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Playing D1 Golf Article


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#1 leezer99

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 02:20 PM

So this popped up today: http://www.golfwrx.c...on-i-mens-golf/

Pretty daunting when you start really digging into it.


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#2 heavy_hitter

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 03:04 PM

View Postleezer99, on 29 September 2017 - 02:20 PM, said:

So this popped up today: http://www.golfwrx.c...on-i-mens-golf/

Pretty daunting when you start really digging into it.

Very good article.  

I have said here, and tell other parents the best way to get a golf scholarship is through academics for males.  It didn't mention that there are only 4.5 scholarships for an 8-12 man roster.  If you have academics they can find you money and a spot on the team.  Put this into perspective, Brooks Koepka was a walk on at FSU.  They gave him money for books and that was it.

Bottom line, you have to be really special to make it to a D1 school.

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#3 heavy_hitter

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 04:07 PM

Will add one more thing.  What you do at the ages of 7-13 does not matter in the grand scope of things when trying to play golf at the next levels.  #1 in the World at 10 doesn't equate to even playing D1 golf.

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#4 CTgolf

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Posted 29 September 2017 - 08:45 PM

Top 600 to be seriously considered for D1?

Around #500 on AJGA rankings for class of 2018 averages mid to high 70s, and many around that level are low single digit index (not even scratch - saw some as high as 2-3).

The article makes it sound like playing for a lower tier D1 is easier than many might believe.

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#5 heavy_hitter

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 08:55 AM

View PostCTgolf, on 29 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

Top 600 to be seriously considered for D1?

Around #500 on AJGA rankings for class of 2018 averages mid to high 70s, and many around that level are low single digit index (not even scratch - saw some as high as 2-3).

The article makes it sound like playing for a lower tier D1 is easier than many might believe.

It is using Junior Golf Scoreboard rankings, not AJGA.  They are also not taking into consideration the difference in a scholarship player and a walk-on player.  4.5 scholarships for an 8-12 man roster.  Generally speaking, only the top6 guys are getting any scholarship money.  Just because you are on the team doesn't mean you get to play.  I took a quick peek at at the JGS signings.  Noticed a kid signed with Wofford and had a 10.3 scoring difference.  He will never play a match at Wofford.  He skews the average.  Many of those signees are not scholarship players.  You also have the lower schools with no budgets.  They recruit locally or in state only which are going to skew those averages.  When you look in depth, it is very hard.  We have a local kid in Florida that had a 1.48 scoring difference.  He is playing on a club team at one of the state schools so he can actually play.


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#6 tiger1873

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 01:23 PM

It is not just golf but any boys scholarships in any sport is hard to get. If you look at most schools they have large football teams and once you factor in in title IX it  is an issue getting a free ride since they need to have equal dollars for scholarships.

If your a girl this probably helps the golf scholarships since they use it balance out. Generally speaking getting a scholarship in sports for a girl is much much easier then boys.

Most of the boys I have known that got scholarships in both golf and other sports were more worried about going professional then college. I think it's the mindset of those that make it.

Edited by tiger1873, 30 September 2017 - 01:23 PM.


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#7 CTgolf

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 06:38 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 September 2017 - 08:55 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 29 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

Top 600 to be seriously considered for D1?

Around #500 on AJGA rankings for class of 2018 averages mid to high 70s, and many around that level are low single digit index (not even scratch - saw some as high as 2-3).

The article makes it sound like playing for a lower tier D1 is easier than many might believe.

It is using Junior Golf Scoreboard rankings, not AJGA.  They are also not taking into consideration the difference in a scholarship player and a walk-on player.  4.5 scholarships for an 8-12 man roster.  Generally speaking, only the top6 guys are getting any scholarship money.  Just because you are on the team doesn't mean you get to play.  I took a quick peek at at the JGS signings.  Noticed a kid signed with Wofford and had a 10.3 scoring difference.  He will never play a match at Wofford.  He skews the average.  Many of those signees are not scholarship players.  You also have the lower schools with no budgets.  They recruit locally or in state only which are going to skew those averages.  When you look in depth, it is very hard.  We have a local kid in Florida that had a 1.48 scoring difference.  He is playing on a club team at one of the state schools so he can actually play.

So I just looked and JGS rankings are indeed more complete, and it seems you need to be a bit more competitive to be top 600 (roughly scratch or so).

I agree that scholarship $ is only going to go to the most elite for sure, but many highly selective and prestigious D1 schools don't even give athletic scholarships, so that's not necessarily everyone's angle anyway.

I still think playing for less competitive D1 schools are not as out of reach as some might think.  Would acknowledge that a scratch index (only used as a way to benchmark skill level) is probably at least a cutoff, but I assumed everyone kind of expected that anyway.

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#8 heavy_hitter

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 07:03 AM

View PostCTgolf, on 01 October 2017 - 06:38 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 September 2017 - 08:55 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 29 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

Top 600 to be seriously considered for D1?

Around #500 on AJGA rankings for class of 2018 averages mid to high 70s, and many around that level are low single digit index (not even scratch - saw some as high as 2-3).

The article makes it sound like playing for a lower tier D1 is easier than many might believe.

It is using Junior Golf Scoreboard rankings, not AJGA.  They are also not taking into consideration the difference in a scholarship player and a walk-on player.  4.5 scholarships for an 8-12 man roster.  Generally speaking, only the top6 guys are getting any scholarship money.  Just because you are on the team doesn't mean you get to play.  I took a quick peek at at the JGS signings.  Noticed a kid signed with Wofford and had a 10.3 scoring difference.  He will never play a match at Wofford.  He skews the average.  Many of those signees are not scholarship players.  You also have the lower schools with no budgets.  They recruit locally or in state only which are going to skew those averages.  When you look in depth, it is very hard.  We have a local kid in Florida that had a 1.48 scoring difference.  He is playing on a club team at one of the state schools so he can actually play.

So I just looked and JGS rankings are indeed more complete, and it seems you need to be a bit more competitive to be top 600 (roughly scratch or so).

I agree that scholarship $ is only going to go to the most elite for sure, but many highly selective and prestigious D1 schools don't even give athletic scholarships, so that's not necessarily everyone's angle anyway.

I still think playing for less competitive D1 schools are not as out of reach as some might think.  Would acknowledge that a scratch index (only used as a way to benchmark skill level) is probably at least a cutoff, but I assumed everyone kind of expected that anyway.

I have a daughter that plays D1 golf.  I can assure you that college coaches do not care about handicap.

Ivy leagues is the only D1 conference that does not offer athletic scholarships.

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#9 CTgolf

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 07:14 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 October 2017 - 07:03 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 01 October 2017 - 06:38 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 September 2017 - 08:55 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 29 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

Top 600 to be seriously considered for D1?

Around #500 on AJGA rankings for class of 2018 averages mid to high 70s, and many around that level are low single digit index (not even scratch - saw some as high as 2-3).

The article makes it sound like playing for a lower tier D1 is easier than many might believe.

It is using Junior Golf Scoreboard rankings, not AJGA.  They are also not taking into consideration the difference in a scholarship player and a walk-on player.  4.5 scholarships for an 8-12 man roster.  Generally speaking, only the top6 guys are getting any scholarship money.  Just because you are on the team doesn't mean you get to play.  I took a quick peek at at the JGS signings.  Noticed a kid signed with Wofford and had a 10.3 scoring difference.  He will never play a match at Wofford.  He skews the average.  Many of those signees are not scholarship players.  You also have the lower schools with no budgets.  They recruit locally or in state only which are going to skew those averages.  When you look in depth, it is very hard.  We have a local kid in Florida that had a 1.48 scoring difference.  He is playing on a club team at one of the state schools so he can actually play.

So I just looked and JGS rankings are indeed more complete, and it seems you need to be a bit more competitive to be top 600 (roughly scratch or so).

I agree that scholarship $ is only going to go to the most elite for sure, but many highly selective and prestigious D1 schools don't even give athletic scholarships, so that's not necessarily everyone's angle anyway.

I still think playing for less competitive D1 schools are not as out of reach as some might think.  Would acknowledge that a scratch index (only used as a way to benchmark skill level) is probably at least a cutoff, but I assumed everyone kind of expected that anyway.

I have a daughter that plays D1 golf.  I can assure you that college coaches do not care about handicap.

Ivy leagues is the only D1 conference that does not offer athletic scholarships.

I think anyone who even casually reads these forums realizes handicaps are not relevant for recruiting, but there is simply no other way to compare skill levels from different geographical regions unless they are regularly competing in the same events, and it speaks to a general level of play when opining on topics like this.

Yes Ivy is what I'm referring to.  After all, only a small fraction of even D1 players will be playing golf in some capacity to earn a living.

Edited by CTgolf, 01 October 2017 - 07:15 AM.


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#10 heavy_hitter

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 09:03 AM

View PostCTgolf, on 01 October 2017 - 07:14 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 October 2017 - 07:03 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 01 October 2017 - 06:38 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 September 2017 - 08:55 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 29 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

Top 600 to be seriously considered for D1?

Around #500 on AJGA rankings for class of 2018 averages mid to high 70s, and many around that level are low single digit index (not even scratch - saw some as high as 2-3).

The article makes it sound like playing for a lower tier D1 is easier than many might believe.

It is using Junior Golf Scoreboard rankings, not AJGA.  They are also not taking into consideration the difference in a scholarship player and a walk-on player.  4.5 scholarships for an 8-12 man roster.  Generally speaking, only the top6 guys are getting any scholarship money.  Just because you are on the team doesn't mean you get to play.  I took a quick peek at at the JGS signings.  Noticed a kid signed with Wofford and had a 10.3 scoring difference.  He will never play a match at Wofford.  He skews the average.  Many of those signees are not scholarship players.  You also have the lower schools with no budgets.  They recruit locally or in state only which are going to skew those averages.  When you look in depth, it is very hard.  We have a local kid in Florida that had a 1.48 scoring difference.  He is playing on a club team at one of the state schools so he can actually play.

So I just looked and JGS rankings are indeed more complete, and it seems you need to be a bit more competitive to be top 600 (roughly scratch or so).

I agree that scholarship $ is only going to go to the most elite for sure, but many highly selective and prestigious D1 schools don't even give athletic scholarships, so that's not necessarily everyone's angle anyway.

I still think playing for less competitive D1 schools are not as out of reach as some might think.  Would acknowledge that a scratch index (only used as a way to benchmark skill level) is probably at least a cutoff, but I assumed everyone kind of expected that anyway.

I have a daughter that plays D1 golf.  I can assure you that college coaches do not care about handicap.

Ivy leagues is the only D1 conference that does not offer athletic scholarships.

I think anyone who even casually reads these forums realizes handicaps are not relevant for recruiting, but there is simply no other way to compare skill levels from different geographical regions unless they are regularly competing in the same events, and it speaks to a general level of play when opining on topics like this.

Yes Ivy is what I'm referring to.  After all, only a small fraction of even D1 players will be playing golf in some capacity to earn a living.

They look at scores in big events.  AJGA, North South, Bubba Conlee, USGA Qualifiers, Big Amateur Events at the State Regional and National Levels.  At the end of the day it comes down to a number related to par.  A handicap doesn't relate to par.

You get into an Ivy bases on Academic Merit alone.  Athletics is secondary.


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#11 CTgolf

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 10:01 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 October 2017 - 09:03 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 01 October 2017 - 07:14 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 October 2017 - 07:03 AM, said:

View PostCTgolf, on 01 October 2017 - 06:38 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 September 2017 - 08:55 AM, said:

It is using Junior Golf Scoreboard rankings, not AJGA.  They are also not taking into consideration the difference in a scholarship player and a walk-on player.  4.5 scholarships for an 8-12 man roster.  Generally speaking, only the top6 guys are getting any scholarship money.  Just because you are on the team doesn't mean you get to play.  I took a quick peek at at the JGS signings.  Noticed a kid signed with Wofford and had a 10.3 scoring difference.  He will never play a match at Wofford.  He skews the average.  Many of those signees are not scholarship players.  You also have the lower schools with no budgets.  They recruit locally or in state only which are going to skew those averages.  When you look in depth, it is very hard.  We have a local kid in Florida that had a 1.48 scoring difference.  He is playing on a club team at one of the state schools so he can actually play.

So I just looked and JGS rankings are indeed more complete, and it seems you need to be a bit more competitive to be top 600 (roughly scratch or so).

I agree that scholarship $ is only going to go to the most elite for sure, but many highly selective and prestigious D1 schools don't even give athletic scholarships, so that's not necessarily everyone's angle anyway.

I still think playing for less competitive D1 schools are not as out of reach as some might think.  Would acknowledge that a scratch index (only used as a way to benchmark skill level) is probably at least a cutoff, but I assumed everyone kind of expected that anyway.

I have a daughter that plays D1 golf.  I can assure you that college coaches do not care about handicap.

Ivy leagues is the only D1 conference that does not offer athletic scholarships.

I think anyone who even casually reads these forums realizes handicaps are not relevant for recruiting, but there is simply no other way to compare skill levels from different geographical regions unless they are regularly competing in the same events, and it speaks to a general level of play when opining on topics like this.

Yes Ivy is what I'm referring to.  After all, only a small fraction of even D1 players will be playing golf in some capacity to earn a living.

They look at scores in big events.  AJGA, North South, Bubba Conlee, USGA Qualifiers, Big Amateur Events at the State Regional and National Levels.  At the end of the day it comes down to a number related to par.  A handicap doesn't relate to par.

You get into an Ivy bases on Academic Merit alone.  Athletics is secondary.

I didn't say handicaps were important or relevant.  I merely mentioned them as a generally accepted measure of skill level.  Very few parents have a sense of what it takes to win or even be competitive in the 'big events' you mention above.  But they have a general sense of what a scratch golfer looks and plays like, and whether their child's game is anywhere close to that.

There are many Ivy golf recruits who are great golfers but merely very good, but not exceptional, students academically.  So if a great player meets the general academic admissions criteria for the school (which for Ivy League would be high) then they are probably getting in.  For many of these kids, being a starter and traveling with the team is a secondary concern to actually being admitted and receiving an education/degree from a top academic school.  I have even heard of a case where, after starting school her freshman year, a student immediately informed the coach that she had a change of heart (burned out) and will not be playing for the team even before the athletic season for her sport (not golf) began.  There was nothing the coach or the school could do about it.

There are few elite junior golfers (who have aspirations to play professionally) who decide to attend Ivy League schools or any other Division 1 (or 2 or 3) program that doesn't have a history of churning out pros, even if they are admitted.  These *less competitive* golf programs probably make up a majority of Division 1 teams.  The competition is not as strong, the tournaments played in not the best, the season is short due to geography, the facilities/resources not as impressive, etc.  So by definition, the talent level required to play at those schools is a notch below.  Plenty of opportunities at these schools for good, but not elite, players.

Edited by CTgolf, 01 October 2017 - 10:13 AM.


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#12 Noles

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 08:44 AM

With junior golf exploding since Tiger came on the scene and college golf becoming more prevalent, will the NCAA ever increase the number of scholarships allowed?  Or even expand participation in tourmaments?  I guess it's tough because you can only fit so many players on a course for tournaments but only bringing 5 players and maybe an individual or 2 seems like not enough.  Seems like it would benefit everyone if they increased the numbers.

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#13 heavy_hitter

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 09:19 AM

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 08:44 AM, said:

With junior golf exploding since Tiger came on the scene and college golf becoming more prevalent, will the NCAA ever increase the number of scholarships allowed?  Or even expand participation in tourmaments?  I guess it's tough because you can only fit so many players on a course for tournaments but only bringing 5 players and maybe an individual or 2 seems like not enough.  Seems like it would benefit everyone if they increased the numbers.

I don't ever see it happening.  The scholarships are in direct reflection of Title IX.  Men's golf will never have more than 4.5 IMO because it isn't a revenue maker for schools.  Sports like soccer and baseball would be more likely to see scholarship increases before golf.

The only way to increase numbers would be to limit the teams in the field.

The other thing you have to look at is that increasing scholarship limits would make the rich rich and the poor poorer.  As is right now, even though a D1 school has 4.5 scholarships, that school may not be fully funded for 4.5 scholarships.  You increase the fields and the scholarships and now kids that are great at a mid-major will be going to a FSU, UGA, G-Tech etc. etc.  Those power conferences that have the money will get stronger and the mid majors will get weaker, in my opinion.

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#14 Noles

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 10:05 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 08:44 AM, said:

With junior golf exploding since Tiger came on the scene and college golf becoming more prevalent, will the NCAA ever increase the number of scholarships allowed?  Or even expand participation in tourmaments?  I guess it's tough because you can only fit so many players on a course for tournaments but only bringing 5 players and maybe an individual or 2 seems like not enough.  Seems like it would benefit everyone if they increased the numbers.

I don't ever see it happening.  The scholarships are in direct reflection of Title IX.  Men's golf will never have more than 4.5 IMO because it isn't a revenue maker for schools.  Sports like soccer and baseball would be more likely to see scholarship increases before golf.

The only way to increase numbers would be to limit the teams in the field.

The other thing you have to look at is that increasing scholarship limits would make the rich rich and the poor poorer.  As is right now, even though a D1 school has 4.5 scholarships, that school may not be fully funded for 4.5 scholarships.  You increase the fields and the scholarships and now kids that are great at a mid-major will be going to a FSU, UGA, G-Tech etc. etc.  Those power conferences that have the money will get stronger and the mid majors will get weaker, in my opinion.
But those schools that choose not to would not be forced to give more that 4.5 so they can avoid any financial burden.  I don't see a negative to more scholarships being available.  Would be a huge benefit to those kids that receive them.

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#15 OffTheDole

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 10:13 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 29 September 2017 - 03:04 PM, said:

Put this into perspective, Brooks Koepka was a walk on at FSU.  They gave him money for books and that was it.

Billy Horschel also just got money for books his first couple of years at UF.


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#16 heavy_hitter

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 10:44 AM

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 10:05 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 08:44 AM, said:

With junior golf exploding since Tiger came on the scene and college golf becoming more prevalent, will the NCAA ever increase the number of scholarships allowed?  Or even expand participation in tourmaments?  I guess it's tough because you can only fit so many players on a course for tournaments but only bringing 5 players and maybe an individual or 2 seems like not enough.  Seems like it would benefit everyone if they increased the numbers.

I don't ever see it happening.  The scholarships are in direct reflection of Title IX.  Men's golf will never have more than 4.5 IMO because it isn't a revenue maker for schools.  Sports like soccer and baseball would be more likely to see scholarship increases before golf.

The only way to increase numbers would be to limit the teams in the field.

The other thing you have to look at is that increasing scholarship limits would make the rich rich and the poor poorer.  As is right now, even though a D1 school has 4.5 scholarships, that school may not be fully funded for 4.5 scholarships.  You increase the fields and the scholarships and now kids that are great at a mid-major will be going to a FSU, UGA, G-Tech etc. etc.  Those power conferences that have the money will get stronger and the mid majors will get weaker, in my opinion.
But those schools that choose not to would not be forced to give more that 4.5 so they can avoid any financial burden.  I don't see a negative to more scholarships being available.  Would be a huge benefit to those kids that receive them.

They aren't forced to give 4.5 now and many do not.  If you increase the scholarship limit then the Power Conferences it helps the power conferences with money.  They will be able to take more risks on kids that would normally be able to go elsewhere.   It will make smaller schools in smaller conferences non-existent as they won't be able to compete.

If you remember back in the 80's there were no scholarship limits in Football.  Notre Dame, Nebraska, Alabama, Oklahoma, FSU, Florida, Miami, all would have 150 kids on their rosters.  Universities could roster and give scholarships to as many kids as they could afford.  This stopped smaller schools like NC State, North Carolina, Houston, Duke, and the likes from being able to compete.   The NCAA changed the rule to 85 so that the smaller D1 with the understanding it would provide parity in the sport and it definitely did do that.

You change the scholarship amounts around in golf and the rich will only get richer.

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#17 Noles

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 12:09 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 10:44 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 10:05 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 08:44 AM, said:

With junior golf exploding since Tiger came on the scene and college golf becoming more prevalent, will the NCAA ever increase the number of scholarships allowed?  Or even expand participation in tourmaments?  I guess it's tough because you can only fit so many players on a course for tournaments but only bringing 5 players and maybe an individual or 2 seems like not enough.  Seems like it would benefit everyone if they increased the numbers.

I don't ever see it happening.  The scholarships are in direct reflection of Title IX.  Men's golf will never have more than 4.5 IMO because it isn't a revenue maker for schools.  Sports like soccer and baseball would be more likely to see scholarship increases before golf.

The only way to increase numbers would be to limit the teams in the field.

The other thing you have to look at is that increasing scholarship limits would make the rich rich and the poor poorer.  As is right now, even though a D1 school has 4.5 scholarships, that school may not be fully funded for 4.5 scholarships.  You increase the fields and the scholarships and now kids that are great at a mid-major will be going to a FSU, UGA, G-Tech etc. etc.  Those power conferences that have the money will get stronger and the mid majors will get weaker, in my opinion.
But those schools that choose not to would not be forced to give more that 4.5 so they can avoid any financial burden.  I don't see a negative to more scholarships being available.  Would be a huge benefit to those kids that receive them.

They aren't forced to give 4.5 now and many do not.  If you increase the scholarship limit then the Power Conferences it helps the power conferences with money.  They will be able to take more risks on kids that would normally be able to go elsewhere.   It will make smaller schools in smaller conferences non-existent as they won't be able to compete.

If you remember back in the 80's there were no scholarship limits in Football.  Notre Dame, Nebraska, Alabama, Oklahoma, FSU, Florida, Miami, all would have 150 kids on their rosters.  Universities could roster and give scholarships to as many kids as they could afford.  This stopped smaller schools like NC State, North Carolina, Houston, Duke, and the likes from being able to compete.   The NCAA changed the rule to 85 so that the smaller D1 with the understanding it would provide parity in the sport and it definitely did do that.

You change the scholarship amounts around in golf and the rich will only get richer.
I'm ok with all that if it means more kids get scholarships.

17

#18 heavy_hitter

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 12:26 PM

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 12:09 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 10:44 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 10:05 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 08:44 AM, said:

With junior golf exploding since Tiger came on the scene and college golf becoming more prevalent, will the NCAA ever increase the number of scholarships allowed?  Or even expand participation in tourmaments?  I guess it's tough because you can only fit so many players on a course for tournaments but only bringing 5 players and maybe an individual or 2 seems like not enough.  Seems like it would benefit everyone if they increased the numbers.

I don't ever see it happening.  The scholarships are in direct reflection of Title IX.  Men's golf will never have more than 4.5 IMO because it isn't a revenue maker for schools.  Sports like soccer and baseball would be more likely to see scholarship increases before golf.

The only way to increase numbers would be to limit the teams in the field.

The other thing you have to look at is that increasing scholarship limits would make the rich rich and the poor poorer.  As is right now, even though a D1 school has 4.5 scholarships, that school may not be fully funded for 4.5 scholarships.  You increase the fields and the scholarships and now kids that are great at a mid-major will be going to a FSU, UGA, G-Tech etc. etc.  Those power conferences that have the money will get stronger and the mid majors will get weaker, in my opinion.
But those schools that choose not to would not be forced to give more that 4.5 so they can avoid any financial burden.  I don't see a negative to more scholarships being available.  Would be a huge benefit to those kids that receive them.

They aren't forced to give 4.5 now and many do not.  If you increase the scholarship limit then the Power Conferences it helps the power conferences with money.  They will be able to take more risks on kids that would normally be able to go elsewhere.   It will make smaller schools in smaller conferences non-existent as they won't be able to compete.

If you remember back in the 80's there were no scholarship limits in Football.  Notre Dame, Nebraska, Alabama, Oklahoma, FSU, Florida, Miami, all would have 150 kids on their rosters.  Universities could roster and give scholarships to as many kids as they could afford.  This stopped smaller schools like NC State, North Carolina, Houston, Duke, and the likes from being able to compete.   The NCAA changed the rule to 85 so that the smaller D1 with the understanding it would provide parity in the sport and it definitely did do that.

You change the scholarship amounts around in golf and the rich will only get richer.
I'm ok with all that if it means more kids get scholarships.

You are still not understanding the full repercussions of the fall out if it would ever happen.  When the rich get rich there is no longer any reason for the smaller schools to keep dumping money into a sport at the collegiate level that they will not be very competitive at.  You would end up seeing more schools dump the sport than put money into it.  You would be just trading players for schools. Schools would justify dropping the sport to stay in compliance with Title IX.

My personal feelings, and I have a daughter that plays golf, is the Title IX has hurt male sports as much as it has helped female sports.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 02 October 2017 - 02:13 PM.


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#19 Noles

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 02:46 PM

It's not that I don't understand, I just disagree with you.

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#20 tiger1873

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 02:48 PM

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 12:09 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 10:44 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 10:05 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 02 October 2017 - 09:19 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 08:44 AM, said:

With junior golf exploding since Tiger came on the scene and college golf becoming more prevalent, will the NCAA ever increase the number of scholarships allowed?  Or even expand participation in tourmaments?  I guess it's tough because you can only fit so many players on a course for tournaments but only bringing 5 players and maybe an individual or 2 seems like not enough.  Seems like it would benefit everyone if they increased the numbers.

I don't ever see it happening.  The scholarships are in direct reflection of Title IX.  Men's golf will never have more than 4.5 IMO because it isn't a revenue maker for schools.  Sports like soccer and baseball would be more likely to see scholarship increases before golf.

The only way to increase numbers would be to limit the teams in the field.

The other thing you have to look at is that increasing scholarship limits would make the rich rich and the poor poorer.  As is right now, even though a D1 school has 4.5 scholarships, that school may not be fully funded for 4.5 scholarships.  You increase the fields and the scholarships and now kids that are great at a mid-major will be going to a FSU, UGA, G-Tech etc. etc.  Those power conferences that have the money will get stronger and the mid majors will get weaker, in my opinion.
But those schools that choose not to would not be forced to give more that 4.5 so they can avoid any financial burden.  I don't see a negative to more scholarships being available.  Would be a huge benefit to those kids that receive them.

They aren't forced to give 4.5 now and many do not.  If you increase the scholarship limit then the Power Conferences it helps the power conferences with money.  They will be able to take more risks on kids that would normally be able to go elsewhere.   It will make smaller schools in smaller conferences non-existent as they won't be able to compete.

If you remember back in the 80's there were no scholarship limits in Football.  Notre Dame, Nebraska, Alabama, Oklahoma, FSU, Florida, Miami, all would have 150 kids on their rosters.  Universities could roster and give scholarships to as many kids as they could afford.  This stopped smaller schools like NC State, North Carolina, Houston, Duke, and the likes from being able to compete.   The NCAA changed the rule to 85 so that the smaller D1 with the understanding it would provide parity in the sport and it definitely did do that.

You change the scholarship amounts around in golf and the rich will only get richer.
I'm ok with all that if it means more kids get scholarships.


They simply can't just give more scholarships.  I agree with heavy and that title ix has hurt the chances for boys in any sport.  Getting a D1 full ride for a boy is next to impossible in a lot sports nowdays. Boys are better off in general going after academics then sports. If you very good though of course you should try. Just don't expect one because you play well in high school.

Emliminating title ix though would most likely produce less golf scholarships for everybody including girls.  Think about how many people are willing to pay to watch college golf. Compare that to where people travel the county to follow college football games and you pretty much can see why something had to be done.

Edited by tiger1873, 02 October 2017 - 02:55 PM.


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#21 heavy_hitter

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 03:04 PM

View PostNoles, on 02 October 2017 - 02:46 PM, said:

It's not that I don't understand, I just disagree with you.

That is what makes America great.

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