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Is PUREing still relevant in 2017?


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#1 Stinger26

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM

I know this is a hotly debated subject. And I have read previous posts relating to this topic.

Back when puring first came out, shaft technology was in its infancy. Shafts were wildly inconsistent compared to the ones we see in today's market. (I made this part up, but it seems like a good guess)

I'm wondering if people think graphite technology has advanced enough to make the benefits of puring (if there are any) minimal.

I'm re-shafting some of my longer clubs, and am considering puring them (hate the idea that the logo might not be up).

Thanks

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#2 bcflyguy1

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:08 AM

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM, said:

I'm wondering if people think graphite technology has advanced enough to make the benefits of puring (if there are any) minimal.

Yes, it has.  Lots of independent testing has shown this to be the case.

Can't help but notice that the loudest proponents of shaft puring are the custom fitting places that have that equipment they need to pay for.

Having said that, if going through that process will give you added confidence in the club, it's up to you to decide whether that confidence comes at good value for what you'll pay.
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#3 That Bob Guy

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:09 AM

Great question.

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#4 pinhigh27

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:43 AM

Never was relevant and still isn't
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#5 BigHook25

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:53 AM

 bcflyguy1, on 08 June 2017 - 09:08 AM, said:

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM, said:

I'm wondering if people think graphite technology has advanced enough to make the benefits of puring (if there are any) minimal.

Yes, it has.  Lots of independent testing has shown this to be the case.

Can't help but notice that the loudest proponents of shaft puring are the custom fitting places that have that equipment they need to pay for.

Having said that, if going through that process will give you added confidence in the club, it's up to you to decide whether that confidence comes at good value for what you'll pay.

Agree with this and also seen tests that showed no difference in performance of a "pured" shaft versus one that is not.  I also think the tolerances and technology with the golf shafts is so much better now.  Just think back in the 80's and even into the 90's how cheap some of the graphite shafts were.  Now, many of the graphite shafts are made with a composite of materials and are very high quality.


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#6 Stuart G.

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:55 AM

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM, said:

I know this is a hotly debated subject.

Yes, it is very controversial and I'm sorry to say, you're unlikely to get any clearer consensus on an answer to the question then any of the previous threads ;-)

The presence of actual properly handled scientific studies (and with full disclosure and openly published data) is virtually non-existent.   Most results are purely anecdotal or worse, highly suspect in the methods and conclusions.

Also I suspect you are asking about spine alignment in general and not just SST Pure'ing (just one specialized approach to spine alignment).

Edited by Stuart G., 08 June 2017 - 09:55 AM.


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#7 AllstateMaine

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 10:09 AM

 pinhigh27, on 08 June 2017 - 09:43 AM, said:

Never was relevant and still isn't

+1

Just one of the many testings out there...but this is an example of what has been done https://www.milesofg...h-pured-shafts/

OEM's will never do extensive testing in fear that it's actually proven that "puring" works.

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#8 Stinger26

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 10:23 AM

 pinhigh27, on 08 June 2017 - 09:43 AM, said:

Never was relevant and still isn't
Maybe "still relevant" wasn't the right question because I tend to agree with you. I was never a believer. Maybe the better question is...can we completely rule this out now?
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#9 Stuart G.

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 10:43 AM

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 10:23 AM, said:

 pinhigh27, on 08 June 2017 - 09:43 AM, said:

Never was relevant and still isn't
Maybe "still relevant" wasn't the right question because I tend to agree with you. I was never a believer. Maybe the better question is...can we completely rule this out now?

I think maybe what you are trying to ask is whether more modern production techniques have reduced the amount of possible asymmetry in the shafts, (which is completely different from the question on how much, if any, the alignment matters if the shaft does have some asymmetry)?

If so, in general, no.  There are certainly cases that have been found where a shaft had little or no spine or asymmetry - that would be the only objective way to completely rule it out.   And if you have the right equipment you could certainly test a particular shaft to see how much asymmetry it might have and rule out alignment on an individual case-by-case bases.  But as a generalization (even for a particular shaft model), there really isn't enough data to tell us how that has been trending over the years.   It probably has improved somewhat - but not enough to eliminate the issue of asymmetry.

Edited by Stuart G., 08 June 2017 - 11:03 AM.


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#10 apprenti23

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 03:49 PM

In that test from Miles of Golf I'd love to see actually data rather than only averages. In the testing on average the testers hit it longer yet slightly less accurate and people preferred the feel of the PURED shafts.


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#11 BigHook25

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 04:43 PM

 apprenti23, on 08 June 2017 - 03:49 PM, said:

In that test from Miles of Golf I'd love to see actually data rather than only averages. In the testing on average the testers hit it longer yet slightly less accurate and people preferred the feel of the PURED shafts.

I wonder if they knew the shafts were PURED before they hit them, so they already had a preconceived bias.  Also one yard of distance is definitely in the margin of error.

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#12 cristphoto

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 05:29 PM

 AllstateMaine, on 08 June 2017 - 10:09 AM, said:

 pinhigh27, on 08 June 2017 - 09:43 AM, said:

Never was relevant and still isn't

+1

Just one of the many testings out there...but this is an example of what has been done https://www.milesofg...h-pured-shafts/

OEM's will never do extensive testing in fear that it's actually proven that "puring" works.

I recall reading an article where Ping did quite a bit of testing on this and concluded with present day technology (the article was about 4-5 years ago) there was no real benefit.

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#13 apprenti23

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 07:49 PM

 BigHook25, on 08 June 2017 - 04:43 PM, said:

 apprenti23, on 08 June 2017 - 03:49 PM, said:

In that test from Miles of Golf I'd love to see actually data rather than only averages. In the testing on average the testers hit it longer yet slightly less accurate and people preferred the feel of the PURED shafts.

I wonder if they knew the shafts were PURED before they hit them, so they already had a preconceived bias.  Also one yard of distance is definitely in the margin of error.
In the article the testing was blind so no.

What do you mean today's technology? Steel shafts are made the same way they always have. Unless you're paying for the high end upcharge shafts then your stock shaft is probably same as old.

 BigHook25, on 08 June 2017 - 04:43 PM, said:

 apprenti23, on 08 June 2017 - 03:49 PM, said:

In that test from Miles of Golf I'd love to see actually data rather than only averages. In the testing on average the testers hit it longer yet slightly less accurate and people preferred the feel of the PURED shafts.

I wonder if they knew the shafts were PURED before they hit them, so they already had a preconceived bias.  Also one yard of distance is definitely in the margin of error.
In the article the testing was blind so no.

What do you mean today's technology? Steel shafts are made the same way they always have. Unless you're paying for the high end graphite upcharge shafts then your stock shaft is probably same as old.

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#14 sailfishchris

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 07:56 PM









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#15 RogerinNewZealand

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:30 AM

To Cristphoto,

About 3 years ago i bought some S58 irons.7 iron was real harsh and they were nothing special.
So i pulled the shafts, spine aligned them and whole set was a lot nicer to use.
Thats a simple example from me.

To SelfishChris.... great example !!!

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#16 Howard Jones

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 05:44 AM

 BigHook25, on 08 June 2017 - 09:53 AM, said:

 bcflyguy1, on 08 June 2017 - 09:08 AM, said:

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM, said:

I'm wondering if people think graphite technology has advanced enough to make the benefits of puring (if there are any) minimal.

Yes, it has.  Lots of independent testing has shown this to be the case.

Can't help but notice that the loudest proponents of shaft puring are the custom fitting places that have that equipment they need to pay for.

Having said that, if going through that process will give you added confidence in the club, it's up to you to decide whether that confidence comes at good value for what you'll pay.

Agree with this and also seen tests that showed no difference in performance of a "pured" shaft versus one that is not.  I also think the tolerances and technology with the golf shafts is so much better now.  Just think back in the 80's and even into the 90's how cheap some of the graphite shafts were.  Now, many of the graphite shafts are made with a composite of materials and are very high quality.

Has anyone of you seen what tolerances OEMs accept for loft and lie or swing weight, or what tolerances shaft manufacturer accept for flex strength or profile differences within production? Has any one of you seen a set of irons where specs was as advertised, or for what tolerances they accept for driver lofts?

I guess the answers to all this questions is NO, but still you talk about tolerances as if they where know numbers and something we can relate too?

Shaft FLO or PURING is a quality control, and by knowledge we improve quality, juts like TT weight sort their shafts to Tour Issue for better weight and flex match. How much it matters is a question of if club specs matters in the first place, and how far off they might be vs what fits the actual player.

I never made a club without FLOing the shaft, and i never will, i both want and need to know specs of the clubs i make, or they could just be assembled in china with the lack of quality control and the tolerances there is. Thats not the kind of clubs i advocate, because you never know what you get.

We have 2 different scenarios here. the first is where a player has been to a TRUE Club fitting, and the demo equipment has known specs. To duplicate the best club found during fitting, ALL club specs must be duplicated, so with Shaft specs, and thats where FLO or PURING comes into it.

The other scenario is where someone is buying a shaft because he thinks it might fit him, in that case, FLO or PURE most likely dont matter at all, since the player dont really know what shaft specs he seeks.

Edited by Howard Jones, 10 June 2017 - 06:24 AM.


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#17 JCAG

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 07:54 AM

As Howard said:

Shaft FLO or PURING is a quality control, and by knowledge we improve quality, juts like TT weight sort their shafts to Tour Issue for better weight and flex match. How much it matters is a question of if club specs matters in the first place, and how far off they might be vs what fits the actual player.

If you want a top quality build you will SST Pure or FLO the shafts. Forget the ball bearing devices.

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#18 PJ72

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 09:13 AM

 Howard Jones, on 10 June 2017 - 05:44 AM, said:

 BigHook25, on 08 June 2017 - 09:53 AM, said:

 bcflyguy1, on 08 June 2017 - 09:08 AM, said:

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM, said:

I'm wondering if people think graphite technology has advanced enough to make the benefits of puring (if there are any) minimal.

Yes, it has.  Lots of independent testing has shown this to be the case.

Can't help but notice that the loudest proponents of shaft puring are the custom fitting places that have that equipment they need to pay for.

Having said that, if going through that process will give you added confidence in the club, it's up to you to decide whether that confidence comes at good value for what you'll pay.

Agree with this and also seen tests that showed no difference in performance of a "pured" shaft versus one that is not.  I also think the tolerances and technology with the golf shafts is so much better now.  Just think back in the 80's and even into the 90's how cheap some of the graphite shafts were.  Now, many of the graphite shafts are made with a composite of materials and are very high quality.

Has anyone of you seen what tolerances OEMs accept for loft and lie or swing weight, or what tolerances shaft manufacturer accept for flex strength or profile differences within production? Has any one of you seen a set of irons where specs was as advertised, or for what tolerances they accept for driver lofts?

I guess the answers to all this questions is NO, but still you talk about tolerances as if they where know numbers and something we can relate too?

Shaft FLO or PURING is a quality control, and by knowledge we improve quality, juts like TT weight sort their shafts to Tour Issue for better weight and flex match. How much it matters is a question of if club specs matters in the first place, and how far off they might be vs what fits the actual player.

I never made a club without FLOing the shaft, and i never will, i both want and need to know specs of the clubs i make, or they could just be assembled in china with the lack of quality control and the tolerances there is. Thats not the kind of clubs i advocate, because you never know what you get.

We have 2 different scenarios here. the first is where a player has been to a TRUE Club fitting, and the demo equipment has known specs. To duplicate the best club found during fitting, ALL club specs must be duplicated, so with Shaft specs, and thats where FLO or PURING comes into it.

The other scenario is where someone is buying a shaft because he thinks it might fit him, in that case, FLO or PURE most likely dont matter at all, since the player dont really know what shaft specs he seeks.
Excellent post Howard!

Checking the mass, flex etc is a must if you're serious about your game. I've bought clubs direct from taylormade and the head weights are all over the place - God knows what shaft consistency they have.

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#19 BigHook25

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 10:12 AM

 Howard Jones, on 10 June 2017 - 05:44 AM, said:

 BigHook25, on 08 June 2017 - 09:53 AM, said:

 bcflyguy1, on 08 June 2017 - 09:08 AM, said:

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM, said:

I'm wondering if people think graphite technology has advanced enough to make the benefits of puring (if there are any) minimal.

Yes, it has.  Lots of independent testing has shown this to be the case.

Can't help but notice that the loudest proponents of shaft puring are the custom fitting places that have that equipment they need to pay for.

Having said that, if going through that process will give you added confidence in the club, it's up to you to decide whether that confidence comes at good value for what you'll pay.

Agree with this and also seen tests that showed no difference in performance of a "pured" shaft versus one that is not.  I also think the tolerances and technology with the golf shafts is so much better now.  Just think back in the 80's and even into the 90's how cheap some of the graphite shafts were.  Now, many of the graphite shafts are made with a composite of materials and are very high quality.

Has anyone of you seen what tolerances OEMs accept for loft and lie or swing weight, or what tolerances shaft manufacturer accept for flex strength or profile differences within production? Has any one of you seen a set of irons where specs was as advertised, or for what tolerances they accept for driver lofts?

I guess the answers to all this questions is NO, but still you talk about tolerances as if they where know numbers and something we can relate too?

Shaft FLO or PURING is a quality control, and by knowledge we improve quality, juts like TT weight sort their shafts to Tour Issue for better weight and flex match. How much it matters is a question of if club specs matters in the first place, and how far off they might be vs what fits the actual player.

I never made a club without FLOing the shaft, and i never will, i both want and need to know specs of the clubs i make, or they could just be assembled in china with the lack of quality control and the tolerances there is. Thats not the kind of clubs i advocate, because you never know what you get.

We have 2 different scenarios here. the first is where a player has been to a TRUE Club fitting, and the demo equipment has known specs. To duplicate the best club found during fitting, ALL club specs must be duplicated, so with Shaft specs, and thats where FLO or PURING comes into it.

The other scenario is where someone is buying a shaft because he thinks it might fit him, in that case, FLO or PURE most likely dont matter at all, since the player dont really know what shaft specs he seeks.

I agree with a lot of what you said, but until I see facts that show a "pured" shaft performs better then a non "pured" shaft, then I'm not sure if puring is worth it or relevant.  If someone can provide me data that it makes a substantial difference, then I would change my mind.

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#20 apprenti23

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 07:57 PM

What is substantial to you? If you think you're going to hit it ten yards further and shrink your dispersion in half you're nuts. It'd be illegal if it made that much of a difference.


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#21 BigHook25

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 12:50 AM

 apprenti23, on 10 June 2017 - 07:57 PM, said:

What is substantial to you? If you think you're going to hit it ten yards further and shrink your dispersion in half you're nuts. It'd be illegal if it made that much of a difference.

Pured might be a difference, I don't know.  I just want someone to show me facts

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#22 scratchswinger

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 01:39 AM

I don't think it makes a difference, I have owned multiple Pured sets and I just haven't seen any benifit.

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#23 Swisstrader98

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 04:48 AM

It was BS to begin with so it's now just complete BS

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#24 Rob McHugh

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 05:19 AM

Let me say at the outset that I know next to nothing about tech stuff except for putters, so I am coming from a completely lay point of view.

My problem would be this; here in Sydney, there is only one place that offers Puring but they are indoors and so any hitting is done off 'mats'. Now I don't know about the rest of you guys but I have never hit a bad iron shot off a mat. You can't catch it fat and the drop kicks are all straightened up. I had a guy tell me he went to the place, paid a goodly sum for a set of irons and could not hit them at all on the course - which sort of validated what I had suspected.

So, am I full of it? :-)

Rob

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#25 jasonp87

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 05:33 AM

I think what Howard said is pretty good.

I think puring and or floing in itself does nothing at all.

You take a driver have it fitted. Clone it and flo or pure one it won't make one difference.

I think it's a quality control thing. In the sense that it will ensure ever shaft is the same flex etc. But again if you take a set of irons duplicate them and flo or pure one and made sure they were all the same flex frequency etc. I don't think it does anything on its own.

My builder retrofitted my irons from Titleist to custom specs. He tested all of my shafts (C Tapers) said they were very consistent across the board etc. Whereas other builds can vary a flex

Driver-----Callaway Epic SZ (9.0*) Fujikura Pro 62 S 45.25"
3W---------Cobra King F6 3/4W (14.5*) Aldila Tour Blue 75 S 42.65"
5W---------Cobra King F6 Baffler 4/5W (17.5*) Aldila Tour Blue 85 S 41.75"
3H---------Cobra King F6 3/4H (20.5) Fujikura Motore Speeder 9.8 TS S 39.5"
Irons-------Titleist 714 AP2 4-PW C Taper S
Wedges---Cleveland RTX 3 (52/MG 58/LG) C Taper S/KBS 610 Wedge S
Putter------Taylormade Spider Tour Black 34" SS Midslim 2.0
Golf Ball--Pro V1, ProV1x, Z Star, B300RX
Clubs TLT'D @ Dans Custom Golf

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#26 Nessism

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 06:05 AM

How much does a shaft flex during the swing anyway?  Just a few inches right?  How far could the head get out of alignment over that small distance due to inconsistencies in the shaft?  Not much.  

Factor in the fact that only guys that heavily load their shafts with a quick tempo and/or a late release will experience a lot of shaft flexing during the swing anyway.  Also, adjustable drivers mean that the shaft may well be rotated during fitting as well so any alignment done during the build will be out the window.

Edited by Nessism, 11 June 2017 - 06:42 AM.

Ping G30 driver w/Adila Rogue Silver 60S
TEE XCG6 3 wood & E8 hybrids
Mizuno Hot Metal irons w/Recoil 95's
Glide 50/55/60 wedges w/Recoil 110's
Ping Anser putter - the "real deal!"

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#27 Howard Jones

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 06:37 AM

 BigHook25, on 10 June 2017 - 10:12 AM, said:

 Howard Jones, on 10 June 2017 - 05:44 AM, said:

 BigHook25, on 08 June 2017 - 09:53 AM, said:

 bcflyguy1, on 08 June 2017 - 09:08 AM, said:

 Stinger26, on 08 June 2017 - 08:58 AM, said:

I'm wondering if people think graphite technology has advanced enough to make the benefits of puring (if there are any) minimal.

Yes, it has.  Lots of independent testing has shown this to be the case.

Can't help but notice that the loudest proponents of shaft puring are the custom fitting places that have that equipment they need to pay for.

Having said that, if going through that process will give you added confidence in the club, it's up to you to decide whether that confidence comes at good value for what you'll pay.

Agree with this and also seen tests that showed no difference in performance of a "pured" shaft versus one that is not.  I also think the tolerances and technology with the golf shafts is so much better now.  Just think back in the 80's and even into the 90's how cheap some of the graphite shafts were.  Now, many of the graphite shafts are made with a composite of materials and are very high quality.

Has anyone of you seen what tolerances OEMs accept for loft and lie or swing weight, or what tolerances shaft manufacturer accept for flex strength or profile differences within production? Has any one of you seen a set of irons where specs was as advertised, or for what tolerances they accept for driver lofts?

I guess the answers to all this questions is NO, but still you talk about tolerances as if they where know numbers and something we can relate too?

Shaft FLO or PURING is a quality control, and by knowledge we improve quality, juts like TT weight sort their shafts to Tour Issue for better weight and flex match. How much it matters is a question of if club specs matters in the first place, and how far off they might be vs what fits the actual player.

I never made a club without FLOing the shaft, and i never will, i both want and need to know specs of the clubs i make, or they could just be assembled in china with the lack of quality control and the tolerances there is. Thats not the kind of clubs i advocate, because you never know what you get.

We have 2 different scenarios here. the first is where a player has been to a TRUE Club fitting, and the demo equipment has known specs. To duplicate the best club found during fitting, ALL club specs must be duplicated, so with Shaft specs, and thats where FLO or PURING comes into it.

The other scenario is where someone is buying a shaft because he thinks it might fit him, in that case, FLO or PURE most likely dont matter at all, since the player dont really know what shaft specs he seeks.

I agree with a lot of what you said, but until I see facts that show a "pured" shaft performs better then a non "pured" shaft, then I'm not sure if puring is worth it or relevant.  If someone can provide me data that it makes a substantial difference, then I would change my mind.

You quoted me, but without understanding my point at all, so il try again.

As a Club fitter, i need to know actual specs of the club used during fitting to be able to make a exact copy of that club.
To make a exact copy of the fitting club, we also need shaft specs, not only for length and weight, but also for flex.

Its being stated that "tolerances" of today is so tight, that a quality test like FLO with weak and strong FLO line is not needed.
That completely wrong, and il show you that on a list of random shafts i measured in my shop.

http://www.golfwrx.c...-1441083805.jpg

For the sake of example, lets say the fitting ended up with PFC 60 S as the preferred shaft.
I had 5 of that model in stock, so now the question is, can i just pick any of those 5 shafts, and make a club IDENTICAL to the club used during fitting?

The answer is NO, depending on how the 5 options of the same model is installed, Label up/down, or to Weak vs Strong FLO line, actual flex will be very different, so i have to pick the shaft where both weight and measured flex is as close as can be to the club used during fitting.

You are stating "but until I see facts that show a "pured" shaft performs better then a non "pured" shaft, then I'm not sure if puring is worth it or relevant."

This is  NOT what this is all about, its NOT a question of if a FLOed shaft behavior makes a difference, but if MEASURED FLEX is equal to the fitting club, and when we measure flex, we know there is a weak and a strong FLO line, so we should measure both, and install the shaft on the FLO line where flex match is the best possible.

We should NOT use tip trim to alter flex on graphite woods to get to a target CPM. messing with tip length changes the shaft profile, so if a non-tipped shaft measure a certain CPM, its NOT a good idea to tip trim a weaker shaft of the same model to duplicate a stronger brother. We have 2 FLO lines on every shaft, we should use the line where flex is the closest.

NOW the question is, would you as a player, after being fitted to actual specs, get a club who feels and works the same as the fitting club, if we just picked any of the 5 shaft options in stock? The answer is NO, and depending on actual specs on the fitting club, we might pick a shaft where flex is a hole flex stronger in this case, and you as a player WILL notice

If we just picked a random shaft of the 5, and installed the shaft as typical with label up or down, the weakest shaft had a butt CPM of 258 and the strongest 265. Thats 7 CPM and we count 10 CPM as one hole flex, so we have options who say they are the same, but almost a hole flex apart.

If we used FLO, but no CPM reading, we dont make it right either.
The weakest option of the 5 measure 257 on the weak flo line, while the strongest option on the strong FLO line measure 265, so now its 8 CPM from weakest to strongest option. Using FLO without CPM reading actually expanded the flex range, we made it even worse from weakest to strongest

This is the tolerances thats actually is present, quality is not any better than this, not even for TOUR ISSUE models, just look at the 2 S-flex versions of Grafalloy TOUR in the same list. They have a difference of 8 CPM label up/down, and 12 CPM if we used weak vs strong FLO line.

FLO with CPM is a quality control to be able to build a copy of a club used during fitting.
The process itself makes little or no improvement to a shaft the player was not fitted to play in the first place, so we DONT FLO for the sake of FLO, but to be able to measure flex to pick the right shaft from stock who is as identical as possible to the shaft used during a fitting.

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#28 rybo

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 07:07 AM

Howard,

Quick question, what is your take on a Pured shaft vs a flo'd shaft as a performance variable?  (I totally appreciate why you do what you do from a quality control/reproduceability perspective)

I have personally seen numerous Pure'd shafts wobble all over the place once the head was added to the shaft.  The offset weight of the head changes how the shaft reacts.

Edited by rybo, 11 June 2017 - 07:08 AM.


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#29 Howard Jones

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 07:10 AM

 Nessism, on 11 June 2017 - 06:05 AM, said:

How much does a shaft flex during the swing anyway?  Just a few inches right?  How far could the head get out of alignment over that small distance due to inconsistencies in the shaft?  Not much.  

Factor in the fact that only guys that heavily load their shafts with a quick tempo and/or a late release will experience a lot of shaft flexing during the swing anyway.  Also, adjustable drivers mean that the shaft may well be rotated during fitting as well so any alignment done during the build will be out the window.

if we use Titleist as a example, the shaft is rotated 90* for each setting, so we will move between weak and strong FLO lines
If the shaft is within normal tolerances of 2-3 CPM from weak to strong, it does not matter, but if the shaft is like the PL AXIS BLUE we get totally different flex when changing hosel settings and thats no good.(252 to 261 CPM)

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#30 Stuart G.

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 07:11 AM

I can certainly understand the concerns about quality and control and the desire for the best match possible.  But since the shaft doesn't bend in a single plane,  you don't really get an exact match unless you match both the weak and the strong plane frequencies (as well as the orientation).   If you match just one (say the strong), then it's unlikely you'll be able to match the other.   You may get a match for the loading of the shaft, but then the unloading occurs on a different plane which has a different (unmatched) frequency.     Unless you can get a specific answer to how each of the planes (relative to how they grip it, load it and unload it, not relative to the FLO lines) effects a particular individuals sense of feel, it seems to me like the effort might not really be giving us what we think it might.

From that standpoint, the only approach that would seem to make sense to me for a true high quality match is to basically use the FLO to test for asymmetry and throw out any where the difference between the strong and weak planes are above a certain tolerance.   But that could potentially be both expensive and time consuming so not something most would find a realistic approach.

Edited by Stuart G., 11 June 2017 - 07:13 AM.


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