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Golftec - Advice Needed!


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#1 MasonHAsher

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 05:06 PM

Has anyone been to golftec before? What has your experience been with them? How is the pricing? Looking to start taking lessons again and the other day I played in a tournament with one of their teachers and really liked the guy.

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#2 ayan

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:35 PM

Took lessons at GolfTEC for a long time. A big advantage is the practicing time that is included in the package, if you purchase it and I would recommend you do if you decide to go for it. Buckets of balls at the range do add up, and the video at GolfTEC is very helpful. At the end of the day, you need to determine if you bond with your coach before you sign up. Talk to him/her and see if you get a feeling that you will get what you're looking for.  In my experience, I got the feeling that they have somewhat of a corporate swing recipie that may or may not agree with you. I have heard others say the same, but there are those whose experiences have been different.  If you know of a non GolfTEC instructor that you like, the advantage in trying that first could be that you could give it a shot for a few lessons and reassess. At GolfTEC, once you purchase a package, you're committed. Also, instructors do move on and you could find yourself without the person you started off with halfway through your lesson package.
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#3 chadly643

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:39 PM

I've taken lessons regularly his summer at golftec. It's great if you're serious about improving. You buy lessons in packs and then devise a game plan for improvement. It allows your coach some advantages because he knows he's going to see you multiple times and can work on more complicated swing changes vs bandaids. Golftec on its own is nothing more special than any golf academy. It's all about finding a good teacher that can communicate well with you. I was fortunate to find that good teacher at a golftec in my city and he's helped my game a lot.

They are a well run business with a great sales model. It really all comes down to the individual teacher though.

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#4 scopek

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 09:44 AM

View Postayan, on 05 July 2017 - 10:35 PM, said:

Took lessons at GolfTEC for a long time. A big advantage is the practicing time that is included in the package, if you purchase it and I would recommend you do if you decide to go for it. Buckets of balls at the range do add up, and the video at GolfTEC is very helpful. At the end of the day, you need to determine if you bond with your coach before you sign up. Talk to him/her and see if you get a feeling that you will get what you're looking for.  In my experience, I got the feeling that they have somewhat of a corporate swing recipie that may or may not agree with you. I have heard others say the same, but there are those whose experiences have been different.  If you know of a non GolfTEC instructor that you like, the advantage in trying that first could be that you could give it a shot for a few lessons and reassess. At GolfTEC, once you purchase a package, you're committed. Also, instructors do move on and you could find yourself without the person you started off with halfway through your lesson package.

So what type of swing is it? I've heard that the founder is S&T trained?

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#5 Fireballer

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 10:07 AM

Has anyone ever done a driver fitting there?  Im a little skeptical that they just hand you your driver of choice abd they just move some weights around and play with the loft.


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#6 ayan

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 11:26 AM

View Postscopek, on 06 July 2017 - 09:44 AM, said:

View Postayan, on 05 July 2017 - 10:35 PM, said:

Took lessons at GolfTEC for a long time. A big advantage is the practicing time that is included in the package, if you purchase it and I would recommend you do if you decide to go for it. Buckets of balls at the range do add up, and the video at GolfTEC is very helpful. At the end of the day, you need to determine if you bond with your coach before you sign up. Talk to him/her and see if you get a feeling that you will get what you're looking for.  In my experience, I got the feeling that they have somewhat of a corporate swing recipie that may or may not agree with you. I have heard others say the same, but there are those whose experiences have been different.  If you know of a non GolfTEC instructor that you like, the advantage in trying that first could be that you could give it a shot for a few lessons and reassess. At GolfTEC, once you purchase a package, you're committed. Also, instructors do move on and you could find yourself without the person you started off with halfway through your lesson package.

So what type of swing is it? I've heard that the founder is S&T trained?

In my experience, there was emphasis on keeping a flat left wrist and having a deliberate hip slide and slinging the arms during the downswing.  Preferred shot shape was, as you can imagine from the previous sentence, a draw.  Don't know about S&T per se, at some point I was encouraged to try a reverse K set up, though.  Now, I don't believe there is anything wrong with any of that.  What I do think was decidedly counter productive for me was their religious use of "tour average metrics."  I spent a long time chasing numbers if my shoulder turn was not tilted enough, or my hip turn was too big, etc.  In doing so, some of the basic things got overlooked along the way.  For instance, I was encouraged to stay connected, to get the hands deep but no higher than right shoulder level at the top of the backswing, to have a 90 degree wrist set by P3, and a flat left wrist at the top of the backswing.  That resulted in there being a great deal of tension in my arms at the top of the backswing, which was a problem for me.  The simple reason for that was that my arms are just too long to do that in a relaxed manner, period.  Also, intuitively and early on, I had discovered -- through long hours at the practice bay -- that if I had a loop at the beginning of my transition, the downswing was much more effortless.  I was discouraged from doing that, the protocol was to have an on-plane backswing and downswing.

As you may have guessed, I felt I was being nudged in a direction in which my body was just not sold on.  I had a 12-month package which I was intent on finishing, not only because I had paid for it, but because I did enjoy the fact that they let me practice as much as I wanted.  When my time was up, I started taking lessons from a very good local instructor.  After a couple of swings, he pointed out that my arms were way too tense and suggested I loosen up my joints, that I needed to allow my arms to feel they disconnected from my torso at the top, and that I should get my hands as high as I possibly could at the top.  My concept of what a golf swing should be started to change at that moment.  Now, simply because I think I would have probably been better off not staying at Golftec as long as I did, I do know some Golftec instructors that are not tied to one particular pattern in their instruction.  I would suggest you try to find someone, at Golftec or elsewhere, that will be willing to work with you and customize his/her instruction to something that's going to work for you, and not force you to fit into a prescribed mold.

One thing I really dislike about the Golftec business model is that, irrespective of the quality of the instruction you receive there, the coaches are trained to be salesmen.  Some appear to be more uncomfortable with that notion than others, but it seems to the corporate culture.
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Hybrids - Adams New Idea 3H (19°) and 4H (22°) w/ Mitsubishi Bassara Eagle Series 65 Shaft
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#7 finleysg

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 12:10 PM

View PostFireballer, on 06 July 2017 - 10:07 AM, said:

Has anyone ever done a driver fitting there?  Im a little skeptical that they just hand you your driver of choice abd they just move some weights around and play with the loft.

I did. Hit so many different drivers I was completely worn out. Ended up taking 90 minutes. Still playing that driver 3 years later.

This is probably not the normal experience, unless you're also taking lessons from your fitter, which is what I was doing. My pro would almost always give me more time than I expected, in part, I think, because we just got along well.

Working with someone you know helps get right to the heart of the fitting. S/he knows your game, what you're working on, and what you're looking to gain (distance, trajectory, accuracy, etc). I don't think I would expect as much just setting up an appointment with some stranger.
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#8 jmkenn0

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 12:35 PM

I did it for about a year (on and off) - I think if its convenient for you, and you are really serious about getting better, the practice facilities are awesome, especially the ability to watch yourself on video instantaneously, and you live somewhere that its not feasible to practice outside all year round.  I don't remember any S&T, but they definitely want you to swing a certain way.

The one thing I wasn't thrilled with is they use a lot of props, for lack of a better word.  Good teaching devices, but stuff that you really need to be there to use (or buy and drag around a bunch of junk).  Great strategy for being "sticky" but I really wanted someone to tell me how its supposed to feel, not continually push my left a$$cheek against a bag (hip rotation instead of sliding, post around your left leg).

And I wasn't really using it to practice that much, so economically it didn't make sense.  I found an instructor who can communicate better with me, and he's making incremental improvements.

TLDR - try it, it might work for you?

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#9 chadly643

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 09:10 PM

View Postayan, on 06 July 2017 - 11:26 AM, said:

View Postscopek, on 06 July 2017 - 09:44 AM, said:

View Postayan, on 05 July 2017 - 10:35 PM, said:

Took lessons at GolfTEC for a long time. A big advantage is the practicing time that is included in the package, if you purchase it and I would recommend you do if you decide to go for it. Buckets of balls at the range do add up, and the video at GolfTEC is very helpful. At the end of the day, you need to determine if you bond with your coach before you sign up. Talk to him/her and see if you get a feeling that you will get what you're looking for.  In my experience, I got the feeling that they have somewhat of a corporate swing recipie that may or may not agree with you. I have heard others say the same, but there are those whose experiences have been different.  If you know of a non GolfTEC instructor that you like, the advantage in trying that first could be that you could give it a shot for a few lessons and reassess. At GolfTEC, once you purchase a package, you're committed. Also, instructors do move on and you could find yourself without the person you started off with halfway through your lesson package.

So what type of swing is it? I've heard that the founder is S&T trained?

In my experience, there was emphasis on keeping a flat left wrist and having a deliberate hip slide and slinging the arms during the downswing.  Preferred shot shape was, as you can imagine from the previous sentence, a draw.  Don't know about S&T per se, at some point I was encouraged to try a reverse K set up, though.  Now, I don't believe there is anything wrong with any of that.  What I do think was decidedly counter productive for me was their religious use of "tour average metrics."  I spent a long time chasing numbers if my shoulder turn was not tilted enough, or my hip turn was too big, etc.  In doing so, some of the basic things got overlooked along the way.  For instance, I was encouraged to stay connected, to get the hands deep but no higher than right shoulder level at the top of the backswing, to have a 90 degree wrist set by P3, and a flat left wrist at the top of the backswing.  That resulted in there being a great deal of tension in my arms at the top of the backswing, which was a problem for me.  The simple reason for that was that my arms are just too long to do that in a relaxed manner, period.  Also, intuitively and early on, I had discovered -- through long hours at the practice bay -- that if I had a loop at the beginning of my transition, the downswing was much more effortless.  I was discouraged from doing that, the protocol was to have an on-plane backswing and downswing.

As you may have guessed, I felt I was being nudged in a direction in which my body was just not sold on.  I had a 12-month package which I was intent on finishing, not only because I had paid for it, but because I did enjoy the fact that they let me practice as much as I wanted.  When my time was up, I started taking lessons from a very good local instructor.  After a couple of swings, he pointed out that my arms were way too tense and suggested I loosen up my joints, that I needed to allow my arms to feel they disconnected from my torso at the top, and that I should get my hands as high as I possibly could at the top.  My concept of what a golf swing should be started to change at that moment.  Now, simply because I think I would have probably been better off not staying at Golftec as long as I did, I do know some Golftec instructors that are not tied to one particular pattern in their instruction.  I would suggest you try to find someone, at Golftec or elsewhere, that will be willing to work with you and customize his/her instruction to something that's going to work for you, and not force you to fit into a prescribed mold.

One thing I really dislike about the Golftec business model is that, irrespective of the quality of the instruction you receive there, the coaches are trained to be salesmen.  Some appear to be more uncomfortable with that notion than others, but it seems to the corporate culture.

This is not my experience at all. We've been working on maintaining a cut shot that can never come over the top and miss left. My instructor is great and has certainly not tried to push me into a specific swing model. We have focused on the areas we identified from the beginning as the ones most important to meeting my goals.

The most impressive part of golftec to me was the initial approach. I filled out a questionnaire about my swing and my game and what my goals were. My instructor then watched me hit different shots and then we had a conversation about what it would take to reach my goals. We talked about focusing on wedge play and distance control. Then there was the sale and I thought it was well done. I'm in sales so I can appreciate their process. My experience was that they really are trying to come up with a plan that will help you reach your goals. I wasn't tricked into buying anything with corporate closing techniques, but had a legitimate conversation about what it might take in terms of instruction and practice to get to where I wanted to be.

Ultimately the most important part of all of this is finding an instructor you can relate to and who can communicate to you. Golftec on its own isn't going to do more for your game than any other instructor. I've been fortunate enough to find an instructor I like who has helped me play the best golf of my life. This guy happens to work at golftec.

One thing golftec won't do, and I think it's admirable, is give you one half hour lesson, a bandaid that doesn't really make you better, and take 50 bucks from you. They are a referral driven business that is in the game of truly helping golfers improve. Just like anywhere, there are instructors that you'll connect with and can learn from and others that aren't a fit.

Let us know how it works out for you.

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#10 MasonHAsher

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 11:47 PM

I have a swing evaluation scheduled for next Wednesday. I'll let you know how it goes. I really like the option of all the technology and he said that we can discuss pricing when I come in. Says he will be flexible for me since I play college golf and working at a few country clubs in the area. I won't be giving an answer the day of as to whether or not I want more lessons because I will want to sleep on it due to the amount of money.

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#11 MeikoKaji

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 02:09 AM

 MasonHAsher, on 06 July 2017 - 11:47 PM, said:

I have a swing evaluation scheduled for next Wednesday. I'll let you know how it goes. I really like the option of all the technology and he said that we can discuss pricing when I come in. Says he will be flexible for me since I play college golf and working at a few country clubs in the area. I won't be giving an answer the day of as to whether or not I want more lessons because I will want to sleep on it due to the amount of money.
sounds solid.  by coincidence, yesterday i spoke to a friend who's been going to golftec and he loves it.  money is not an object for him so he's focused on the content and instructor, both of which he's been impressed with.  the facilities, his instructor and how quickly he was able to improve.  so, in the last three months he's shot consistently in the low 80s and once in the 70s when he would normally shoot high 80s. his summary is that he is simply not losing balls anymore and has many more par and birdie chances because his short irons are much more consistent.  his shoulder turn was incredibly short before.

anyway, you're a low hdcp so maybe more difficult to find the thing to improve.  that is what is stopping me from going.  my numbers are within a club or a degree or two of the tour averages.  i know i could sway 1" less...i could be 10 years younger, etc...

so, curious how a low hdcp would do with them.  please report back your impressions.

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#12 Gamble Gamble

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 07:25 AM

IMO Their pricing is way too high for the quality of instructors they have.  I think I paid $2000 for 20 lessons.  I got marginally better.  For 2k you can get a top notch instructor for 20 hours instead and the don't need to fit you into cookie cutter lesson plans.  

You would be better suited to find a local pro who uses video in their lessons.
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#13 scopek

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 07:35 AM

 Gamble Gamble, on 07 July 2017 - 07:25 AM, said:

IMO Their pricing is way too high for the quality of instructors they have.  I think I paid $2000 for 20 lessons.  I got marginally better.  For 2k you can get a top notch instructor for 20 hours instead and the don't need to fit you into cookie cutter lesson plans.  

You would be better suited to find a local pro who uses video in their lessons.

It probably comes down to the quality of the instructor. But it seems intriguing and I've toyed with the idea of trying my local Golftec center. Having a swing protocol is a double edged sword. On the one hand, having the instructor be able to use metrics and a swing that is known to work prevents the random pro from going off the chain. On the other hand, the swing may not work for everyone and if the specific Golftec instructor doesn't have the teaching chops to modify their approach, then that could likely be counterproductive.

Edited by scopek, 07 July 2017 - 07:36 AM.


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#14 jmkenn0

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 08:57 AM

Also, part of the pricing is the use of the facilities.  $100/lesson is steep, but $100/lesson and unlimited indoor practice facilities is pretty reasonable.

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#15 Gamble Gamble

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 09:04 AM

 scopek, on 07 July 2017 - 07:35 AM, said:

 Gamble Gamble, on 07 July 2017 - 07:25 AM, said:

IMO Their pricing is way too high for the quality of instructors they have.  I think I paid $2000 for 20 lessons.  I got marginally better.  For 2k you can get a top notch instructor for 20 hours instead and the don't need to fit you into cookie cutter lesson plans.  

You would be better suited to find a local pro who uses video in their lessons.

It probably comes down to the quality of the instructor. But it seems intriguing and I've toyed with the idea of trying my local Golftec center. Having a swing protocol is a double edged sword. On the one hand, having the instructor be able to use metrics and a swing that is known to work prevents the random pro from going off the chain. On the other hand, the swing may not work for everyone and if the specific Golftec instructor doesn't have the teaching chops to modify their approach, then that could likely be counterproductive.

I had an excellent instructor until he had to leave midway through.  Because of their business model they are forced to become salespeople first and instructors second.  The guy I used at first quit and moved onto a country club because they put too much pressure into client acquisition.  He was an excellent player and a great teacher but the system and the pricing is the issue.  

As a company they charge a ton because of their extensive advertising but do not pay the instructors enough to retain their good instructors.

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#16 Orange Hog

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 09:28 AM

About 4-5 years ago I decided to get serious about playing golf and invested in a 6 month lesson package at GolfTec.  Once I did the initial swing evaluation I just bonded with the instructor.  He had a very direct teaching method that sunk in with me.  Whether GT works for you or not really hinges a lot on that instructor relationship.

I had a weekly lesson and was in the practice bay 2 to 3 times a week working on stuff, as well as working on drills at home every night.  Admittedly, I got worse before I got better, as it took some time for new swing mechanics to get ingrained.  But once they did I shaved 8 strokes off my handicap (dropped from a 20 to a 12).

Obviously it's not a magic bullet.  They have some nice tech with the camera/replay set up and a few other toys, but it really comes down to that instructor aspect and what you choose to invest in the form of practice.  It also really depends on what you are hoping to accomplish.  If you're a 2 handicap looking to get down to scratch or better then it may not be major swing issues that need to be addressed.  Be upfront in the swing evaluation and discuss your goals.

Hope it goes well, whatever you choose to do!
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#17 PuttingIsNotGolf

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 11:03 PM

It's a crapshoot. Sometimes you get that golden teacher. Other times you get someone who seems like they only studied the front page of golfwrx. At least not all the teachers are "PGA pros" so there's that...

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#18 MasonHAsher

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Posted 07 July 2017 - 11:10 PM

I text my old coach who quit giving lessons at the CC I work at. He is amazing so I may just start going to him again. We shall see. I am going to think about it for a few days.
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#19 Clambake

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 04:32 PM

I haven't done a lesson package with GolfTec, but did the swing evaluation and it was not a favorable experience.  To begin with, the instructor seemed pretty clueless. I was hooked up to his various gadgets, and he claimed it was showing my shoulders 30 degrees closed at address.  I could accept being a little closed, but 30 degrees seemed way excessive so I questioned it. The video clearly didn't show anything like that - it actually looked pretty square.  But he insisted that since that's what the computer said it had to be correct.  Not good when the instructor either doesn't trust his own eyes or just doesn't know better when the data clearly shows an instrumentation problem.  Strike one.

The other thing I didn't like was their basic strategy of using their data base of Tour pro swings which when averaged together they claim (or at least my instructor claimed) gave targets for all the various angles and positions they want the student to achieve. I see several things wrong with this strategy.  First, taking an average of these things together may not be an accurate approach.  Picture two players who are very different, let's say Kuchar and Dustin Johnson.  One has a very upright swing, while one is quite flat.  Averaging these together doesn't mean that the average is the proper position. It doesn't take into account different physiology of different people.  It also doesn't take into account the differences in age.  Sorry, but at age 59 I'm not going to be able to do the same things as a database of 20-30 year old Tour pros.  Again, maybe it was just my instructor, but it didn't seem like understanding my body characteristics and building the best swing for me was part of their strategy at all.  I'd ask the instructor questions along these lines and his answer was always "but we have this data base and it knows the best way to swing".   Strike two.

Then we came to the lesson plan. The recommended action plans came up to well over $3000, with about 3/4 for lessons and the remaining for practice sessions.  Looking at just the practice sessions, it looked like I was paying over $100 per 1/2 hour lesson session.  I don't have a problem with spending $3 grand to build a solid golf swing, but it seemed to me that a $200 per hour equivalent rate was excessive, especially since one can get top notch instruction in this area with highly rated coaches for around $150 an hour.  I couldn't help but think that taking 20 or so lessons from a top instructor, hitting outdoors, with someone who could understand what my body was capable of so we could build "my" swing, would be far more worthwhile.  Strike three.  

I walked out of there feeling like I had just been at a 90 minute timeshare pitch, but without the free toaster.

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#20 ayan

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 04:51 PM

 Clambake, on 11 July 2017 - 04:32 PM, said:

I haven't done a lesson package with GolfTec, but did the swing evaluation and it was not a favorable experience.  To begin with, the instructor seemed pretty clueless. I was hooked up to his various gadgets, and he claimed it was showing my shoulders 30 degrees closed at address.  I could accept being a little closed, but 30 degrees seemed way excessive so I questioned it. The video clearly didn't show anything like that - it actually looked pretty square.  But he insisted that since that's what the computer said it had to be correct.  Not good when the instructor either doesn't trust his own eyes or just doesn't know better when the data clearly shows an instrumentation problem.  Strike one.

The other thing I didn't like was their basic strategy of using their data base of Tour pro swings which when averaged together they claim (or at least my instructor claimed) gave targets for all the various angles and positions they want the student to achieve. I see several things wrong with this strategy.  First, taking an average of these things together may not be an accurate approach.  Picture two players who are very different, let's say Kuchar and Dustin Johnson.  One has a very upright swing, while one is quite flat.  Averaging these together doesn't mean that the average is the proper position. It doesn't take into account different physiology of different people.  It also doesn't take into account the differences in age.  Sorry, but at age 59 I'm not going to be able to do the same things as a database of 20-30 year old Tour pros.  Again, maybe it was just my instructor, but it didn't seem like understanding my body characteristics and building the best swing for me was part of their strategy at all.  I'd ask the instructor questions along these lines and his answer was always "but we have this data base and it knows the best way to swing".   Strike two.

Then we came to the lesson plan. The recommended action plans came up to well over $3000, with about 3/4 for lessons and the remaining for practice sessions.  Looking at just the practice sessions, it looked like I was paying over $100 per 1/2 hour lesson session.  I don't have a problem with spending $3 grand to build a solid golf swing, but it seemed to me that a $200 per hour equivalent rate was excessive, especially since one can get top notch instruction in this area with highly rated coaches for around $150 an hour.  I couldn't help but think that taking 20 or so lessons from a top instructor, hitting outdoors, with someone who could understand what my body was capable of so we could build "my" swing, would be far more worthwhile.  Strike three.  

I walked out of there feeling like I had just been at a 90 minute timeshare pitch, but without the free toaster.

In some ways, your impressions are very similar to my Golftec experience.  I too question/ed the benefit of chasing average values, especially if we're talking about body movements, and I agree with your math in terms of the cost of lessons.  I have to say, though, that being able to hit an unlimited number of balls pretty much any time I wanted was a pretty sweet deal.  Sometimes I would spend hours on end practicing, I was spoiled rotten.  But, also as you've said, for $150 an hour you can find great instructors here in LA too.

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#21 Gamble Gamble

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 05:47 PM

View PostClambake, on 11 July 2017 - 04:32 PM, said:

I haven't done a lesson package with GolfTec, but did the swing evaluation and it was not a favorable experience.  To begin with, the instructor seemed pretty clueless. I was hooked up to his various gadgets, and he claimed it was showing my shoulders 30 degrees closed at address.  I could accept being a little closed, but 30 degrees seemed way excessive so I questioned it. The video clearly didn't show anything like that - it actually looked pretty square.  But he insisted that since that's what the computer said it had to be correct.  Not good when the instructor either doesn't trust his own eyes or just doesn't know better when the data clearly shows an instrumentation problem.  Strike one.

The other thing I didn't like was their basic strategy of using their data base of Tour pro swings which when averaged together they claim (or at least my instructor claimed) gave targets for all the various angles and positions they want the student to achieve. I see several things wrong with this strategy.  First, taking an average of these things together may not be an accurate approach.  Picture two players who are very different, let's say Kuchar and Dustin Johnson.  One has a very upright swing, while one is quite flat.  Averaging these together doesn't mean that the average is the proper position. It doesn't take into account different physiology of different people.  It also doesn't take into account the differences in age.  Sorry, but at age 59 I'm not going to be able to do the same things as a database of 20-30 year old Tour pros.  Again, maybe it was just my instructor, but it didn't seem like understanding my body characteristics and building the best swing for me was part of their strategy at all.  I'd ask the instructor questions along these lines and his answer was always "but we have this data base and it knows the best way to swing".   Strike two.

Then we came to the lesson plan. The recommended action plans came up to well over $3000, with about 3/4 for lessons and the remaining for practice sessions.  Looking at just the practice sessions, it looked like I was paying over $100 per 1/2 hour lesson session.  I don't have a problem with spending $3 grand to build a solid golf swing, but it seemed to me that a $200 per hour equivalent rate was excessive, especially since one can get top notch instruction in this area with highly rated coaches for around $150 an hour.  I couldn't help but think that taking 20 or so lessons from a top instructor, hitting outdoors, with someone who could understand what my body was capable of so we could build "my" swing, would be far more worthwhile.  Strike three.  

I walked out of there feeling like I had just been at a 90 minute timeshare pitch, but without the free toaster.

That is almost exactly my experience too.  For $3000 i can get a 8 hour lesson package with a local pro and still afford a SkyTrak, net and hitting mat so i have my own personal indoor hitting bay.

Edited by Gamble Gamble, 11 July 2017 - 05:47 PM.

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#22 joker2

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 09:54 AM

Treat this like the search for any other professional. Seek out the pro, not the facility. If the recommended pro happens to work at golftec, so be it. If the pro happens to work at club "X" go there.
Just say'in...

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#23 smrtchar

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 07:03 PM

View PostGamble Gamble, on 11 July 2017 - 05:47 PM, said:

View PostClambake, on 11 July 2017 - 04:32 PM, said:

I haven't done a lesson package with GolfTec, but did the swing evaluation and it was not a favorable experience.  To begin with, the instructor seemed pretty clueless. I was hooked up to his various gadgets, and he claimed it was showing my shoulders 30 degrees closed at address.  I could accept being a little closed, but 30 degrees seemed way excessive so I questioned it. The video clearly didn't show anything like that - it actually looked pretty square.  But he insisted that since that's what the computer said it had to be correct.  Not good when the instructor either doesn't trust his own eyes or just doesn't know better when the data clearly shows an instrumentation problem.  Strike one.

The other thing I didn't like was their basic strategy of using their data base of Tour pro swings which when averaged together they claim (or at least my instructor claimed) gave targets for all the various angles and positions they want the student to achieve. I see several things wrong with this strategy.  First, taking an average of these things together may not be an accurate approach.  Picture two players who are very different, let's say Kuchar and Dustin Johnson.  One has a very upright swing, while one is quite flat.  Averaging these together doesn't mean that the average is the proper position. It doesn't take into account different physiology of different people.  It also doesn't take into account the differences in age.  Sorry, but at age 59 I'm not going to be able to do the same things as a database of 20-30 year old Tour pros.  Again, maybe it was just my instructor, but it didn't seem like understanding my body characteristics and building the best swing for me was part of their strategy at all.  I'd ask the instructor questions along these lines and his answer was always "but we have this data base and it knows the best way to swing".   Strike two.

Then we came to the lesson plan. The recommended action plans came up to well over $3000, with about 3/4 for lessons and the remaining for practice sessions.  Looking at just the practice sessions, it looked like I was paying over $100 per 1/2 hour lesson session.  I don't have a problem with spending $3 grand to build a solid golf swing, but it seemed to me that a $200 per hour equivalent rate was excessive, especially since one can get top notch instruction in this area with highly rated coaches for around $150 an hour.  I couldn't help but think that taking 20 or so lessons from a top instructor, hitting outdoors, with someone who could understand what my body was capable of so we could build "my" swing, would be far more worthwhile.  Strike three.  

I walked out of there feeling like I had just been at a 90 minute timeshare pitch, but without the free toaster.

That is almost exactly my experience too.  For $3000 i can get a 8 hour lesson package with a local pro and still afford a SkyTrak, net and hitting mat so i have my own personal indoor hitting bay.
I too would echo Clambake and would like to add a few other things to know if you decide to go through with Golftec:

- A big benefit is using the practice facility, but you can only book in 30min increments. My location had five bays but it was always busy which made it a challenge for me to even get 2-30min practices in per week based on my time availability. I've heard other locations are better though so look into this before.

- One thing I liked about Golftec was that the instructor will record notes and a swing video (before and after) on what you worked on that day. Unfortunately, they don't disclose that you can only see the 3 newest ones. Midway through my 20-lessons, I wanted to go back to an older video and they said it's gone. There is an option to download, which I found out later, so you can download each video after each lesson if you want to keep them. Also, their app sucks.

- I wouldn't recommend booking lessons once a week. I'd recommend once every 2 or even 3-weeks. The instructors at my location encouraged weekly lessons, but I felt that out of 20 lessons, 14 of them were supervised practice and not a lesson. Their input was that you want to practice right, which is true, but you also don't make a big change in one week.

- Last but not least, each instructor is different. While they do go by the "tour" numbers, they don't all have the same philosophy. So be sure to speak with them about their swing philosophy. The last instructor I took my last 3 lessons with had a philosophy closer to George Gankas and Dana Dahlquist whereas the first 17 lessons, the instructor wanted me to be like Adam Scott.

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#24 Scottyrocket

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 02:34 PM

View Postchadly643, on 06 July 2017 - 09:10 PM, said:

View Postayan, on 06 July 2017 - 11:26 AM, said:

View Postscopek, on 06 July 2017 - 09:44 AM, said:

View Postayan, on 05 July 2017 - 10:35 PM, said:

Took lessons at GolfTEC for a long time. A big advantage is the practicing time that is included in the package, if you purchase it and I would recommend you do if you decide to go for it. Buckets of balls at the range do add up, and the video at GolfTEC is very helpful. At the end of the day, you need to determine if you bond with your coach before you sign up. Talk to him/her and see if you get a feeling that you will get what you're looking for.  In my experience, I got the feeling that they have somewhat of a corporate swing recipie that may or may not agree with you. I have heard others say the same, but there are those whose experiences have been different.  If you know of a non GolfTEC instructor that you like, the advantage in trying that first could be that you could give it a shot for a few lessons and reassess. At GolfTEC, once you purchase a package, you're committed. Also, instructors do move on and you could find yourself without the person you started off with halfway through your lesson package.

So what type of swing is it? I've heard that the founder is S&T trained?

In my experience, there was emphasis on keeping a flat left wrist and having a deliberate hip slide and slinging the arms during the downswing.  Preferred shot shape was, as you can imagine from the previous sentence, a draw.  Don't know about S&T per se, at some point I was encouraged to try a reverse K set up, though.  Now, I don't believe there is anything wrong with any of that.  What I do think was decidedly counter productive for me was their religious use of "tour average metrics."  I spent a long time chasing numbers if my shoulder turn was not tilted enough, or my hip turn was too big, etc.  In doing so, some of the basic things got overlooked along the way.  For instance, I was encouraged to stay connected, to get the hands deep but no higher than right shoulder level at the top of the backswing, to have a 90 degree wrist set by P3, and a flat left wrist at the top of the backswing.  That resulted in there being a great deal of tension in my arms at the top of the backswing, which was a problem for me.  The simple reason for that was that my arms are just too long to do that in a relaxed manner, period.  Also, intuitively and early on, I had discovered -- through long hours at the practice bay -- that if I had a loop at the beginning of my transition, the downswing was much more effortless.  I was discouraged from doing that, the protocol was to have an on-plane backswing and downswing.

As you may have guessed, I felt I was being nudged in a direction in which my body was just not sold on.  I had a 12-month package which I was intent on finishing, not only because I had paid for it, but because I did enjoy the fact that they let me practice as much as I wanted.  When my time was up, I started taking lessons from a very good local instructor.  After a couple of swings, he pointed out that my arms were way too tense and suggested I loosen up my joints, that I needed to allow my arms to feel they disconnected from my torso at the top, and that I should get my hands as high as I possibly could at the top.  My concept of what a golf swing should be started to change at that moment.  Now, simply because I think I would have probably been better off not staying at Golftec as long as I did, I do know some Golftec instructors that are not tied to one particular pattern in their instruction.  I would suggest you try to find someone, at Golftec or elsewhere, that will be willing to work with you and customize his/her instruction to something that's going to work for you, and not force you to fit into a prescribed mold.

One thing I really dislike about the Golftec business model is that, irrespective of the quality of the instruction you receive there, the coaches are trained to be salesmen.  Some appear to be more uncomfortable with that notion than others, but it seems to the corporate culture.

This is not my experience at all. We've been working on maintaining a cut shot that can never come over the top and miss left. My instructor is great and has certainly not tried to push me into a specific swing model. We have focused on the areas we identified from the beginning as the ones most important to meeting my goals.

The most impressive part of golftec to me was the initial approach. I filled out a questionnaire about my swing and my game and what my goals were. My instructor then watched me hit different shots and then we had a conversation about what it would take to reach my goals. We talked about focusing on wedge play and distance control. Then there was the sale and I thought it was well done. I'm in sales so I can appreciate their process. My experience was that they really are trying to come up with a plan that will help you reach your goals. I wasn't tricked into buying anything with corporate closing techniques, but had a legitimate conversation about what it might take in terms of instruction and practice to get to where I wanted to be.

Ultimately the most important part of all of this is finding an instructor you can relate to and who can communicate to you. Golftec on its own isn't going to do more for your game than any other instructor. I've been fortunate enough to find an instructor I like who has helped me play the best golf of my life. This guy happens to work at golftec.

One thing golftec won't do, and I think it's admirable, is give you one half hour lesson, a bandaid that doesn't really make you better, and take 50 bucks from you. They are a referral driven business that is in the game of truly helping golfers improve. Just like anywhere, there are instructors that you'll connect with and can learn from and others that aren't a fit.

Let us know how it works out for you.

This was my experience. I am way over the top and wanted to hit more of a draw, which I have really never been able to do. I just like the shot shape of a draw in the air more than my current swipe at it. The instructor showed me one video of a pro and said that he wanted to give me a picture of an inside swing looks like. After that we never compared what I was doing to the pro. I had the feeling that the instructor did not have a cookie cutter/corporate theme going on and was going to work with me on what my limitations were and what I could reasonably accomplish. He also kinda made me own my plan by telling me I need to practice what I learned so that we can move on to more improvement in the next lesson. So far I think it's been pretty good.

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#25 Scottyrocket

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 02:38 PM

Also my cost was more than half of $3,000.


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#26 Reb58

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Posted 27 October 2017 - 04:45 PM

Older thread but Ill chime in since someone brought it back up.

I piad $1400 for a 12 lesson package. I stopped after 4. Stack and tilt was all they wanted to teach and Ive been playing 40+ years.  I just needed a few mods nit a total makeover of my game.

I did use their facilities for practice and liked the video and metrics but I couldnt live with a whole new way of swinging and trying to midel my swing after different pros.  Had i been younger, maybe but at my age refining what I do us better.

If I knew what I do now, Id have spent the money elsewherr

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#27 TexasGolfer91

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 12:22 PM

Had a decent experience there last year. Bought the 12 lesson package, and the practicing was convenient for winter. However, the lessons themselves were repetitive and IMHO, not worth how much they cost. They didn't tailor the instruction to my needs, just tried to revamp my swing to their "perfect PGA swing".

Probably wouldn't recommend it to a good friend, might recommend it to a colleague.
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#28 PJ1120

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 06:54 PM

I have a good friend that bought a package of lessons. They wanted him to do a lateral shift in the DS and keep the shoulders and hips closed to hit a push draw. For those that have taken lessons is that what your experience was?

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#29 puffdog

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 07:44 PM

Im four lessons in right now. I was gifted a five lesson package.

Ill echo everyone else here by saying the instructor makes the difference. During my swing eval, my pro told me exactly what Monte noticed when I sent him some video earlier this year. That helped me trust that the Golftec pro knew what he was talking about.

Since then, weve slowly worked on fixing the takeaway then creating more hip turn on the backswing. Currently focused on getting rid of my slide in the downswing but Ive already noticed more consistency overall with the changes weve made.

I recommend at least checking it out!

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#30 TexasGolfer91

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 12:08 PM

PJ1120, certainly my experience. That's what they taught me throughout my lessons. They want that push draw for everyone, which for someone like me just didn't ever seem like it was in the books.

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