14 wis99ski

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 07:19 PM

Does anyone have any idea about how many grams are removed from a typical Mizuno muscle back head when typical nicks, dings and chatter are removed if they buffed and ground/sanded out (not considering chrome removal because it will be added back)?  I understand that "cold forging" as much of the damage is ideal as to not lose head weight.
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#15 juice744

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 09:27 PM

So here are a few pics of my homemade 1 horsepower, 2x72 "knifemakers" belt grinder.
The frame is just some scrap steel welded together. The main arm is a square tube within a larger square tube that allows it to extend out for adjustment. The black cylinder is the "tension" mechanism. Its a worn out gas piston from my car trunk.
The closeup of the flat grinding surface "the platen" shows the pyrex glass backing and the adjustable angle setting lever. Then theres the tracking assembly at the top of the tension arm. That pulley is crowned (dome shaped). The bolt pushes the crowned pulley in/out on a hinged lever and the belt follows the top of the crown so it can be centered.
The large black drive wheel is a plastic lawnmower wheel i cut down in the lathe. The other aluminum pulleys i made from bar stock on the lathe, and the big green wheel is called a "contact wheel". Its a heavy duty cast iron wheel with a urethane tire molded onto it. I trued it up on the lathe as well. The idea behind the contact wheel is that the soft urethane allows you to grind using the wheel as the backing for the belt. Allowing a perfectly ground large radius (or a hollow/concave grind on knife blades). I never used the contact wheel, but i figured i might as well make one while i was building it.
Some of the 2x72 grinders you can buy are like $2000. This one cost me under 100 bucks including the motor.

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#16 juice744

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 09:46 PM

Also, since im already in my shop...
You can use this to guide you concerning metal removal and weight.
2 grams of weight in head = 1 swingweight point.
The picture shows a piece of 1018 low carbon "mild steel" (which for our purposes you can consider identical to the 1020/1025 steel most forged heads are made from). That little block is 2 grams.
So a cube approx 1/4" x 1/4" x 1/4" is 1 swingweight point.

Attached Thumbnails

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#17 wis99ski

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 10:00 PM

Wow thats pretty incredible. Great info too.  I would also assume that if you have really beat up heads you would lose possibly 1 swingweight point but couldn't that be added back with a tip weight?
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#18 juice744

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 09:53 AM

Ye, you can add weight back through tip weighting, or longer shaft, or lighter grip. With tip weighting, its better to have the weight distributed evenly through the head (as the material is before you grind it off). If you start adding alot of tip weighting (say..over 5 grams or so) it might start to effect the clubs center of gravity or feel. But not by much hopefully.


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#19 wis99ski

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 12:28 PM

View Postjuice744, on 15 January 2018 - 09:53 AM, said:

Ye, you can add weight back through tip weighting, or longer shaft, or lighter grip. With tip weighting, its better to have the weight distributed evenly through the head (as the material is before you grind it off). If you start adding alot of tip weighting (say..over 5 grams or so) it might start to effect the clubs center of gravity or feel. But not by much hopefully.

Yeah and also I have a couple ideas of what new plating I would go with.  Obviously there is nickel & chrome but a couple others as well.  This shop has "We also can now x-ray the thickness of plating on MicroPioneer XRF 2000 by UPA Technology" Which to me will give me an idea of the thickness and weight being added back through various plating options.  

Screen Shot 2018-01-15 at 10.39.56 AM.png
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

19

#20 wis99ski

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 05:52 PM

Also I haven't read there are 2 nickel layers before and I've been doing some digging and didnt see anyone mention it. Per Mizuno R&D rep "Chrome: This is our most popular, most commonly used, as well as most durable. What we use is a Double Nickel Chrome plating. This means that there are two layers of nickel before a layer of chrome on top. The nickel adds to the soft feel and and chrome allows for a very shiny durable finish. This is a plated finish meaning that it will protect the club from rust."

The interesting thing to me is the number of layers of nickel.  Has anyone done more than 2 layers of nickel with a chrome layer? I would assume you could mess around with swingweights given that on average each layer is around 1.5grams.  

I also looked up some wild DIY chrome -> nickel stripping threads, and was pretty amazing of the undertaking some people went through to strip the chrome and nickel themselves.

Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#21 overparfornow

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 09:06 AM

What is the best way to remove the chrome from the heads Nessim or anyone that has done it? THANKS!
Driver:    Ping G30 10.5* Stiff TFC419
3 Wood: Callaway XHot 15* Project X PXV Stiff
5 Wood: Callaway Big Bertha 18* Diablo Aldila DVS Stiff
7 Wood: Callaway XHot Project X PXV Regular
Irons:      Ping G30 4-PW, GW, SW Stiff TFC419 Graphite, Titleist Vokey SM5 60* L Grind
Putter:    Nike BC101 Putter 35"

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#22 wis99ski

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 09:16 AM

View Postoverparfornow, on 16 January 2018 - 09:06 AM, said:

What is the best way to remove the chrome from the heads Nessim or anyone that has done it? THANKS!

Just the chrome and leaving the nickel? I've read a ton of posts, consensus is to take it to an actual plating shop so you dont have to deal with the chemical by-products and you dont ruin your heads due to serious pitting if you're going down to raw. Also make sure you are abiding by your local/state laws etc.  From what I've read chrome can be stripped far easier than the nickel underneath.  So it depends on what you actually want to do.
http://www.golfwrx.c...me-of-my-clubs/

Edited by wis99ski, 16 January 2018 - 09:16 AM.

Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

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#23 Nessism

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 10:07 AM

wis99ski is on top of things; great job searching out info about how to strip heads and such.  

I wouldn't read too much into that "double nickel" business.  The same nickel thickness (or near anyway) could be achieved by simply leaving the heads in the nickel plating tank longer than one normal cycle.  As far as plating affecting feel, that's a very debatable point and I'm of the belief that it won't.
Ping G400 driver w/Adila Rogue 125 Silver 60S
TEE XCG6 3 & 5 fairway woods & E8 hybrid
Mizuno Hot Metal irons w/Recoil 95's
Glide 50/55/60 wedges w/Recoil 110's
Ping Anser putter - the "real deal!"

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#24 wis99ski

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 04:47 PM

View PostNessism, on 16 January 2018 - 10:07 AM, said:

wis99ski is on top of things; great job searching out info about how to strip heads and such.  

I wouldn't read too much into that "double nickel" business.  The same nickel thickness (or near anyway) could be achieved by simply leaving the heads in the nickel plating tank longer than one normal cycle.  As far as plating affecting feel, that's a very debatable point and I'm of the belief that it won't.

Good point.  I will have the thickness of the coatings x-rayed, because this shop says they can measure the thickness of the coatings.  So I could say I want the nickel to be "x" thick and the chrome to be "x" thick.  Im sure they just time how long it stays in.  I dont know much about the timing process but im sure its easily measured.
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

24

#25 wis99ski

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 11:18 PM

This sounds pretty legitimate but can anyone confirm that "during the factory plating process they cover the groves/faces with an insulator so that they don't get the chrome.  When you watch one of the mizuno videos when they're plating you'll see the black rubber that sits on the heads.  Other people that re-do clubs sometimes have them plated, then blast them, but you won't get the same finish as factory on the grooves.  And the grooves will be less sharp after you blast them."

So that would in part possibly explain why some people complain after having clubs rechromed they dont "feel" like they used to because they are chroming over the face vs. having it stop at nickel plating? I havent see the video of the black rubber that sits on the faces, has anyone?

Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

25

#26 Nessism

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 07:50 AM

View Postwis99ski, on 16 January 2018 - 11:18 PM, said:

This sounds pretty legitimate but can anyone confirm that "during the factory plating process they cover the groves/faces with an insulator so that they don't get the chrome.  When you watch one of the mizuno videos when they're plating you'll see the black rubber that sits on the heads.  Other people that re-do clubs sometimes have them plated, then blast them, but you won't get the same finish as factory on the grooves.  And the grooves will be less sharp after you blast them."

So that would in part possibly explain why some people complain after having clubs rechromed they dont "feel" like they used to because they are chroming over the face vs. having it stop at nickel plating? I havent see the video of the black rubber that sits on the faces, has anyone?

Pretty sure the entire club, other than inside the hosel, is plated through all steps.  

The nickel has a slightly yellow color to it and after someone uses their chrome irons for a while you will start to see the yellow under layer showing through on the sole and face.  This signifies the chrome is worn off and the nickel is showing.  Once the nickel is gone you get rust.
Ping G400 driver w/Adila Rogue 125 Silver 60S
TEE XCG6 3 & 5 fairway woods & E8 hybrid
Mizuno Hot Metal irons w/Recoil 95's
Glide 50/55/60 wedges w/Recoil 110's
Ping Anser putter - the "real deal!"

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#27 wis99ski

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 11:42 AM

View PostNessism, on 17 January 2018 - 07:50 AM, said:

View Postwis99ski, on 16 January 2018 - 11:18 PM, said:

This sounds pretty legitimate but can anyone confirm that "during the factory plating process they cover the groves/faces with an insulator so that they don't get the chrome.  When you watch one of the mizuno videos when they're plating you'll see the black rubber that sits on the heads.  Other people that re-do clubs sometimes have them plated, then blast them, but you won't get the same finish as factory on the grooves.  And the grooves will be less sharp after you blast them."

So that would in part possibly explain why some people complain after having clubs rechromed they dont "feel" like they used to because they are chroming over the face vs. having it stop at nickel plating? I havent see the video of the black rubber that sits on the faces, has anyone?

Pretty sure the entire club, other than inside the hosel, is plated through all steps.  

The nickel has a slightly yellow color to it and after someone uses their chrome irons for a while you will start to see the yellow under layer showing through on the sole and face.  This signifies the chrome is worn off and the nickel is showing.  Once the nickel is gone you get rust.

Exactly correct.  Per Mizuno "Entire clubhead has the same plating"
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

27

#28 PALS-SSA

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 02:42 PM

Consider a layer of copper underneath like the TN-87 mizunos.  Iron Factory uses this to add some weight back as well from the grinding.

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#29 wis99ski

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 08:12 PM

View PostPALS-SSA, on 17 January 2018 - 02:42 PM, said:

Consider a layer of copper underneath like the TN-87 mizunos.  Iron Factory uses this to add some weight back as well from the grinding.
I have entertained that idea but I think the likes of Mizuno have stopped using a copper base. I have MP-32s that I am looking to refurb.  Once I talk to the shop and give them the specs of each coat thickness I should have a better idea.
Driver: Mizuno JPX 900 with Kuro Kage Silver Dual Core TiNi 80 X
Fairway: 3W Tour Edge Exotics Beta Ti with Kuro Kage Silver TiNi 80 S
Hybrid: Tour Edge Exotics EX9 Tour 18* with UST Mamiya Recoil S

Irons: Mizuno JPX 850 forged and MP-32 with Nippon Modus3 120 X
Driving Iron: Exotics CB PROh 18* with Fujikura Fuel Tour 70 S

Wedges: Scratch 47, Mizuno T5 53*-11, 57*-12 with Modus Wedge 125

Putter: Cure RX5

29

#30 juice744

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Posted 18 January 2018 - 12:18 AM

"Good" chrome used to use copper plating, then chrome. It adheres much better that way.
New technology, with nickel and whatnot, copper probably not necessary, outdated,... and most importantly, more expensive.

Concerning the face... here is what i would do.
Get the whole head plated. The price would start to accumulate rapidly if you begin requesting portions to be insulated and not chromed.
After you get the clubhead back, tape off the entire head, aside from the rectangular "window" on the face. Sand/Soda blast the window so you get a nice satin look in the strike zone. Then cut the grooves in, either manually with a tool, or send out to be cut by machine.
*i would also cut the grooves by hand before plating to square them up and make sure the plating lays even*


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