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Unlocking the Great Golfer inside you????


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#1 2bGood

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 10:43 AM

I have to say I often think the allure of golf is that we can all (for the most part) hit one great shot. If we can do it once, then we have the ability to do it all the time. Right? As we progress we can be great for a hole, and then great for a round. I spend allot of time thinking about how we tap into that mental state that allows us to play well.

This has been a weird year for me. Golf has taken a backseat to other things in my life. My rounds are down by about 35% and I am not practicing at all. I have MAYBE hit 10 buckets all year. My pre-game routine has been reduced to hitting 10 putts and then swinging my drive 1 or 2 times in the air. :swoon:

The result is have played some of my best golf in a very long time and some of the worst. My handicap is way down but my average score is up. I have shot several rounds in the high 60's and several rounds in the low 80's.

But I really can not figure out if I will be Jekyll or Hyde on any given day. As best I can tell I play my best when I care about the results but I can remain detached about the consequences of the results. This is kind of a weird set of ideas particularly when I like to think I am a good course manager so I often consider where I can't miss.

My thoughts on this all are very fuzzy, so I would love some discussion on this.


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#2 juststeve

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 11:03 AM

My question would be do you have a firm idea what it is you are doing when you play well and aren't doing when you play poorly.  Your answer probably lies in finding that out.

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#3 Santiago Golf

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 11:39 AM

I think the biggest thing a good golfer (1.8 or less) can do to maximize their potential is too focus more on where my good shot is going to end up versus my miss will put me here. You can still shoot good scores playing defensive but overtime it can really take a toll on your game.

I hate the phrase you are only as good as your miss. I think golfers should always use their strengths as much as they can. Last year i was really good with my 6-8 iron. I would always hit my tee shot on par 4s to make sure i had one of those clubs in. I also knew my 70-30 game was really weak, so i made sure never to get these yardages.

Finally you must be confident over the ball. Anytime doubt slips in, step off the ball and start your routine over.
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#4 RRFireblade

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 12:39 PM

Well, here's my possibly weird prospective in it, it's pretty hard to explain...

I've always heard that golf is a game of consistency, always being able to do the same thing over and over. I've been a decent or better golfer my whole life, I've heard all the comments about having a 'pretty' swing or looking so effortless, whatever. It's all a myth, a facade.

Speaking for myself I can only say that it is not nor has it ever been that way. Despite what it typically looks like to spectators, the day to day struggle has most always been being able to get the same result regardless of what it feels like. If one is lucky, that same 'feel' will last for a few days or a week or maybe even a couple but over time, it's ultimately a constant game of chasing after it instead of having it.

The secret for me is to really understand my swing and my body and why things do what they do. I sweat every detail, even those....particularly those, that are invisible to anyone around me. I try to be aware of every subtly in the result and why, I alter my 'feel' to create a counter to that result and I do that "consistently", so there is that. Every so often, I will find a sweet spot in it all where those subtleties don't adversely affect the outcome. I range of miss-feeling or awkwardness that still works as intended. I don't ever question it. So then that becomes the new 'feel' and try as hard as I can to hold on to it. These are the glory days Lol, the days golf is a pleasure, the days when you go out there and attack the course with a vengeance.

These days are like a fine fruit and like a fine fruit, they will not last. Eventually, you take a bite and all the utter sweetness is still there but there is something, you can't quite place it, something ever so 'not quite right' that you just get a hint of. A sign that there may only be a short time left. You ignore it at first. Perhaps it was an anomaly, a fluke, something. But then you taste it again but now you can see there a slight discoloring to the fruit. Then you know. You now the ride is over and it's time to get back to work on the next harvest.

And then the chase starts all over again...
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#5 sb944

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 07:20 PM

Thanks RRF, that's very insightful.  I've seen this first hand too when I was a teenager, playing about half a dozen rounds with a scratch player on the same course.  He'd get the job done most days without anything spectacular in his game, then he'd suddenly be 25y longer and leaving me in awe.  He couldn't reproduce it every day, but when he could he tried to take full advantage of it.

Can you shed some light on some of those subtle changes you make to avoid big mistakes, I'd be very interested?  Did these come to you early in your golf development, or was it later/more recently that you tried to find the "fix it feels" to get you by day to day?


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#6 Petunia Sprinkle

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 07:34 PM

If we can do it once doesn't mean we have the ability to do it all the time. Even if we can do it twice, it's still a long way off. It only means we're capable of it. It's still big in that the possibility creates a real hope.

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#7 TB07

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 07:44 PM

with that thinking if you can hit an awful shot you can hit that every time, right? It's about how bad your misses are.

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#8 Pigems

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 07:53 PM

Great thread!! Great posts so far too, thanks for the insight and info guys. :)
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#9 Petunia Sprinkle

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Posted 11 September 2017 - 08:19 PM

View PostTB07, on 11 September 2017 - 07:44 PM, said:

with that thinking if you can hit an awful shot you can hit that every time, right? It's about how bad your misses are.

There are higher hopes for bad shots as sucking doesn't take skill and the variety is seemingly infinite.

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#10 TurnHard Langer

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 06:08 AM

If somebody can win the lottery once, they can win it every time.....wait what?


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#11 TurnHard Langer

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 06:11 AM

View PostRRFireblade, on 11 September 2017 - 12:39 PM, said:

Well, here's my possibly weird prospective in it, it's pretty hard to explain...

I've always heard that golf is a game of consistency, always being able to do the same thing over and over. I've been a decent or better golfer my whole life, I've heard all the comments about having a 'pretty' swing or looking so effortless, whatever. It's all a myth, a facade.

Speaking for myself I can only say that it is not nor has it ever been that way. Despite what it typically looks like to spectators, the day to day struggle has most always been being able to get the same result regardless of what it feels like. If one is lucky, that same 'feel' will last for a few days or a week or maybe even a couple but over time, it's ultimately a constant game of chasing after it instead of having it.

The secret for me is to really understand my swing and my body and why things do what they do. I sweat every detail, even those....particularly those, that are invisible to anyone around me. I try to be aware of every subtly in the result and why, I alter my 'feel' to create a counter to that result and I do that "consistently", so there is that. Every so often, I will find a sweet spot in it all where those subtleties don't adversely affect the outcome. I range of miss-feeling or awkwardness that still works as intended. I don't ever question it. So then that becomes the new 'feel' and try as hard as I can to hold on to it. These are the glory days Lol, the days golf is a pleasure, the days when you go out there and attack the course with a vengeance.

These days are like a fine fruit and like a fine fruit, they will not last. Eventually, you take a bite and all the utter sweetness is still there but there is something, you can't quite place it, something ever so 'not quite right' that you just get a hint of. A sign that there may only be a short time left. You ignore it at first. Perhaps it was an anomaly, a fluke, something. But then you taste it again but now you can see there a slight discoloring to the fruit. Then you know. You now the ride is over and it's time to get back to work on the next harvest.

And then the chase starts all over again...

How great would a documentary on all the thoughts and feels Vijay Singh has tried be.  Narrated by Vijay Singh....

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#12 RRFireblade

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:37 AM

View Postsb944, on 11 September 2017 - 07:20 PM, said:

Thanks RRF, that's very insightful.  I've seen this first hand too when I was a teenager, playing about half a dozen rounds with a scratch player on the same course.  He'd get the job done most days without anything spectacular in his game, then he'd suddenly be 25y longer and leaving me in awe.  He couldn't reproduce it every day, but when he could he tried to take full advantage of it.

Can you shed some light on some of those subtle changes you make to avoid big mistakes, I'd be very interested?  Did these come to you early in your golf development, or was it later/more recently that you tried to find the "fix it feels" to get you by day to day?

It happened when I was a teenager, 13/14/15-ish. At some point I became very aware of the face of the club, is the only way to explain it. It's sort of like learning to roller skate, you constantly fall, putting your feet down wrong and catching a wheel or worse...then one day you just get it. You develop an inherent knowledge of which way your feet are pointed and no matter what silly thing you try to do, you are now able to put the skate down pointed in the right direction so you no longer fall. It's was like that with the golf club and eventually paired with my swing. After that, direction and moving the ball becomes almost instinctive.

What I monitor on every swing is ball flight and impact. These are the only two things that matter in the whole game of golf. I feel for the slightest change or miss on impact and anything in the ball flight that was not precisely as intended. I will tell you however, that very very few swings are dead nuts on either or both of those but that's part of the constant chase. The key is knowing how and when to chase. Sometimes I just take a mental note because I know I put the best possible swing I could on that one, maybe I know what I did but got lucky and pulled it off so no adjustment until I know I'm losing the connection, sometimes I start to see a trend and make an adjustment. Depending on where I feel my game is, I may take a "that's good enough for today" stance or I know I got more than that. It really is a hard thing to explain but those are pretty close to my thought processes. I think the key is really knowing one's swing, one's tendencies and one's capabilities. these are things that can't be taught only learned after a lot....a lot....of time and practice.
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#13 jbw749

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 08:16 AM

View Post2bGood, on 11 September 2017 - 10:43 AM, said:

I have to say I often think the allure of golf is that we can all (for the most part) hit one great shot. If we can do it once, then we have the ability to do it all the time. Right? As we progress we can be great for a hole, and then great for a round. I spend allot of time thinking about how we tap into that mental state that allows us to play well.

This has been a weird year for me. Golf has taken a backseat to other things in my life. My rounds are down by about 35% and I am not practicing at all. I have MAYBE hit 10 buckets all year. My pre-game routine has been reduced to hitting 10 putts and then swinging my drive 1 or 2 times in the air. :swoon:

The result is have played some of my best golf in a very long time and some of the worst. My handicap is way down but my average score is up. I have shot several rounds in the high 60's and several rounds in the low 80's.

But I really can not figure out if I will be Jekyll or Hyde on any given day. As best I can tell I play my best when I care about the results but I can remain detached about the consequences of the results. This is kind of a weird set of ideas particularly when I like to think I am a good course manager so I often consider where I can't miss.

My thoughts on this all are very fuzzy, so I would love some discussion on this.
I defenently know the feeling you're talking about. It's like relaxed confidence.
Yes of course you care otherwise you wouldn't be out there.
Caring about playing the game and at the same time detaching the emotion involved with the outcome of the shot is basically the Holy Grail imo.

Now interestingly you say your rounds are down this year. Do you think there is any relation to the rounds being down and detaching some of the consequences of your shots? Meaning because you're not investing as much emotion, you do don't feel the need to get back out there as much?
For me I can always make time for golf if I really want to but my rounds are also down buy probably more than 30% and I think it's because I don't feel the need to feed my ego. Just some thoughts...


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#14 finleysg

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 08:44 AM

I've been thinking quite a bit about the idea in the OP: "care about the results but I can remain detached about the consequences". While I agree in general, I find, for myself, that there is a tendency to give in to bogey too easily. So is this being too detached?

For a good player, bogey is the easiest score there is. When I play competitive golf, I see good players grind so much more successfully than I do. Happened just yesterday. In my group of three, I was 3 shots worse than both of my FCs. After the round, one of the guys told me he was surprised at the score I posted (he was not my marker). He was sure I was one or two better than him.

Maybe it's a personality or character thing that is just about impossible to change? For me, anyway, leaking shots never goes away.

Edited by finleysg, 12 September 2017 - 08:45 AM.

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#15 BrianL99

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 09:14 AM

This thread is one of the more interesting ones I've read on here in a while.

RRFireblades comments were the most interesting, in that most of us guys who are shooting 77 on a good day, are thinking we're bums, because we shoot 91 on a bad day.  It's interesting to hear how someone who plays at the level RR does, seldom feels he has it going on for more than a short period.  

I guess it's like the old Tiger line about having his "A Game".   Guys that can really get it done, don't need their A Game to scrape it around a couple under par.

The one thing I'll add in response to the original post, was an experience I had last year with a friend of mine.  He's been a Teacher/Coach for some 30 years and has caddied for Nicklaus, Norman, Payne Stewart and many of the other greats.  

We were playing a course he'd never played and on one particular hole I mentioned to him, "whatever you do, don't lose it to the right".

He looked at me and in a very stern voice and said:  "Don't ever tell me where I shouldn't hit it, just tell me where I should hit it".

Edited by BrianL99, 12 September 2017 - 09:14 AM.


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#16 2bGood

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 09:33 AM

View Postjbw749, on 12 September 2017 - 08:16 AM, said:

View Post2bGood, on 11 September 2017 - 10:43 AM, said:

I have to say I often think the allure of golf is that we can all (for the most part) hit one great shot. If we can do it once, then we have the ability to do it all the time. Right? As we progress we can be great for a hole, and then great for a round. I spend allot of time thinking about how we tap into that mental state that allows us to play well.

This has been a weird year for me. Golf has taken a backseat to other things in my life. My rounds are down by about 35% and I am not practicing at all. I have MAYBE hit 10 buckets all year. My pre-game routine has been reduced to hitting 10 putts and then swinging my drive 1 or 2 times in the air. :swoon:

The result is have played some of my best golf in a very long time and some of the worst. My handicap is way down but my average score is up. I have shot several rounds in the high 60's and several rounds in the low 80's.

But I really can not figure out if I will be Jekyll or Hyde on any given day. As best I can tell I play my best when I care about the results but I can remain detached about the consequences of the results. This is kind of a weird set of ideas particularly when I like to think I am a good course manager so I often consider where I can't miss.

My thoughts on this all are very fuzzy, so I would love some discussion on this.
I defenently know the feeling you're talking about. It's like relaxed confidence.
Yes of course you care otherwise you wouldn't be out there.
Caring about playing the game and at the same time detaching the emotion involved with the outcome of the shot is basically the Holy Grail imo.

Now interestingly you say your rounds are down this year. Do you think there is any relation to the rounds being down and detaching some of the consequences of your shots? Meaning because you're not investing as much emotion, you do don't feel the need to get back out there as much?
For me I can always make time for golf if I really want to but my rounds are also down buy probably more than 30% and I think it's because I don't feel the need to feed my ego. Just some thoughts...

For sure my emotional investment is down this year. If I play good or play bad, I am going to walk off the course with about the same reaction, which is a positive one. But on the flip side with fewer rounds, each round has more value to me. I am not sure it the lack of rounds that correlates to the better golf, but I actually think in some ways it is less/no practice. I am not working on anything, I am not changing anything, I am just making the best of the game I have.

Maybe all of this has freed me up to play good golf? But there seems to be a razor-thin line between being free to play good golf and not focused enough causing bad golf.

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#17 jbw749

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 10:06 AM

View Post2bGood, on 12 September 2017 - 09:33 AM, said:

View Postjbw749, on 12 September 2017 - 08:16 AM, said:

View Post2bGood, on 11 September 2017 - 10:43 AM, said:

I have to say I often think the allure of golf is that we can all (for the most part) hit one great shot. If we can do it once, then we have the ability to do it all the time. Right? As we progress we can be great for a hole, and then great for a round. I spend allot of time thinking about how we tap into that mental state that allows us to play well.

This has been a weird year for me. Golf has taken a backseat to other things in my life. My rounds are down by about 35% and I am not practicing at all. I have MAYBE hit 10 buckets all year. My pre-game routine has been reduced to hitting 10 putts and then swinging my drive 1 or 2 times in the air. :swoon:

The result is have played some of my best golf in a very long time and some of the worst. My handicap is way down but my average score is up. I have shot several rounds in the high 60's and several rounds in the low 80's.

But I really can not figure out if I will be Jekyll or Hyde on any given day. As best I can tell I play my best when I care about the results but I can remain detached about the consequences of the results. This is kind of a weird set of ideas particularly when I like to think I am a good course manager so I often consider where I can't miss.

My thoughts on this all are very fuzzy, so I would love some discussion on this.
I defenently know the feeling you're talking about. It's like relaxed confidence.
Yes of course you care otherwise you wouldn't be out there.
Caring about playing the game and at the same time detaching the emotion involved with the outcome of the shot is basically the Holy Grail imo.

Now interestingly you say your rounds are down this year. Do you think there is any relation to the rounds being down and detaching some of the consequences of your shots? Meaning because you're not investing as much emotion, you do don't feel the need to get back out there as much?
For me I can always make time for golf if I really want to but my rounds are also down buy probably more than 30% and I think it's because I don't feel the need to feed my ego. Just some thoughts...

For sure my emotional investment is down this year. If I play good or play bad, I am going to walk off the course with about the same reaction, which is a positive one. But on the flip side with fewer rounds, each round has more value to me. I am not sure it the lack of rounds that correlates to the better golf, but I actually think in some ways it is less/no practice. I am not working on anything, I am not changing anything, I am just making the best of the game I have.

Maybe all of this has freed me up to play good golf? But there seems to be a razor-thin line between being free to play good golf and not focused enough causing bad golf.

Well if you're aware of your state of mind then you are working on something. Just the awareness alone might be enough to keep you shooting good scores with very little practice.


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#18 Jasonic

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 12:23 PM

This thread is basically "the inner game of golf" book.  Has transformed my game by letting go of negative thoughts and letting the subconscious control the swing. Relaxed confidence as someone said is one of the prime facets of it as is focused awareness. Highly recommend the book.

Edited by Jasonic, 12 September 2017 - 12:24 PM.

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#19 sb944

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 05:29 PM

View Postfinleysg, on 12 September 2017 - 08:44 AM, said:

I've been thinking quite a bit about the idea in the OP: "care about the results but I can remain detached about the consequences". While I agree in general, I find, for myself, that there is a tendency to give in to bogey too easily. So is this being too detached?

For a good player, bogey is the easiest score there is. When I play competitive golf, I see good players grind so much more successfully than I do. Happened just yesterday. In my group of three, I was 3 shots worse than both of my FCs. After the round, one of the guys told me he was surprised at the score I posted (he was not my marker). He was sure I was one or two better than him.

Maybe it's a personality or character thing that is just about impossible to change? For me, anyway, leaking shots never goes away.

Great point, I've had this in the past, chasing an emotionless feeling to results that I can't fully control.  It works, but I don't think it's healthy.  It's not a person I wanted to be in the end, because the training was so good I'd start to apply the same emotionless logic to my work, family, social, etc.  I think it's healthy to own some emotion after a result, what you have to be able to do is detach that emotion again before the next shot.

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#20 2bGood

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 07:04 PM

Lots of interesting points so far. If you can't tell, I am one of those "golf is more than golf" kind of guys and buy into the zen/metaphysical aspects of the game. I am a huge 'Golf in the Kingdom' fan.

I truly believe with the right mental state you can go out and shock yourself with how well you play. I believe it, as I have been lucky to do it more than a few times. Unfortunately, though I have experienced it, I can seem to make it happen at will.

Edited by 2bGood, 12 September 2017 - 09:48 PM.


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#21 Petunia Sprinkle

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 08:45 PM

 2bGood, on 12 September 2017 - 07:04 PM, said:

Lots of interesting points so far. If you can tell I am one of those "golf is more than golf" kind of guys and buy into the zen/metaphysical aspects of the game. I am a huge Golf in Kingdom fan.

I truly believe with the right mental state you can go out and shock yourself with how well you play. I believe it, as I have been lucky to do it more than a few times. Unfortunately, though I have experienced it, I can seem to make it happen at will.

When I was in the Opera Dept. at Boston University, our Stage Movement teacher asked about what books we read. One singer, of modest ability, said she read a lot of books on Zen. It left me wondering, why tf would you need to read more than one book on Zen?

A friend of mine was big into the whole Zen thing, as well. She had haystacks in her backyard and, quite often, there would be people in the yard, dressed in ghis, practicing 'Zen Archery'. They seemed very 'still' and focused (they'd obviously been at it for quite a while), but they kept missing the ****in' target.

Suzuki once said, "before studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, and after studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, but while studying Zen, sometimes, men are mountains and mountains are men."

Hit 'me well!

Edited by Petunia Sprinkle, 12 September 2017 - 08:47 PM.


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#22 2bGood

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 09:56 PM

 Petunia Sprinkle, on 12 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

 2bGood, on 12 September 2017 - 07:04 PM, said:

Lots of interesting points so far. If you can tell I am one of those "golf is more than golf" kind of guys and buy into the zen/metaphysical aspects of the game. I am a huge Golf in Kingdom fan.

I truly believe with the right mental state you can go out and shock yourself with how well you play. I believe it, as I have been lucky to do it more than a few times. Unfortunately, though I have experienced it, I can seem to make it happen at will.

When I was in the Opera Dept. at Boston University, our Stage Movement teacher asked about what books we read. One singer, of modest ability, said she read a lot of books on Zen. It left me wondering, why tf would you need to read more than one book on Zen?

A friend of mine was big into the whole Zen thing, as well. She had haystacks in her backyard and, quite often, there would be people in the yard, dressed in ghis, practicing 'Zen Archery'. They seemed very 'still' and focused (they'd obviously been at it for quite a while), but they kept missing the ****in' target.

Suzuki once said, "before studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, and after studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, but while studying Zen, sometimes, men are mountains and mountains are men."

Hit 'me well!

To be honest, I am not specifically into Zen or Metaphysical golf, more just ideas of tapping into 'another place' mentally.

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#23 Petunia Sprinkle

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:39 PM

 2bGood, on 12 September 2017 - 09:56 PM, said:

 Petunia Sprinkle, on 12 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

 2bGood, on 12 September 2017 - 07:04 PM, said:

Lots of interesting points so far. If you can tell I am one of those "golf is more than golf" kind of guys and buy into the zen/metaphysical aspects of the game. I am a huge Golf in Kingdom fan.

I truly believe with the right mental state you can go out and shock yourself with how well you play. I believe it, as I have been lucky to do it more than a few times. Unfortunately, though I have experienced it, I can seem to make it happen at will.

When I was in the Opera Dept. at Boston University, our Stage Movement teacher asked about what books we read. One singer, of modest ability, said she read a lot of books on Zen. It left me wondering, why tf would you need to read more than one book on Zen?

A friend of mine was big into the whole Zen thing, as well. She had haystacks in her backyard and, quite often, there would be people in the yard, dressed in ghis, practicing 'Zen Archery'. They seemed very 'still' and focused (they'd obviously been at it for quite a while), but they kept missing the ****in' target.

Suzuki once said, "before studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, and after studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, but while studying Zen, sometimes, men are mountains and mountains are men."

Hit 'me well!

To be honest, I am not specifically into Zen or Metaphysical golf, more just ideas of tapping into 'another place' mentally.

I actually meant all that metaphorically. The point is, being in 'another place', or 'state of stillness', or whatever, and playing golf well are two different things. They can overlap to the point where one interferes with the other, or where resolving issues with one may unburden the other, but they're generally separate with their own issues  and solutions.

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#24 2bGood

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Posted 12 September 2017 - 11:51 PM

 Petunia Sprinkle, on 12 September 2017 - 11:39 PM, said:

 2bGood, on 12 September 2017 - 09:56 PM, said:

 Petunia Sprinkle, on 12 September 2017 - 08:45 PM, said:

 2bGood, on 12 September 2017 - 07:04 PM, said:

Lots of interesting points so far. If you can tell I am one of those "golf is more than golf" kind of guys and buy into the zen/metaphysical aspects of the game. I am a huge Golf in Kingdom fan.

I truly believe with the right mental state you can go out and shock yourself with how well you play. I believe it, as I have been lucky to do it more than a few times. Unfortunately, though I have experienced it, I can seem to make it happen at will.

When I was in the Opera Dept. at Boston University, our Stage Movement teacher asked about what books we read. One singer, of modest ability, said she read a lot of books on Zen. It left me wondering, why tf would you need to read more than one book on Zen?

A friend of mine was big into the whole Zen thing, as well. She had haystacks in her backyard and, quite often, there would be people in the yard, dressed in ghis, practicing 'Zen Archery'. They seemed very 'still' and focused (they'd obviously been at it for quite a while), but they kept missing the ****in' target.

Suzuki once said, "before studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, and after studying Zen, men are men and mountains are mountains, but while studying Zen, sometimes, men are mountains and mountains are men."

Hit 'me well!

To be honest, I am not specifically into Zen or Metaphysical golf, more just ideas of tapping into 'another place' mentally.

I actually meant all that metaphorically. The point is, being in 'another place', or 'state of stillness', or whatever, and playing golf well are two different things. They can overlap to the point where one interferes with the other, or where resolving issues with one may unburden the other, but they're generally separate with their own issues  and solutions.

But you have been to 'that' place right? Where you have no doubts and the game becomes 'easy'. The other day I was ripping it (for me) I shot a nice little 68 like I was walking in the park- no stress it felt like I shoot in the 60's every day (I don't). At one point my opponent asked me if I planned to write a complaint letter to the USGA as the hole being so big must of took all the challenge out of golf. I am not sure if that was standard joke for him or if he somehow knew that I did indeed find the hole to be huge that day (along with the fairways and greens)

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#25 L29

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 12:22 AM

Never been able to do it for an entire round but I definitely have streaks in most rounds where standing on the tee box it just feels like I can do whatever I want to do and it works.  Usually there will be a couple longer putts every few rounds where I guess it just "fits my eye" and it just feels like it's going to go in standing over it, and then a lot of the time it does.  Sure wish I knew how to make those feels happen all the time or at least more often.  The one thing I'll say about those feels when they happen is that it almost seems like mechanics don't even matter that much at that time-it's just pure feel and I don't have to think about anything.

Edited by L29, 13 September 2017 - 12:23 AM.


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#26 jbw749

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 05:52 AM

 L29, on 13 September 2017 - 12:22 AM, said:

Never been able to do it for an entire round but I definitely have streaks in most rounds where standing on the tee box it just feels like I can do whatever I want to do and it works.  Usually there will be a couple longer putts every few rounds where I guess it just "fits my eye" and it just feels like it's going to go in standing over it, and then a lot of the time it does.  Sure wish I knew how to make those feels happen all the time or at least more often.  The one thing I'll say about those feels when they happen is that it almost seems like mechanics don't even matter that much at that time-it's just pure feel and I don't have to think about anything.
You can tap into it every day. It doesn't mean you're going to play much above your skill level (But you may) it means you can tap into your full potential on a regular basis. That is the mental side of golf.

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#27 ScratchyDawg

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 06:10 AM

I can't express more the importance a consistent preshot routine. If you don't do the same exact thing on every shot, then work on developing that now. It's the key to consistent scores once you get to the level you're at.
"Give up control to gain control" - George Knudson

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#28 oikos1

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 08:23 AM

"Push Yourself Through The a**#*^@ Of The Unknown"
                  
-Steve Elkington

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#29 PowderedToastMan

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 08:29 AM

Check out this book:
41je5owKLyL._SY346_.jpg
Professional golfer. Amateur human being.

In the bag:

A bunch of PING and a crapload of juice

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#30 Jasonic

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Posted 13 September 2017 - 10:00 AM

 PowderedToastMan, on 13 September 2017 - 08:29 AM, said:

Check out this book:
41je5owKLyL._SY346_.jpg

Are cutoff jeans allowed on the golf course??

Cobra f7+ 9.5*- Flowerband OG WB 73x
Cobra f7 3/4 wood - 14.5* - Flowerband OG WB 83x
Srixon u45 DI - 20* - Nippon Modus3 120x
Srixon z945 4-PW - Nippon Modus3 120x
Hogan TK wedges - 50*, 54*, 58* - Nippon Modus3 120x
TaylorMade Spider Limited Red
KSig or Snell MTB :)

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