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#1 leezer99

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 07:15 PM

We've all heard the story and know that anyone can be a victim of early flameout but there's a great podcast (48 minutes long) on golfdigest.com about Ty Tryon.  At the end the interviewer gets a chance to speak with Ty and it's really eye opening.  I highly recommend a listen when you have the time.

Chasing Ty Tryon


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#2 CTgolf

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM

Great podcast

It made me wonder, if he had taken the conventional route that is popular among top amateurs now (go to college and play until dominant before trying to play professionally), whether he would have been more successful and on tour today.

I do think failing and learning how to react/respond to it is important in every endeavor in life; there are so many examples of kids who were extremely talented and dominant right from the start (not just in sports), when they eventually ran into challenges or obstacles (or just better competition), just fell apart and never recovered.  Almost seems like experiencing failure/challenges early (and maybe even often) is important to a junior's development path.

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#3 heavy_hitter

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 09:17 AM

Thanks for sharing.

Success today doesn't guarantee tomorrow.  You certainly hear of more failures than you do success stories.  Making it is less odds than winning the lottery.  It is hard work and at times down right luck.

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#4 leezer99

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 09:19 AM

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

Almost seems like experiencing failure/challenges early (and maybe even often) is important to a junior's development path.

I think this is true in most endeavours... just ask Elon.

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

It made me wonder, if he had taken the conventional route that is popular among top amateurs now (go to college and play until dominant before trying to play professionally), whether he would have been more successful and on tour today.

This is a very interesting statement... seems like most boys go to college for at least a year but women are going pro much faster.  I don't know why it seems to be like that but one theory I've heard is that since the LPGA doesn't pay out as much as the PGA they have to get what they can when they can.

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#5 Sean2

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 09:32 AM

View Postleezer99, on 11 January 2018 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

Almost seems like experiencing failure/challenges early (and maybe even often) is important to a junior's development path.

I think this is true in most endeavours... just ask Elon.

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

It made me wonder, if he had taken the conventional route that is popular among top amateurs now (go to college and play until dominant before trying to play professionally), whether he would have been more successful and on tour today.

This is a very interesting statement... seems like most boys go to college for at least a year but women are going pro much faster.  I don't know why it seems to be like that but one theory I've heard is that since the LPGA doesn't pay out as much as the PGA they have to get what they can when they can.

A good friend of mine's daughter went to the LPGA right out of high school. She is now beginning her 3rd season. Given her skill level at the time, it would have seemed a waste to go to college. In fact, one coach at a very well known D1 school that was trying to recruit her encouraged her to turn pro. Generally speaking, at college age, boys are still physically maturing. Girls on the other hand have already pretty much done so. Some may go the college route because they need more "seasoning" and/or are not sure they either want to play professional golf or have the skills to do so, but want the free education. Then there are those who are ready to turn pro right out of high school.

And yes, part of it too is the money. Spending four years in college takes a way a lot of earnings potential for those ready to turn professional. On the PGA Tour that is not such a big issue as the purses are so large.

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#6 CTgolf

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:17 PM

View PostSean2, on 11 January 2018 - 09:32 AM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 11 January 2018 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

Almost seems like experiencing failure/challenges early (and maybe even often) is important to a junior's development path.

I think this is true in most endeavours... just ask Elon.

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

It made me wonder, if he had taken the conventional route that is popular among top amateurs now (go to college and play until dominant before trying to play professionally), whether he would have been more successful and on tour today.

This is a very interesting statement... seems like most boys go to college for at least a year but women are going pro much faster.  I don't know why it seems to be like that but one theory I've heard is that since the LPGA doesn't pay out as much as the PGA they have to get what they can when they can.

A good friend of mine's daughter went to the LPGA right out of high school. She is now beginning her 3rd season. Given her skill level at the time, it would have seemed a waste to go to college. In fact, one coach at a very well known D1 school that was trying to recruit her encouraged her to turn pro. Generally speaking, at college age, boys are still physically maturing. Girls on the other hand have already pretty much done so. Some may go the college route because they need more "seasoning" and/or are not sure they either want to play professional golf or have the skills to do so, but want the free education. Then there are those who are ready to turn pro right out of high school.

And yes, part of it too is the money. Spending four years in college takes a way a lot of earnings potential for those ready to turn professional. On the PGA Tour that is not such a big issue as the purses are so large.

I would agree on the physical maturity aspect for women

Also, there is potential child-bearing to consider and plan ahead for (so maybe front-load the career as much as possible beforehand)

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#7 Sean2

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Posted 11 January 2018 - 12:18 PM

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 12:17 PM, said:

View PostSean2, on 11 January 2018 - 09:32 AM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 11 January 2018 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

Almost seems like experiencing failure/challenges early (and maybe even often) is important to a junior's development path.

I think this is true in most endeavours... just ask Elon.

View PostCTgolf, on 11 January 2018 - 07:36 AM, said:

It made me wonder, if he had taken the conventional route that is popular among top amateurs now (go to college and play until dominant before trying to play professionally), whether he would have been more successful and on tour today.

This is a very interesting statement... seems like most boys go to college for at least a year but women are going pro much faster.  I don't know why it seems to be like that but one theory I've heard is that since the LPGA doesn't pay out as much as the PGA they have to get what they can when they can.

A good friend of mine's daughter went to the LPGA right out of high school. She is now beginning her 3rd season. Given her skill level at the time, it would have seemed a waste to go to college. In fact, one coach at a very well known D1 school that was trying to recruit her encouraged her to turn pro. Generally speaking, at college age, boys are still physically maturing. Girls on the other hand have already pretty much done so. Some may go the college route because they need more "seasoning" and/or are not sure they either want to play professional golf or have the skills to do so, but want the free education. Then there are those who are ready to turn pro right out of high school.

And yes, part of it too is the money. Spending four years in college takes a way a lot of earnings potential for those ready to turn professional. On the PGA Tour that is not such a big issue as the purses are so large.

I would agree on the physical maturity aspect for women

Also, there is potential child-bearing to consider and plan ahead for (so maybe front-load the career as much as possible beforehand)

Good point.
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