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When To Start Lessons? (Kids)


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#1 swoosh21

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 01:41 PM

My little boy is about 2.5 years old right now and I'm thinking about putting him in lessons once he turns 3.  Has anyone done this with their kid(s) and was it successful?  He shows interest in it and hog up the bay at Top Golf.

Edited by swoosh21, 15 June 2017 - 01:48 PM.

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#2 SoloShot84

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 02:06 PM

I want to tag along with this thread since my boy just turned 1 yr. and wondering the same thing.

I am afraid though that Golf is one side motion which will not be really good for kids in development to start with.

in my opinion, I think I am going to wait till he turns mid teen before putting him into serious lessons. Until then, will be just occasional family picnic to practice range with couple swings to see if he really likes the game.
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#3 deathbymuffin

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 02:40 PM

Just take them out with you, let them observe how you go about things and generally let them learn the game on their own at their own pace.  Since there was no real pressure to perform and it was a fun way for him to spend time with me, my seven year old now likes golf.  Moving forward, I've signed him up for the first tee program and I'll allow the instructors there to teach him from a more technical perspective.

I just don't see how lessons could be good for a 3 year old.  Seems way too early for that, imo.

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#4 jasonfish11

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 02:44 PM

I have a 4 year old who has literally been swinging golf clubs since before he could walk.  He is barely able to control the smallest US Kids clubs right now and still prefers using his plastic clubs (he has some hard plastic ones which he can hit real balls with).  

I don't think getting lessons before 5 would provide any noticeable benefit.  

But you can spend time bringing him with you to the course or range (or TopGolf which my son loves).  And focus on some small things like #1 have fun #2 have fun #3 have fun #4 keep your hands together #5 have fun.

Edited by jasonfish11, 15 June 2017 - 02:45 PM.


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#5 Santiago Golf

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 03:47 PM

Ive had some 6 six year olds. Any lesson longer than 15-30 min becomes baby sitting.

It depends on the kid though. Lessons are normally making sure they have proper fundamentals, more of structured practice, and most importantly having fun

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#6 fawley

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 04:25 PM

View PostSantiago Golf, on 15 June 2017 - 03:47 PM, said:


It depends on the kid though.

This.

My son is 6.5, and just played his first season in the PGA Junior League for our club. He's a good athlete, he can be a pretty focused, intense little guy sometimes, and he loves to do well at whatever he's doing.

He and one other kid on the team were definitely ready to play. They paid attention at practice, they were pretty focused during the matches, they generally behaved well and enjoyed themselves.

A couple of the other 6 year olds on the team probably weren't really ready to play. They spent more time goofing off and only sporadically seemed interested in the golf. Which is fine. Different kids develop differently, and have different interests at different ages.

I got the impression from the pros at our club that the latter group of kids I wrote about were more common than the former at age 6.

Edited by fawley, 15 June 2017 - 04:26 PM.


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#7 Captain Bondo

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 06:00 PM

Every kid is different but I agree with the sentiment posted so far. My son is 4, he is vaguely interested - I take him to a pitch and putt that has a range and short game area, maybe once every few weeks, sometimes he will hang out for almost an hour, most of the time he's done after 15 minutes.

I give it a other 2 years before lessons are even a remote option for him. I agree with just taking him for very brief range sessions (get a small bucker and and be prepared to donate most of them to someone else) or short game practice area sessions.

In my case I will start to take him out later in the evenings for 9 holes with a cart, where he mostly just rides along, but can drop balls and hit them as he feels up to it. Once he's been on the course and has seen first hand the basic overall concept, if he wants lessons we'll go from there. I will probably try that next year (he'll be 5)

Edited by Captain Bondo, 15 June 2017 - 06:31 PM.


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#8 gsea33

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 06:13 PM

Seriously .......... 3yrs old, make sure u leave time in the day to prep for the MCATs

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#9 cinderellaboy

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 08:01 PM

My 5 year old is really into it and I've had him in large group lessons at my club which have added minimal value. Before 5, best thing I did was just have him hit balls in the garage with me.

This year I felt comfortable taking him out on the course and that has been awesome. They love the cart the snacks the whole thing. He knows he plays once we get to the green.

The best thing I ever did was buy the Yard Club by US kids. Before this year all I let him hit was that and a putter. It's the greatest training device ever for that age. Could not give a higher reccomdation it was a life changer. This year I bought him a 4 club set.

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#10 fawley

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 08:19 PM

One game I played with my son from age 4 or 5 was a chipping / putting game. He likes to compete, so we set a "handicap" for him which has come down over time.

We'd drop our balls a few yards from the putting green and pick a hole to hit to (the winner of the previous hole gets to pick). When we first started playing the game a couple of years ago, my son would get to hit his chip and then he'd get to take three putts trying to hole out.  Assuming he hadn't holed out, I'd get to chip after he'd hit his four shots, then we'd take turns hitting, with whoever holes out first winning the hole. First to win 9 holes wins the match.

A couple of years later at 6.5, he can be a pretty good chipper and putter when he gets on a streak. We're down to him hitting the ball twice, or on good days once before I get to hit, and our games are generally pretty competitive.  He loves to play the game, and I'm sure it's helped him in having a pretty good short game for his age.

Edited by fawley, 15 June 2017 - 08:19 PM.


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#11 PowderedToastMan

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 08:19 PM

I'm a pro and I haven't formally taught my kids yet (6 and 4). If they ask for help, I'll help, but I just let them have fun and figure it out for themselves for the most part. All I've done is shown them the grip, kept their head still on a couple swings, keep their feet on the ground, and tell them to hit the snot out of it. It's the Jack Grout method.
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#12 MonteScheinblum

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 08:33 PM

View Postjacksonalex, on 15 June 2017 - 08:19 PM, said:

I'm a pro and I haven't formally taught my kids yet (6 and 4). If they ask for help, I'll help, but I just let them have fun and figure it out for themselves for the most part. All I've done is shown them the grip, kept their head still on a couple swings, keep their feet on the ground, and tell them to hit the snot out of it. It's the Jack Grout method.

Agreed.

My kids are 8 and 7 and the most they get from me is hands closer, smash and try not to hit each other.

Unless there is an exceptional case, I don't give lessons to kids under 10.

OP, trust me on this, you're a minimum of 5 years away from wanting to take him for lessons.

He needs to learn his swing, not someone else's idea of a swing and getting too serious at a young age leads to burnout.
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#13 moadhia

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 10:57 PM

My 3 year old loves the driving range. He would rather be at the range everyday hitting balls than going to Chuck E. Cheese or whatever it is 3 year olds do. I just taught him the grip and let him have fun hitting balls. He gets to hit unlimited balls for 30 mins which is more than enough for him . It's important for kids to have fun with it and develop their own interests

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#14 jasonfish11

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 06:03 AM

Oh one more thing.  My kid loves trying to hit the guy in the cart.  At the first tee near my house they know kids like hitting the cart so they'll drive up close enough for him to hit them.  Same at top golf.

He usually gets excited and swings too early so I have to tell him "wait".  That might be close to the extent of the lessons I give (other than keep hands together).

It's funny as hell when he celebrates after hitting them.

Edited by jasonfish11, 16 June 2017 - 06:05 AM.


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#15 dornstar

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 09:31 AM

My boy just turned 7 and there's no way lessons would have worked at 3. Their attention span at that age as well as body control just aren't worth it. Get a club in his hand, teach some basics like how to hold it and stand, then have him hit the snot out of it. My boy is now starting to take it seriously, but I don't think there's anything a lesson could teach him at this point that I couldn't do myself. At this point, it's still just getting the setup and fundamentals right. I think the biggest thing I've done is teaching my kids a setup routine so they setup consistently. If not, they'll be all over the place with it.

Fortunately, I have a simulator in the garage and that has been the best purchase ever for my boy's game. He probably spends at least 30 minutes per day hitting balls and just getting reps is the best thing. He knows how to turn it on now and it's hilarious to come out here and see him hitting balls in his underwear. It's impossible to get that kid to wear any clothes. :D

Edited by dornstar, 16 June 2017 - 09:39 AM.

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#16 wkndhack

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 09:43 AM

My daughter is 4. No way she could do lessons. She will come to the range and whack balls or hit some putts on the practice green. If she continues to show interest, there are some junior group lessons nearby that she can start at 6 or 7.

My niece is 8 and in her second year of first tee program. She does well in group lessons. She goes to regular practice and plays on a club team, they play matches but the focus is more on instruction and getting comfortable on the course than actually playing to score. She will also play 9 holes with us, but you can tell she drifts out of focus at times.

Everything I have read and heard about junior golf is don't rush it and don't force it. Make sure they enjoy the game and they will be more likely to stick around and keep with it when they hit an age where they can really develop their skills.
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#17 Santiago Golf

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 09:52 AM

View Postjacksonalex, on 15 June 2017 - 08:19 PM, said:

I'm a pro and I haven't formally taught my kids yet (6 and 4). If they ask for help, I'll help, but I just let them have fun and figure it out for themselves for the most part. All I've done is shown them the grip, kept their head still on a couple swings, keep their feet on the ground, and tell them to hit the snot out of it. It's the Jack Grout method.

I think this is the most kids under the age of ten will get out of golf instruction. Keep feet on the ground, how to grip the club, and finish on your left side; and swing fast. And most importantly have fun.

I would also be caution having young kids playing rounds of golf (18 holes). A good structure for most kids would be
Under 4, 9 hole putting contest
Under 6, chip and putt
Under 8, 3-5 hole rounds
Under 10, 9 hole rounds

Then you really get them into 18 holes. Some kids will have the competitive attitude to play 18 holes and concentrate for 3-5 hours.
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#18 Hawkeye77

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 07:16 AM

View PostSantiago Golf, on 16 June 2017 - 09:52 AM, said:

View Postjacksonalex, on 15 June 2017 - 08:19 PM, said:

I'm a pro and I haven't formally taught my kids yet (6 and 4). If they ask for help, I'll help, but I just let them have fun and figure it out for themselves for the most part. All I've done is shown them the grip, kept their head still on a couple swings, keep their feet on the ground, and tell them to hit the snot out of it. It's the Jack Grout method.

I think this is the most kids under the age of ten will get out of golf instruction. Keep feet on the ground, how to grip the club, and finish on your left side; and swing fast. And most importantly have fun.

I would also be caution having young kids playing rounds of golf (18 holes). A good structure for most kids would be
Under 4, 9 hole putting contest
Under 6, chip and putt
Under 8, 3-5 hole rounds
Under 10, 9 hole rounds

Then you really get them into 18 holes. Some kids will have the competitive attitude to play 18 holes and concentrate for 3-5 hours.

Stick with the first paragraph.

The rest ...... 3 year olds may or may not want to have a 9 hole putting contest, might last only one even if they get it's a contest. Too much structure even in this set of guidelines. Let them have at it in those younger years. Fun junior stuff when they are ready, might be 5 might be 7, who knows. 10 year olds getting out there for 18 holes? Not the best idea in general.

Edited by Hawkeye77, 17 June 2017 - 07:17 AM.


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#19 ScratchyDawg

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 08:47 AM

Group lessons or camps are a good way to get younger kids into the game and make friends. I don't give individual lessons to kids under 8. Until then, just show them the basics and let them have fun.
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#20 RichieHunt

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 08:48 AM

I would probably wait.  Let him develop a little on his own and more importantly...see if he actually enjoys the game.  

The problem with the opposite approach of not getting a child involved in golf...if they enjoy it and you can afford to get them into the game....is if they want to play college golf the younger they get started the better.  U of Florida already has their 2020 team set.  So by the time they are 13 or so, kids are being recruited.  

It may be the furthest thing from your mind to have your child play college golf, but I wouldn't want to put my child in the position when they are 16 years old and having played golf for a few years and they are passionate about the game and very talented but can't get onto a college team because we waited so long to let him start playing a game that he had interest in as a toddler.

I would probably start them in lessons around 8 years old unless the kid is a complete natural that blows it past everybody his age.  It's not so much about getting instruction as it is about who the instructor is at that age.  Again,if he's passionate about the game I would try to find a local instructor that has a good reputation working with kids.  Hopefully he also has a good track record of developing kids into good juniors and college players, too.  

And it's not so much about step-by-step instruction as it is about giving the child direction.  Let the child kinda do their own thing, but try to keep them 'coloring between the lines.'  Furthermore, pretty much up until he's about 15 or so, he'll be better off spending more time on the golf course than the driving range.  Most parents think the opposite and the kids that almost always end up being the best are the ones that are out playing on the course more often lapping the kids that spend their time on the driving range.






RH


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#21 Hawkeye77

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 01:46 PM

View PostRichieHunt, on 17 June 2017 - 08:48 AM, said:

I would probably wait.  Let him develop a little on his own and more importantly...see if he actually enjoys the game.  

The problem with the opposite approach of not getting a child involved in golf...if they enjoy it and you can afford to get them into the game....is if they want to play college golf the younger they get started the better.  U of Florida already has their 2020 team set.  So by the time they are 13 or so, kids are being recruited.  

It may be the furthest thing from your mind to have your child play college golf, but I wouldn't want to put my child in the position when they are 16 years old and having played golf for a few years and they are passionate about the game and very talented but can't get onto a college team because we waited so long to let him start playing a game that he had interest in as a toddler.

I would probably start them in lessons around 8 years old unless the kid is a complete natural that blows it past everybody his age.  It's not so much about getting instruction as it is about who the instructor is at that age.  Again,if he's passionate about the game I would try to find a local instructor that has a good reputation working with kids.  Hopefully he also has a good track record of developing kids into good juniors and college players, too.  

And it's not so much about step-by-step instruction as it is about giving the child direction.  Let the child kinda do their own thing, but try to keep them 'coloring between the lines.'  Furthermore, pretty much up until he's about 15 or so, he'll be better off spending more time on the golf course than the driving range.  Most parents think the opposite and the kids that almost always end up being the best are the ones that are out playing on the course more often lapping the kids that spend their time on the driving range.







RH

For 2020-2021, they are still just under 2 1/2 years to being able to sign an early national letter of intent, aren't they? So things would be far from "set" in the world of college athletics these days? That 15 year old you think is guaranteed to play at Florida isn't guaranteed if he can't break 80 before signing his NLI or if someone else comes along that the college decides it wants more. May be missing something in the rules, etc., but it would seem to be far from set.

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#22 MrWolf

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 02:16 PM

View Postdeathbymuffin, on 15 June 2017 - 02:40 PM, said:

Just take them out with you, let them observe how you go about things and generally let them learn the game on their own at their own pace.  Since there was no real pressure to perform and it was a fun way for him to spend time with me, my seven year old now likes golf.  Moving forward, I've signed him up for the first tee program and I'll allow the instructors there to teach him from a more technical perspective.

I just don't see how lessons could be good for a 3 year old.  Seems way too early for that, imo.

Agree completely. Expose them to lots of golf. Make it as fun as possible for them. Don't try and correct their technique and just let them figure out how to hit the ball. Lessons can come later.
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#23 Andrew Bond of Glencoe

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 09:22 PM

My son just turned 9 and while he is naturally talented at the game - he has broken 40 for 9 holes and did so at the age of 7, he is very immature and doesn't have the patience for practicing.

I dialed back the actual golf and now we hit the range twice a month. Without a practice swing he can hit a beautiful draw with his driver. His irons however have suffered as his hands have dropped in his backswing and he sweeps a bit too much with his irons.

I am thinking about joining a country club and perhaps we could play more. What he really needs is a team.

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#24 RichieHunt

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 10:29 PM

View PostHawkeye77, on 17 June 2017 - 01:46 PM, said:

View PostRichieHunt, on 17 June 2017 - 08:48 AM, said:

I would probably wait.  Let him develop a little on his own and more importantly...see if he actually enjoys the game.  

The problem with the opposite approach of not getting a child involved in golf...if they enjoy it and you can afford to get them into the game....is if they want to play college golf the younger they get started the better.  U of Florida already has their 2020 team set.  So by the time they are 13 or so, kids are being recruited.  

It may be the furthest thing from your mind to have your child play college golf, but I wouldn't want to put my child in the position when they are 16 years old and having played golf for a few years and they are passionate about the game and very talented but can't get onto a college team because we waited so long to let him start playing a game that he had interest in as a toddler.

I would probably start them in lessons around 8 years old unless the kid is a complete natural that blows it past everybody his age.  It's not so much about getting instruction as it is about who the instructor is at that age.  Again,if he's passionate about the game I would try to find a local instructor that has a good reputation working with kids.  Hopefully he also has a good track record of developing kids into good juniors and college players, too.  

And it's not so much about step-by-step instruction as it is about giving the child direction.  Let the child kinda do their own thing, but try to keep them 'coloring between the lines.'  Furthermore, pretty much up until he's about 15 or so, he'll be better off spending more time on the golf course than the driving range.  Most parents think the opposite and the kids that almost always end up being the best are the ones that are out playing on the course more often lapping the kids that spend their time on the driving range.







RH

For 2020-2021, they are still just under 2 1/2 years to being able to sign an early national letter of intent, aren't they? So things would be far from "set" in the world of college athletics these days? That 15 year old you think is guaranteed to play at Florida isn't guaranteed if he can't break 80 before signing his NLI or if someone else comes along that the college decides it wants more. May be missing something in the rules, etc., but it would seem to be far from set.

About a month ago I played with one of the best juniors in the state of Florida and when I asked him what school he was going to he didn't name any Florida schools.  When I asked why he wasn't looking at Florida schools he told all of the big programs are all set and in fact that U of F in particular has their team set thru 2020.  From what I've been told by others, one of whom is a D1 coach for a small program...the bigger programs seriously recruit players starting at 13 years old.  My friend says that he basically tries to find diamonds in the rough with foreign players and the American players that slip thru the cracks.  

Nothing has been guaranteed in college golf for decades.  They can always promise scholarships and then tell you that they don't have a scholarship for you when you've signed to play for them.  But from everything I have heard is the top programs are looking hard at kids at 13 years old.  Of course, one could always be a late bloomer and find a small school to play for and then transfer to a bigger program.






RH

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#25 Hawkeye77

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 10:38 PM

View PostRichieHunt, on 17 June 2017 - 10:29 PM, said:

View PostHawkeye77, on 17 June 2017 - 01:46 PM, said:

View PostRichieHunt, on 17 June 2017 - 08:48 AM, said:

I would probably wait.  Let him develop a little on his own and more importantly...see if he actually enjoys the game.  

The problem with the opposite approach of not getting a child involved in golf...if they enjoy it and you can afford to get them into the game....is if they want to play college golf the younger they get started the better.  U of Florida already has their 2020 team set.  So by the time they are 13 or so, kids are being recruited.  

It may be the furthest thing from your mind to have your child play college golf, but I wouldn't want to put my child in the position when they are 16 years old and having played golf for a few years and they are passionate about the game and very talented but can't get onto a college team because we waited so long to let him start playing a game that he had interest in as a toddler.

I would probably start them in lessons around 8 years old unless the kid is a complete natural that blows it past everybody his age.  It's not so much about getting instruction as it is about who the instructor is at that age.  Again,if he's passionate about the game I would try to find a local instructor that has a good reputation working with kids.  Hopefully he also has a good track record of developing kids into good juniors and college players, too.  

And it's not so much about step-by-step instruction as it is about giving the child direction.  Let the child kinda do their own thing, but try to keep them 'coloring between the lines.'  Furthermore, pretty much up until he's about 15 or so, he'll be better off spending more time on the golf course than the driving range.  Most parents think the opposite and the kids that almost always end up being the best are the ones that are out playing on the course more often lapping the kids that spend their time on the driving range.







RH

For 2020-2021, they are still just under 2 1/2 years to being able to sign an early national letter of intent, aren't they? So things would be far from "set" in the world of college athletics these days? That 15 year old you think is guaranteed to play at Florida isn't guaranteed if he can't break 80 before signing his NLI or if someone else comes along that the college decides it wants more. May be missing something in the rules, etc., but it would seem to be far from set.

About a month ago I played with one of the best juniors in the state of Florida and when I asked him what school he was going to he didn't name any Florida schools.  When I asked why he wasn't looking at Florida schools he told all of the big programs are all set and in fact that U of F in particular has their team set thru 2020.  From what I've been told by others, one of whom is a D1 coach for a small program...the bigger programs seriously recruit players starting at 13 years old.  My friend says that he basically tries to find diamonds in the rough with foreign players and the American players that slip thru the cracks.  

Nothing has been guaranteed in college golf for decades.  They can always promise scholarships and then tell you that they don't have a scholarship for you when you've signed to play for them.  But from everything I have heard is the top programs are looking hard at kids at 13 years old.  Of course, one could always be a late bloomer and find a small school to play for and then transfer to a bigger program.






RH

Sounds like death penalty imminent!


25

#26 JonP

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 01:48 AM

This is my four year old.  Clubs are way too big and I won't think of lessons till he is 6.   Grip it and smash it is all he gets.  


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#27 Hawkeye77

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 09:00 AM

View PostJonP, on 18 June 2017 - 01:48 AM, said:

This is my four year old.  Clubs are way too big and I won't think of lessons till he is 6.   Grip it and smash it is all he gets.  


Posted Image

Give me some of that!

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#28 iteachgolf

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 09:55 AM

View PostHawkeye77, on 17 June 2017 - 10:38 PM, said:

View PostRichieHunt, on 17 June 2017 - 10:29 PM, said:

View PostHawkeye77, on 17 June 2017 - 01:46 PM, said:

View PostRichieHunt, on 17 June 2017 - 08:48 AM, said:

I would probably wait.  Let him develop a little on his own and more importantly...see if he actually enjoys the game.  

The problem with the opposite approach of not getting a child involved in golf...if they enjoy it and you can afford to get them into the game....is if they want to play college golf the younger they get started the better.  U of Florida already has their 2020 team set.  So by the time they are 13 or so, kids are being recruited.  

It may be the furthest thing from your mind to have your child play college golf, but I wouldn't want to put my child in the position when they are 16 years old and having played golf for a few years and they are passionate about the game and very talented but can't get onto a college team because we waited so long to let him start playing a game that he had interest in as a toddler.

I would probably start them in lessons around 8 years old unless the kid is a complete natural that blows it past everybody his age.  It's not so much about getting instruction as it is about who the instructor is at that age.  Again,if he's passionate about the game I would try to find a local instructor that has a good reputation working with kids.  Hopefully he also has a good track record of developing kids into good juniors and college players, too.  

And it's not so much about step-by-step instruction as it is about giving the child direction.  Let the child kinda do their own thing, but try to keep them 'coloring between the lines.'  Furthermore, pretty much up until he's about 15 or so, he'll be better off spending more time on the golf course than the driving range.  Most parents think the opposite and the kids that almost always end up being the best are the ones that are out playing on the course more often lapping the kids that spend their time on the driving range.







RH

For 2020-2021, they are still just under 2 1/2 years to being able to sign an early national letter of intent, aren't they? So things would be far from "set" in the world of college athletics these days? That 15 year old you think is guaranteed to play at Florida isn't guaranteed if he can't break 80 before signing his NLI or if someone else comes along that the college decides it wants more. May be missing something in the rules, etc., but it would seem to be far from set.

About a month ago I played with one of the best juniors in the state of Florida and when I asked him what school he was going to he didn't name any Florida schools.  When I asked why he wasn't looking at Florida schools he told all of the big programs are all set and in fact that U of F in particular has their team set thru 2020.  From what I've been told by others, one of whom is a D1 coach for a small program...the bigger programs seriously recruit players starting at 13 years old.  My friend says that he basically tries to find diamonds in the rough with foreign players and the American players that slip thru the cracks.  

Nothing has been guaranteed in college golf for decades.  They can always promise scholarships and then tell you that they don't have a scholarship for you when you've signed to play for them.  But from everything I have heard is the top programs are looking hard at kids at 13 years old.  Of course, one could always be a late bloomer and find a small school to play for and then transfer to a bigger program.






RH

Sounds like death penalty imminent!

How do you figure?  Can offer a scholarship at any age.  6th and 7th graders are getting offers in football. They can't sign the NLI until senior year but they are recruiting middle schoolers.  Tiger got his first letter from Stanford at like 10 years old. I've had 4 kids verbally commit at 14 years old, all to D1 schools in the state of FL. It's very common at all the top programs in every sport and there is absolutely nothing against the rules about it

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#29 Hawkeye77

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 02:06 PM

Gee Dan, maybe check your tongue in cheek meter?

Nobody said anything about verbals, offers being illegal. What was said about NLIs was accurate.

Edited by Hawkeye77, 18 June 2017 - 02:12 PM.


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#30 bluedot

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 02:42 PM

To the OP:

This comes to you from a retired teacher and coach, whose career spanned 39 years, and every grade K thru 12.  I was mostly a HS basketball coach, but I also coached golf for awhile.  I'm the father of a truly superior athlete (boy) who is now 26 and still plays golf, softball, basketball, and fishes like a crazy man; he was on the golf course with me from the time he was 5, and we still play every chance we get, which isn't nearly often enough.  But I'm also the father of a daughter that died of cancer at age 24, and I would happily give up my remaining days to get to spend one more day with her; when she went to the golf course with me, she sat in the cart and read, no matter how much I tried to get her to play.  And that was ok, too; I loved being with her, and miss her more than I can possibly express.  I will promise you that these days with your kids are SO fleeting that you need to treasure them for what they are; the golf piece will take care of itself.

Have fun with your kids, ok?  When the time is right for lessons, your kid will tell you; you won't have to ask anybody online.  It won't be at age 3 or 5 or 7, though; maybe by 9 or 10.  Maybe later than that, and maybe not ever, and that won't matter a bit if you raise a good kid.

If you want him to love golf, just let him do what he REALLY wants to do right now, which is to be with his dad; he likes golf because he loves you!  Let him throw rocks in the pond, or catch bugs, or run and race the golf cart, or whatever else.  Take some old balls, and let him hit them in the water; he'll like that at least as much as hitting them over the water.  Show him that YOU love the game, and that you love being with him, and he'll come to love the game even more.  Take snacks, and give him a Skittle or two when he wants 'em; spoil him a little.  Laugh and have fun with him; when he's ready to go home, go home, even if you want to play more.  When he wants to play more, play more, even if you're ready to go home.  Be late to dinner; it'll be ok, and your wife will love you more for spending time with your boy and making him happy.

Please don't look around for golf lessons for a 3 or 4 yr old.  There isn't nearly enough time for your kid to be a kid, and plenty of time for golf lessons.

And happy Father's Day, by the way.  Enjoy it.


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