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How many practice rounds?


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#1 tiger1873

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 10:57 AM

I am finding out a lot kids are playing practice rounds for local tournaments.  I can see the need for a few practice rounds for larger tournaments that you travel for  and actually mean something. I fail to understand why you would do practice rounds for younger kids in local tournaments?

Nothing is on the line other then bragging rights. But to pay $70 for 18 hole tournament and another $100 in green fees for a practice rounds before hand seems like it overkill for a local tournament that has no ranking anywhere.

These kids tend to score lower but I can't imagine this is sustainable as they get older and compete.


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#2 mackepa

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 11:31 AM

If i'm playing in a tournament at a course i've never played before im definitely playing a practice round. I rarely play well at a course I haven't seen before. I don't think that is a testament to my talent level or lack of talent. It's just hard to know where all the trouble is without playing a course beforehand.

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#3 Noles

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 12:10 PM

There is some truth to what you are saying about the result of the tournament not really meaning anything in the long run, but try telling that to some really competitive kids.  I know that what my son shoots in a tournament is a big deal to him.  No matter what level the tournament is.  If we can make it work, we will play at a course prior to a tournament.  Sometimes we can't or don't try to make it work so he has to learn to play a course blind.  Looking at it from another angle, it isn't always about that tournament.  You are teaching your child to be thorough, to be prepared, to think ahead.  That lesson is for golf and life.  You can teach him or her how to look at a course for the first time. How to find the right spots to be aggressive and when to play conservatively.  Lots of benefits aside from just performing better in that specific tournament.

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#4 tiger1873

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 12:36 PM

I am not talking about a major tournament here. I am talking about local courses that anyone who played tournaments play a couple of times a year and are generally lower end courses with tricked up layouts. This is for kids who play on the local PGA or US Kids local tour not something a college coach would actually ever see.

They also play them a couple of times a week before a tournament.  I estimate there spending $250-$300 a week between tournaments and practice rounds. This can really add up if you play every week.  This to me seems like a lot of money to play a low level tournament for kids under 12.


I understand being competitive but I rather travel and do much bigger tournaments less times a year then spend that kind money.  There is no way you can account for every shot on every course you ever play and if you need that your not going to be able to compete at a higher level. Many of the better Tournaments are at private venues so you may only get one practice round anyways if your lucky.

I tend think the best players practice shots and know what they can do so they can execute a round given the conditions on that day.The older kids that I have seen that really good could will still beat most kids even in playing a blind course.

Edited by tiger1873, 17 October 2017 - 12:46 PM.


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#5 Noles

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 12:42 PM

I'm not really sure what you are even asking at this point.  You seem to have already answered your own question.


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#6 mackepa

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 12:57 PM

Im not sure what you're asking either. Im certainly not a tour player but Im a solid player and I really never liked going into a course blind. Even if I played a course previously I still would like a practice round before an event. That way the layout is fresh and you can remove any guess work you may have.

A perfect example is I played in the same tournament 3 years in a row and each year the course was incredibly wet and the ball wouldn't go anywhere. The following year the course was dry as a bone and I hit a conservative tee ball on a short par 4 with a three wood that ended up being in the water through the fairway. In previous years i couldn't even reach the water with my driver. I got penalized for hitting what I thought was a perfect ball but I didn't possess the local knowledge that balls tend to run a long way in that particular fairway when it gets dry. A practice round would have saved me a stroke or two in that instance.

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#7 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:03 PM

Never played a practice round for a US Kids Local Tour Event.  SFPGA Prep tour one day events were bigger and played practice rounds.  One day qualifiers always played practice rounds.

Two Day tournaments, always play a practice round.  Pinehurst #9 Hole Number 6 Par 5.  On this particular hole you can't see the landing area.  If you don't play a practice round you wouldn't know that you shouldn't go Driver off the tee.  Best bet would be 3i or Hybrid.  Everything in the landing area with a driver slants left down a slope into a lateral hazard.  Even a perfect shot in the middle of the fairway would land in the hazard.  Had you not played the practice round you wouldn't know it.

I understand what you are saying.  6 US Kids Locals X $37.00 = $222.00.  Probably another $200.00 for practice rounds for them.  In my humble opinion, not worth it for a US Kids Local.

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#8 Noles

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:09 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 17 October 2017 - 12:36 PM, said:

I am not talking about a major tournament here. I am talking about local courses that anyone who played tournaments play a couple of times a year and are generally lower end courses with tricked up layouts. This is for kids who play on the local PGA or US Kids local tour not something a college coach would actually ever see.

They also play them a couple of times a week before a tournament.  I estimate there spending $250-$300 a week between tournaments and practice rounds. This can really add up if you play every week.  This to me seems like a lot of money to play a low level tournament for kids under 12.


I understand being competitive but I rather travel and do much bigger tournaments less times a year then spend that kind money.  There is no way you can account for every shot on every course you ever play and if you need that your not going to be able to compete at a higher level. Many of the better Tournaments are at private venues so you may only get one practice round anyways if your lucky.

I tend think the best players practice shots and know what they can do so they can execute a round given the conditions on that day.The older kids that I have seen that really good could will still beat most kids even in playing a blind course.
Let me pose it to you this way:  Do you see any reasons why one would play a practice round or benefits to playing a practice round that have nothing to do with the result in the upcoming tournament?

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#9 tiger1873

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 01:32 PM

View PostNoles, on 17 October 2017 - 01:09 PM, said:

Let me pose it to you this way:  Do you see any reasons why one would play a practice round or benefits to playing a practice round that have nothing to do with the result in the upcoming tournament?

I think a lot people may not have tournaments every week like they do around here. You can play every weekend on both days if your choose too and some people around here do.  I also see a lot kids burn out too from playing too many tournaments and taking them too serious.

I also see a lot kids who do not belong to clubs basically use the local tournament circuit to play rounds of golf. Outside of tournaments they never play. The way some kids hit warmup balls I wouldn't be surprised if they barely hit the range.

Then we have competitive kids who do not belong to clubs but will play every weekend and there the ones who play lots of practice rounds before every tournament.  They know the course in and out every week. These parents are probably paying more then joining a club. I also think they hurt there kids long term and doing so many tournaments like this will burn the kids out. The parents are usually very wealthy and will probably pay 15-20k a year for a kid anywhere from 8-12 to play golf.

I personally think to be a good golfer you need to practice as much as possible and unless you have a membership somewhere it is going to be tough and expensive.  


I agree with Heavy if they mean something then of course you should do a practice round but these tournaments do not mean anything and are not ranked anywhere.

Edited by tiger1873, 17 October 2017 - 01:34 PM.


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#10 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 02:15 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 17 October 2017 - 01:32 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 17 October 2017 - 01:09 PM, said:

Let me pose it to you this way:  Do you see any reasons why one would play a practice round or benefits to playing a practice round that have nothing to do with the result in the upcoming tournament?

I think a lot people may not have tournaments every week like they do around here. You can play every weekend on both days if your choose too and some people around here do.  I also see a lot kids burn out too from playing too many tournaments and taking them too serious.

I also see a lot kids who do not belong to clubs basically use the local tournament circuit to play rounds of golf. Outside of tournaments they never play. The way some kids hit warmup balls I wouldn't be surprised if they barely hit the range.

Then we have competitive kids who do not belong to clubs but will play every weekend and there the ones who play lots of practice rounds before every tournament.  They know the course in and out every week. These parents are probably paying more then joining a club. I also think they hurt there kids long term and doing so many tournaments like this will burn the kids out. The parents are usually very wealthy and will probably pay 15-20k a year for a kid anywhere from 8-12 to play golf.

I personally think to be a good golfer you need to practice as much as possible and unless you have a membership somewhere it is going to be tough and expensive.  


I agree with Heavy if they mean something then of course you should do a practice round but these tournaments do not mean anything and are not ranked anywhere.

Too many parents push their kids to play in too many events too early.  Playing US Kids locals is nothing more than playing recreational basketball, soccer, little league baseball.  

My opinion only...

7-11 year olds should be playing no more than 18 tournament rounds in a calendar year.  Honestly, that is probably too much.  More than that and you are setting them up for burnout.  

12-15 year olds should play no more than 12-15 two day tournaments in a year.  That is between 24 and 30 competitive rounds.

16-18 year olds should play 15-18 two day tournaments in a year.  

Put this into perspective.  A NCAA D1 golfer plays at most 30 competitive rounds of golf during the 9 month season.  That doesn’t include advancing into the NCAA tournament.

To be a good golfer under 12 it is about 3 things.  Playing , chipping, and putting.  Practicing a bunch of hours during the week is making the sport a job.  I have watched 100’s of juniors play tournament golf.  At the end of the day it always comes down to who putts the best.  You need to practice, but you can tell the kids who are the range rats and who has learned the game by playing and being on the course.

At the end of the day, it is those parents money and kids.  They can do with it as they please.  I don’t agree with it, but that is their decision.  Those are the parents trying to make their kids Tiger Woods tomorrow.  They are setting that kid up for failure, but that is again their decision.


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#11 tiger1873

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 03:40 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 02:15 PM, said:


Too many parents push their kids to play in too many events too early.  Playing US Kids locals is nothing more than playing recreational basketball, soccer, little league baseball.  

My opinion only...

7-11 year olds should be playing no more than 18 tournament rounds in a calendar year.  Honestly, that is probably too much.  More than that and you are setting them up for burnout.  

12-15 year olds should play no more than 12-15 two day tournaments in a year.  That is between 24 and 30 competitive rounds.

16-18 year olds should play 15-18 two day tournaments in a year.  

Put this into perspective.  A NCAA D1 golfer plays at most 30 competitive rounds of golf during the 9 month season.  That doesn’t include advancing into the NCAA tournament.

To be a good golfer under 12 it is about 3 things.  Playing , chipping, and putting.  Practicing a bunch of hours during the week is making the sport a job.  I have watched 100’s of juniors play tournament golf.  At the end of the day it always comes down to who putts the best.  You need to practice, but you can tell the kids who are the range rats and who has learned the game by playing and being on the course.

At the end of the day, it is those parents money and kids.  They can do with it as they please.  I don’t agree with it, but that is their decision.  Those are the parents trying to make their kids Tiger Woods tomorrow.  They are setting that kid up for failure, but that is again their decision.

I even think what your saying above is a pretty hectic schedule. I don't think I would want to do any more then that.  

When I first started putting my kids in tournaments it was hard to resist not putting them in tournaments every week. I was lucky I had a neighbor who told me to not worry about winning until there older then 12.  I don't care what anyone says kids under 12 are playing recreational golf. Let them go out and play and see what happens.

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#12 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 04:40 PM

If a kid plays 3 local tours, that is 18 tournament rounds right there.  We did 3 last hear and I pulled my hair out because I don’t like caddying.  Difference was that mine is a little older.  8 years old was his first season an he played a whopping 6 tournaments.  Played football and basketball when it was those seasons.  Kids need different sports.  I agree that 18 for a 7-10 year old is too much.  That is just a max limit on it.

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#13 CTgolf

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

Edited by CTgolf, 17 October 2017 - 05:29 PM.


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#14 Noles

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 05:39 PM

In the end you have to run your own race.  Do what you think is best for your child and family.  There is no instruction manual.  You know your kid better than anyone.

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#15 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 05:40 PM

View PostCTgolf, on 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM, said:

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

It means absolutely nothing for a kid that hasn’t matured and reached puberty yet.


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#16 tiger1873

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 07:04 PM

View PostCTgolf, on 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM, said:

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

I can tell you that from experience the parents who require their kids at 10 years old to do a practice round in a low level tournament  are not the ones who let their kids just play.

To them every shot is a high stakes game.  If they were truly out to make the kid win they would age up when they start winning. These kids are the ones who will play the younger group right up until the last day even though the younger kids do not have a chance angainst them.

In the local us kids you have kids in the top 10 who will play every local to prove they can beat new kids who just took up the game.

I believe even tiger woods moved up to harder competition as soon as he could.  Playing tournaments should never be easy for them either they should have to compete and bring there game to win. I just do not see that fire in these kids.

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#17 Smarques33

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 10:00 PM

Our local tour has played the same general rotation depending on the season. After playing two full seasons my son has picked up some local knowledge of each course. I think this helps with confidence, even with courses he has had trouble with in the past. He can see his own development as he returns to each course. He plays against many of the same kids each week, some practice everyday and belong to high end private courses in the area. However, this year there have been a bunch of new kids as well. He used to ask questions about all the new players. This has helped me teach him  to just focus his attention on his game, what he can control. I also have practiced what I am preaching. I used to search the priority list when a new player popped up.

I am beginning to approach junior golf like I have with other sports my kids play. I don't worry to much about what everyone else is doing. I try to stay educated (this forum has helped), I try to develop the athletic skills they need. And wait (not so patiently) to see what puberty leaves them with.

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#18 Noles

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 08:00 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM, said:

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

It means absolutely nothing for a kid that hasn’t matured and reached puberty yet.
Just curious, what is the "it" in your reply?

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#19 darter79

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 08:40 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 02:15 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 17 October 2017 - 01:32 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 17 October 2017 - 01:09 PM, said:

Let me pose it to you this way:  Do you see any reasons why one would play a practice round or benefits to playing a practice round that have nothing to do with the result in the upcoming tournament?

I think a lot people may not have tournaments every week like they do around here. You can play every weekend on both days if your choose too and some people around here do.  I also see a lot kids burn out too from playing too many tournaments and taking them too serious.

I also see a lot kids who do not belong to clubs basically use the local tournament circuit to play rounds of golf. Outside of tournaments they never play. The way some kids hit warmup balls I wouldn't be surprised if they barely hit the range.

Then we have competitive kids who do not belong to clubs but will play every weekend and there the ones who play lots of practice rounds before every tournament.  They know the course in and out every week. These parents are probably paying more then joining a club. I also think they hurt there kids long term and doing so many tournaments like this will burn the kids out. The parents are usually very wealthy and will probably pay 15-20k a year for a kid anywhere from 8-12 to play golf.

I personally think to be a good golfer you need to practice as much as possible and unless you have a membership somewhere it is going to be tough and expensive.  


I agree with Heavy if they mean something then of course you should do a practice round but these tournaments do not mean anything and are not ranked anywhere.

Too many parents push their kids to play in too many events too early.  Playing US Kids locals is nothing more than playing recreational basketball, soccer, little league baseball.  

My opinion only...

7-11 year olds should be playing no more than 18 tournament rounds in a calendar year.  Honestly, that is probably too much.  More than that and you are setting them up for burnout.  

12-15 year olds should play no more than 12-15 two day tournaments in a year.  That is between 24 and 30 competitive rounds.

16-18 year olds should play 15-18 two day tournaments in a year.  

Put this into perspective.  A NCAA D1 golfer plays at most 30 competitive rounds of golf during the 9 month season.  That doesn’t include advancing into the NCAA tournament.

To be a good golfer under 12 it is about 3 things.  Playing , chipping, and putting.  Practicing a bunch of hours during the week is making the sport a job.  I have watched 100’s of juniors play tournament golf.  At the end of the day it always comes down to who putts the best.  You need to practice, but you can tell the kids who are the range rats and who has learned the game by playing and being on the course.

At the end of the day, it is those parents money and kids.  They can do with it as they please.  I don’t agree with it, but that is their decision.  Those are the parents trying to make their kids Tiger Woods tomorrow.  They are setting that kid up for failure, but that is again their decision.

My opinion the number of tourments a kids plays is irrevelant in terms of burnout.  To me its more about how much they are playing that sport.  I know kids on here who practacie/play 6 -7 days a week for hours. I belive I heard some of the top ranked jr littlerly get home schooled so they could play more.  That is a bit excessive and will lead to more burnout then playing 25 tourments a year and playing/practining once or twice a week. Most kids that burnout probally only play bc they are forced by parents to do something they don't trurly like or love. Any sport you do you have to have time off or you will get burned out.

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#20 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 12:04 PM

View PostNoles, on 18 October 2017 - 08:00 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM, said:

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

It means absolutely nothing for a kid that hasn’t matured and reached puberty yet.
Just curious, what is the "it" in your reply?

Winning and playing well does nothing at an early age to guarantee winning and a love for the game at an older age.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 19 October 2017 - 08:02 AM.


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#21 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 12:23 PM

View Postdarter79, on 18 October 2017 - 08:40 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 02:15 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 17 October 2017 - 01:32 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 17 October 2017 - 01:09 PM, said:

Let me pose it to you this way:  Do you see any reasons why one would play a practice round or benefits to playing a practice round that have nothing to do with the result in the upcoming tournament?

I think a lot people may not have tournaments every week like they do around here. You can play every weekend on both days if your choose too and some people around here do.  I also see a lot kids burn out too from playing too many tournaments and taking them too serious.

I also see a lot kids who do not belong to clubs basically use the local tournament circuit to play rounds of golf. Outside of tournaments they never play. The way some kids hit warmup balls I wouldn't be surprised if they barely hit the range.

Then we have competitive kids who do not belong to clubs but will play every weekend and there the ones who play lots of practice rounds before every tournament.  They know the course in and out every week. These parents are probably paying more then joining a club. I also think they hurt there kids long term and doing so many tournaments like this will burn the kids out. The parents are usually very wealthy and will probably pay 15-20k a year for a kid anywhere from 8-12 to play golf.

I personally think to be a good golfer you need to practice as much as possible and unless you have a membership somewhere it is going to be tough and expensive.  


I agree with Heavy if they mean something then of course you should do a practice round but these tournaments do not mean anything and are not ranked anywhere.

Too many parents push their kids to play in too many events too early.  Playing US Kids locals is nothing more than playing recreational basketball, soccer, little league baseball.  

My opinion only...

7-11 year olds should be playing no more than 18 tournament rounds in a calendar year.  Honestly, that is probably too much.  More than that and you are setting them up for burnout.  

12-15 year olds should play no more than 12-15 two day tournaments in a year.  That is between 24 and 30 competitive rounds.

16-18 year olds should play 15-18 two day tournaments in a year.  

Put this into perspective.  A NCAA D1 golfer plays at most 30 competitive rounds of golf during the 9 month season.  That doesn’t include advancing into the NCAA tournament.

To be a good golfer under 12 it is about 3 things.  Playing , chipping, and putting.  Practicing a bunch of hours during the week is making the sport a job.  I have watched 100’s of juniors play tournament golf.  At the end of the day it always comes down to who putts the best.  You need to practice, but you can tell the kids who are the range rats and who has learned the game by playing and being on the course.

At the end of the day, it is those parents money and kids.  They can do with it as they please.  I don’t agree with it, but that is their decision.  Those are the parents trying to make their kids Tiger Woods tomorrow.  They are setting that kid up for failure, but that is again their decision.

My opinion the number of tourments a kids plays is irrevelant in terms of burnout.  To me its more about how much they are playing that sport.  I know kids on here who practacie/play 6 -7 days a week for hours. I belive I heard some of the top ranked jr littlerly get home schooled so they could play more.  That is a bit excessive and will lead to more burnout then playing 25 tourments a year and playing/practining once or twice a week. Most kids that burnout probally only play bc they are forced by parents to do something they don't trurly like or love. Any sport you do you have to have time off or you will get burned out.

While what you are saying is true, as the kids get older it is not.  

As you get older, if your child continues in this sport, they will be playing in Multi-Day events.  Most of these events are two day events that happen on Saturday-Sunday.  If you are like most people, that means a majority of these events you will be traveling to on Friday morning and playing a practice round that afternoon.  You will stay in a hotel room Friday and Saturday night then leave late Sunday from the tournament to get home in the evening.  Where we live in Florida I would say we played in at least 10 of these a year with my daughter.  The mental drain of not sleeping in your own bed, traveling, missing school, and still expected to perform athletically as well as academically is draining.  In other sports, high school fills a big void and they do it for you in terms of showcasing.  In Golf, Tennis, Swim, you have to do it yourself.  If you are trying to earn a college scholarship, this is a lifestyle you have to adapt and come accustomed to in this sport.  There is no dodging it.  Most tournaments will not be in your backyard.  You will have parents playing their kids in 20-25 of these tournaments a year.  We set rules and guidelines to abide to with my daughter.  No more than one tournament a month in the school year.  No tournaments in back to back weeks.  No more than 15 multi-day tournaments in a calendar year.  The most she ever played was 14 multi-day events in a calendar year.  Her Senior Year of High School was 6.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 18 October 2017 - 01:23 PM.


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#22 Noles

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 01:47 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 12:04 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 18 October 2017 - 08:00 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM, said:

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

It means absolutely nothing for a kid that hasn’t matured and reached puberty yet.
Just curious, what is the "it" in your reply?

Winning and playing well does nothing at an early age to produce winning and a love for the game at an older age.
Attempting to say that everything is the same for every kid is just foolish.

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#23 CTgolf

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 02:09 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 12:04 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 18 October 2017 - 08:00 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM, said:

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

It means absolutely nothing for a kid that hasn’t matured and reached puberty yet.
Just curious, what is the "it" in your reply?

Winning and playing well does nothing at an early age to produce winning and a love for the game at an older age.

It's impossible to prove a counter-factual, but I would guess the probability of your statement being true is less than it being false.

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#24 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 02:22 PM

View PostNoles, on 18 October 2017 - 01:47 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 12:04 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 18 October 2017 - 08:00 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 17 October 2017 - 05:26 PM, said:

I think for some younger (let’s say <10yo) kids, playing well in a tournament can be a tremendous confidence boost and help develop a true love of the game and competitive spirit, so that they ultimately strive to be the best they can be (maximizing potential).

Not every child is naturally resilient, and some may initially get discouraged easily if they don’t play well.

If playing a practice round helps the child finish at or near the top it could be the difference between a kid going down a path to a successful (subjective and specific to each individual) junior golf ‘career’ and getting turned off (or at least not turned on) to the sport.

Some parents may know this about their children and are doing all they can to help them get the bug.

It means absolutely nothing for a kid that hasn’t matured and reached puberty yet.
Just curious, what is the "it" in your reply?

Winning and playing well does nothing at an early age to produce winning and a love for the game at an older age.
Attempting to say that everything is the same for every kid is just foolish.

LOL!!!!  You crack me up.

https://www.scienced...70723105832.htm

I guess they are foolish as well.  I can link several more of the same as there is article after article out there that states the same thing but even in more detail.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 18 October 2017 - 02:26 PM.


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#25 CTgolf

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 02:37 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 02:22 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 18 October 2017 - 01:47 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 12:04 PM, said:

View PostNoles, on 18 October 2017 - 08:00 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 17 October 2017 - 05:40 PM, said:

It means absolutely nothing for a kid that hasn’t matured and reached puberty yet.
Just curious, what is the "it" in your reply?

Winning and playing well does nothing at an early age to produce winning and a love for the game at an older age.
Attempting to say that everything is the same for every kid is just foolish.

LOL!!!!  You crack me up.

https://www.scienced...70723105832.htm

I guess they are foolish as well.  I can link several more of the same.

I couldn't read the full paper, but it appears that this article refers to specialization at an early age, and tries to find a causal link (or negative correlation) between early specialization and achievement, presuming that the 'average' professional and college athlete is more accomplished than the 'average' high school athlete.

That is not the same as proving that winning at an early age is not correlated to success at a later age.  Perhaps the kids winning at an early age are also the ones who specialize later too.

Additionally, it seems logical that the best athletes (who can play at the college or pro level) are the ones who would specialize the latest, because they are more likely to be good at many different sports and continue participation in more than one until they are 'forced' to choose.  If a kid is 'only average' athletically, she probably needs to specialize earlier if trying to compete with more 'naturally gifted' athletes.

I have read other similar articles and must say that I am not convinced that the 'science is settled' on this matter.

Edited by CTgolf, 18 October 2017 - 02:38 PM.


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#26 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 02:50 PM

https://www.forbes.c...r/#67c3d2e91fcd

Success and winning at an early age tells us nothing about talent.  I can go on and on.

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#27 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 02:51 PM

https://www.psycholo...blem-giftedness

The world is full of gifted failures.

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#28 leezer99

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 03:03 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 02:51 PM, said:

The world is full of gifted failures.

I'm still waiting for those kids labeled as "The Next Tiger Woods" or "Golf Prodigy" to pan out.

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#29 CTgolf

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 03:12 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 02:50 PM, said:

https://www.forbes.c...r/#67c3d2e91fcd

Success and winning at an early age tells us nothing about talent.  I can go on and on.

I am not arguing that a child winning at an early age guarantees success later.  At successively higher levels of competition there are fewer and fewer participants who ultimately 'make it'.

We are trying to understand whether winning at an early age increases the odds of winning at a later one (vs if the same child did not win early).  

If the probability of playing a Division 1 sport is only 5-10% among all high school athletes, we are trying to understand whether that probability is higher for kids who achieved success at an early age.  I would guess the probability would be significantly higher, but again there is no way to prove it because an individual child only lives one life (cannot do both 'winning early' and 'not winning early').

One exercise that would be instructive would be to calculate what % of current college and pro athletes achieved success (among those who participated) at an early age.  I have not seen any such study but I would guess that % would be very high relative to the overall population.

Such results would most likely demonstrate that, while winning early doesn't guarantee success, it may be an indication of higher probability of future success, and vice versa.

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#30 CTgolf

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Posted 18 October 2017 - 03:20 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 18 October 2017 - 02:22 PM, said:


LOL!!!!  You crack me up.

https://www.scienced...70723105832.htm

I guess they are foolish as well.  I can link several more of the same as there is article after article out there that states the same thing but even in more detail.

I also think it's fair to consider that not all sports are equal when trying to determine an age when one could accurately predict future success.

Certain sports are less dependent on brute physical force, which the article seems to stress in its citing a study of 'Track and Field' athletes (arguably the sport most dependent on 'innate' physical giftedness, which of course would only be known after complete maturation).

I would lump Golf into the pile of 'skill' sports that are less dependent on differing levels of maturation and sheer physicality (Track/Football/Basketball) that can change a junior athlete's trajectory dramatically.


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