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what to look for in a junior coach


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#1 tiger1873

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 03:34 PM

I am looking at changing junior coaches. My current coach is good but I think my daughter has learned everything she can from him.  

I personally think a good first coach will teach all the basics and is much easier to find then one that will help in tournaments.

here is the criteria I am looking for in a coach.

1. Affordable options to teach ( some coaches charge over $1000 a month)

2 One who has played tournament golf in the past. I like to know they know how to first with par or break it.

3. Hopefully has a  history of teaching kids that made it the high level tournaments and had some success.

Not sure what else to look for for but figured this was a good start.

Also how many times does it make sense to do lessons. I was thinking every other week for an hour made sense and more if we needed something.


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#2 heavy_hitter

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:25 PM

My son goes to a high end teacher that works with one of the bigger names in coaching on the PGA tour.  This man is widely regarded as one of the best junior golf instructors in the country.  My son is 12 and lessons consist of general development of motor skills.  He does some swing stuff with him, but that has been at a minimum.  His focus is developing proper motor skills through the growing ages.  He flat out told me, "Bring him back when he wants or you think he needs to come back."  I spend $150.00 a pop and have only seen him 5 times in 5 months.  My sons average score dropped from a 75.8 to a 72.2.  Not by his instructor coaching him golf, well a little bit, but giving him 2 home drills and fitness exercises that he works on 3 days a week.  

At your daughters age, I would say someone that is geared more toward physical development while teaching a base of good fundamentals.

What does breaking par have to do with being able to coach?  Look up the careers of Butch Harmon, Claude Harmon, Jim McClean, Hank Haney, etc. etc. etc.  These guys were not record breaking players, but they are all great coaches.

If you are near the Dallas area you need to see Denny Sales.

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#3 tiger1873

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 05:08 PM

We are in the DFW area so there are a lot coaches to choose from that are very good. Almost too many because it hard to pick one.  I have easy access to both Hank Haney and Even a Jim Mclean school. The problem I have found with those places is there pretty much mills. Your not going to get Hank or Jim teach you unless your willing to pay for it. At a certain point you either going to have pay a lot to get the better instructors or find someone else. In this area there are better choices for the money.


The point about breaking par is I like to know they could play at one time and understand course management. Plenty of instructors I've met are great at teaching fundamentals but really are not good at teaching mental aspect of the game do to lack of tournament experience.  I don't care if they win just want to know they had some sort of experience playing golf in tournaments. I think this is actually more critical right now in her stage of development.

I know a lot the best teachers played pretty well I know Butch Harmon a good player and I believe his dad Claude won the Masters. Also Hank Haney and Jim Mclean were pretty good amateur golfers at one time.

I have my list narrowed down to 2 or 3 coaches in the area. She is at a point where it good to change things up a little and see if it helps. Worse case we will stick with the old instructor.

Edited by tiger1873, 30 May 2017 - 05:22 PM.


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#4 rizzo66

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 07:43 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 May 2017 - 04:25 PM, said:

My son goes to a high end teacher that works with one of the bigger names in coaching on the PGA tour.  This man is widely regarded as one of the best junior golf instructors in the country.  My son is 12 and lessons consist of general development of motor skills.  He does some swing stuff with him, but that has been at a minimum.  His focus is developing proper motor skills through the growing ages.  He flat out told me, "Bring him back when he wants or you think he needs to come back."  I spend $150.00 a pop and have only seen him 5 times in 5 months.  My sons average score dropped from a 75.8 to a 72.2.  Not by his instructor coaching him golf, well a little bit, but giving him 2 home drills and fitness exercises that he works on 3 days a week.  

At your daughters age, I would say someone that is geared more toward physical development while teaching a base of good fundamentals.

What does breaking par have to do with being able to coach?  Look up the careers of Butch Harmon, Claude Harmon, Jim McClean, Hank Haney, etc. etc. etc.  These guys were not record breaking players, but they are all great coaches.

If you are near the Dallas area you need to see Denny Sales.
Heaveyhitter Thats great advice for a lot of coaches over teach and don't focus on 2 of the most important skills for tournament golf - mental toughness and physical endurance ( especially with young ladies)  as she gets better everyone will hit it well but the ones that advance have a mental focus that has them believing in their ability at the highest level and physical endurance to platy the last hole with the same energy as the 1st.  Watch holes 15 through 18 on amateur and minor league tournaments and youll see what I mean - they lose their legs and get tired and make mental mistakes. A good coach will only coach when needed and not try and change things for change sake.

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#5 heavy_hitter

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 08:34 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 30 May 2017 - 05:08 PM, said:

We are in the DFW area so there are a lot coaches to choose from that are very good. Almost too many because it hard to pick one.  I have easy access to both Hank Haney and Even a Jim Mclean school. The problem I have found with those places is there pretty much mills. Your not going to get Hank or Jim teach you unless your willing to pay for it. At a certain point you either going to have pay a lot to get the better instructors or find someone else. In this area there are better choices for the money.


The point about breaking par is I like to know they could play at one time and understand course management. Plenty of instructors I've met are great at teaching fundamentals but really are not good at teaching mental aspect of the game do to lack of tournament experience.  I don't care if they win just want to know they had some sort of experience playing golf in tournaments. I think this is actually more critical right now in her stage of development.

I know a lot the best teachers played pretty well I know Butch Harmon a good player and I believe his dad Claude won the Masters. Also Hank Haney and Jim Mclean were pretty good amateur golfers at one time.

I have my list narrowed down to 2 or 3 coaches in the area. She is at a point where it good to change things up a little and see if it helps. Worse case we will stick with the old instructor.

My sons coach knows Denny.  Denny works with a ton of really good juniors.  Denny knows what he is doing and he posts here from time to time.


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#6 heavy_hitter

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 08:35 PM

View Postrizzo66, on 30 May 2017 - 07:43 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 May 2017 - 04:25 PM, said:

My son goes to a high end teacher that works with one of the bigger names in coaching on the PGA tour.  This man is widely regarded as one of the best junior golf instructors in the country.  My son is 12 and lessons consist of general development of motor skills.  He does some swing stuff with him, but that has been at a minimum.  His focus is developing proper motor skills through the growing ages.  He flat out told me, "Bring him back when he wants or you think he needs to come back."  I spend $150.00 a pop and have only seen him 5 times in 5 months.  My sons average score dropped from a 75.8 to a 72.2.  Not by his instructor coaching him golf, well a little bit, but giving him 2 home drills and fitness exercises that he works on 3 days a week.  

At your daughters age, I would say someone that is geared more toward physical development while teaching a base of good fundamentals.

What does breaking par have to do with being able to coach?  Look up the careers of Butch Harmon, Claude Harmon, Jim McClean, Hank Haney, etc. etc. etc.  These guys were not record breaking players, but they are all great coaches.

If you are near the Dallas area you need to see Denny Sales.
Heaveyhitter Thats great advice for a lot of coaches over teach and don't focus on 2 of the most important skills for tournament golf - mental toughness and physical endurance ( especially with young ladies)  as she gets better everyone will hit it well but the ones that advance have a mental focus that has them believing in their ability at the highest level and physical endurance to platy the last hole with the same energy as the 1st.  Watch holes 15 through 18 on amateur and minor league tournaments and youll see what I mean - they lose their legs and get tired and make mental mistakes. A good coach will only coach when needed and not try and change things for change sake.
  

Spot on.  My son was having trouble finishing rounds.  Fitness plan and change of diet on the course has fixed that.

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#7 tiger1873

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 09:07 PM

We have a good golf of fitness coach who she sees so no need to change that.
I have found a special fitness coach is worth every penny and should be part of your team you can go to.

Denny sounds good but is a bit of distance from me. I am little spoiled because I do not have to go that far to go to a guy like Chris Como or Kevin Lozares both are great coaches. We live in a hotbed of great instructors.

I am not so worried about the instructor as what are people looking for in a instructor.  Also it is good to do a lot of lessons in the beginning or stretch it out.

Edited by tiger1873, 30 May 2017 - 09:13 PM.


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#8 agatha

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 12:39 AM

I would say a coach who connects with your daughter is important.  If you have all these great ones to choose from which one will speak to her so she understands.  Which one will go he extra mile to understand how she learns, what are her all encompassing strengths and weaknesses.  My son started with a new coach his freshman year of high school.  When we first went there I wasn't sure what to expect and this guy was not the warm fuzzy type but he spoke to my son in a way he understood and liked.  It might have been a good year till I heard him say something complimentary about him, but that was okay, I knew he was honest and as he said "I don't blow smoke up anyones skirt".  Basically he is great at what he does, he is honest and boy has he developed a tremendous relationship with my son who is now 25 years old.  He took the time to get to know him, understand how he learns, understand his thought process and for that its a very strong relationship, with a deep trust and a respect for each other.  I would think for a girl those things would be even more important, being a woman myself.

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#9 Palmetto Golfer

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 01:55 PM

Heavy, Rizzo66 and Agatha knocked it out of the park.  This is an amazing forum where you can come and get that kind of advice.  Thank you for contributing.

I would like to add one thing.  Since you are helping your daughter, I would try and educate myself as much as possible on golf...which is of course why you are here.  More specifically, try and make sure you have enough knowledge of the swing, short game, putting, mental approach...etc...so that you can fact check the coach.  I am not saying I know as much as a swing coach but...I have certain opinions about what you should and shouldn't do in a golf swing.  I need to make sure the teacher isn't trying to do something that I think is fundamentally wrong.  Also, if the coach wants to change something then there needs to be an acceptable reason for changing it.  The coach my son sees is incredible and we see eye to eye on 99.9% of everything he teaches.

For example...and not trying to hijack the thread...but how could Lydia Ko's parents allow Leadbetter to COMPLETELY change her swing???  I am still in shock by this.  Here is a girl who has made it to No.1 in the world with a beautiful swing and you completely change it based on a theory or swing model???  Yes...Lydia at age 18 should have known better but her parents should have been screaming at the top of their lungs NNNOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!  Sorry...had to rant :)

Edited by Palmetto Golfer, 31 May 2017 - 01:56 PM.


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#10 heavy_hitter

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 02:52 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 30 May 2017 - 09:07 PM, said:

We have a good golf of fitness coach who she sees so no need to change that.
I have found a special fitness coach is worth every penny and should be part of your team you can go to.

Denny sounds good but is a bit of distance from me. I am little spoiled because I do not have to go that far to go to a guy like Chris Como or Kevin Lozares both are great coaches. We live in a hotbed of great instructors.

I am not so worried about the instructor as what are people looking for in a instructor.  Also it is good to do a lot of lessons in the beginning or stretch it out.

If your daughter is under the age of 12/13ish, there is no reason to have a special fitness coach.


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#11 tiger1873

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 03:37 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 31 May 2017 - 02:52 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 30 May 2017 - 09:07 PM, said:

We have a good golf of fitness coach who she sees so no need to change that.
I have found a special fitness coach is worth every penny and should be part of your team you can go to.

Denny sounds good but is a bit of distance from me. I am little spoiled because I do not have to go that far to go to a guy like Chris Como or Kevin Lozares both are great coaches. We live in a hotbed of great instructors.

I am not so worried about the instructor as what are people looking for in a instructor.  Also it is good to do a lot of lessons in the beginning or stretch it out.

If your daughter is under the age of 12/13ish, there is no reason to have a special fitness coach.

Around here almost everyone and I mean everyone including kids who play other sports has a fitness coach. Even in school they work them hard here.   I am ok with it because girls have a hard time  building the strength they need and the classes make it easier for her.

If she didn't do it she would be so far behind I am not sure we could compete around here. Compared to cheerleading and football my daughter has it easy on workouts.  

I also agree with palmetto I don't like a coach to change a swing when things are working.  I personally like coaches that work with existing swings and not try the latest swing. Seen too many coaches that preach that and then see kids regress.

Edited by tiger1873, 31 May 2017 - 03:40 PM.


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#12 Golfingdawg19

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 03:56 PM

Everything you mentioned above is great info. I coached high school golf for 15 years and most of my kids took lessons. I was able to go to many of the lessons and learn a great deal from the instructors. Every student is looking for something different and that is important to know. Some want a coach that will build a relationship with them and truly care about their well being. Others don't care about the relationship angle and want to focus on all golf. I've seen instructors that are very friendly and some of my kids loved it. I've seen other instructors flat tell the kids that if they don't listen and practice that they won't work with them. Several of my kids enjoyed that direct approach while others were turned off by it. Your kid has to believe in whoever they go to and they have to understand what they teach them. Some kids are all about feel while others want all kinds of technical talk. I would just try a lesson with several different instructors and find out which one your child liked the best. Then commit to going to that instructor for an extended period of time and see what the results are.

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#13 heavy_hitter

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 04:01 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 31 May 2017 - 03:37 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 31 May 2017 - 02:52 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 30 May 2017 - 09:07 PM, said:

We have a good golf of fitness coach who she sees so no need to change that.
I have found a special fitness coach is worth every penny and should be part of your team you can go to.

Denny sounds good but is a bit of distance from me. I am little spoiled because I do not have to go that far to go to a guy like Chris Como or Kevin Lozares both are great coaches. We live in a hotbed of great instructors.

I am not so worried about the instructor as what are people looking for in a instructor.  Also it is good to do a lot of lessons in the beginning or stretch it out.

If your daughter is under the age of 12/13ish, there is no reason to have a special fitness coach.

Around here almost everyone and I mean everyone including kids who play other sports has a fitness coach. Even in school they work them hard here.   I am ok with it because girls have a hard time  building the strength they need and the classes make it easier for her.

If she didn't do it she would be so far behind I am not sure we could compete around here. Compared to cheerleading and football my daughter has it easy on workouts.  

I also agree with palmetto I don't like a coach to change a swing when things are working.  I personally like coaches that work with existing swings and not try the latest swing. Seen too many coaches that preach that and then see kids regress.

She is 10 years old.  You shouldn't really care what the other parents are doing.  Just because they are doing it doesn't mean it is the best for your kid.  I guarantee you that you are flushing money down the toilet by having a trainer at 10.  My daughter is 17 and started with her first personal trainer at 17.  She didn't miss a beat and is playing D1 golf next year.  If I had to do it again, I would have started her at the earliest 13/14.  10?  Heck no.  Can really mess up proper motor development at that age.

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#14 tiger1873

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 10:00 PM

If you have the correct fitness coach they will help with core body strength and flexibility. Those are very important at this age.

You don't need to go a coach but in many cases kids like my daughter would rather be on the course then doing exercises. a good golf fitness coach will actually help them develop better motor development at a younger age.

I actually think ballet or gymnastics also can really help develop young kids in Golf or any sport since it will teach  balance and flexibility.

Edited by tiger1873, 01 June 2017 - 07:25 AM.


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#15 Tannerbug33

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 11:35 PM

This is a good question I have been looking into the idea of getting a couch for my son he is 9 and he only plays golf and football. Not interested in any other sport what so ever.  The problem I have noticed is how much skill wise he  looses​ after football season because we don't play near enough golf between November and late February to early March. I am mainly interested in someone working with him once a week are maybe 2 times a month to keep him in good habits.
He loves golf and football both with a passion. I want him to be challenged at both but not much that he gets burnt out


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#16 Palmetto Golfer

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:36 PM

View PostTannerbug33, on 31 May 2017 - 11:35 PM, said:

This is a good question I have been looking into the idea of getting a couch for my son he is 9 and he only plays golf and football. Not interested in any other sport what so ever.  The problem I have noticed is how much skill wise he  looses​ after football season because we don't play near enough golf between November and late February to early March. I am mainly interested in someone working with him once a week are maybe 2 times a month to keep him in good habits.
He loves golf and football both with a passion. I want him to be challenged at both but not much that he gets burnt out

Tanner,

I wouldn't worry about it for at least a few more years.  My son played football and still plays basketball.  He takes at least a 1 month break from golf during basketball season and I would prefer if it was a 2 month break.  Golf can be a draining game from a mental perspective.  I think getting away from it is a good thing at this age.  I know when my son gets back to golf from his break he attacks it.  He never wants to take the break but he is always happy that he did.

One other thing, and I have had this discussion with Heavy, playing other sports like football and basketball can teach you so much.  I noticed that my son was competing harder on the basketball court than the golf course.  He just hadn't figured out how to take the mental & physical toughness from the court to the course.  After pointing that out to him and him realizing that, he played well in his next tournament.  he compete on a much higher level.  Sometimes those other sports can teach kids that.

Good Luck,

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#17 heavy_hitter

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 01:40 PM

View PostTannerbug33, on 31 May 2017 - 11:35 PM, said:

This is a good question I have been looking into the idea of getting a couch for my son he is 9 and he only plays golf and football. Not interested in any other sport what so ever.  The problem I have noticed is how much skill wise he  looses​ after football season because we don't play near enough golf between November and late February to early March. I am mainly interested in someone working with him once a week are maybe 2 times a month to keep him in good habits.
He loves golf and football both with a passion. I want him to be challenged at both but not much that he gets burnt out

He doesn't need a weekly or even monthly coach at 9.  The couch might be a different story.

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#18 tiger1873

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 02:57 PM

I know heavy doesn't agree with me on this but I think all kids who show an interest in golf should be getting instruction. You may not need individual lessons but you should at least look at putting them in group lessons. Lots of places offer weekly lessons for not much money. Just stay away from after school golf lessons held on the playground.

You want group lessons that give them access to team golf so they can play in tournaments.  This can really help them develop their game.

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#19 heavy_hitter

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 01 June 2017 - 02:57 PM, said:

I know heavy doesn't agree with me on this but I think all kids who show an interest in golf should be getting instruction. You may not need individual lessons but you should at least look at putting them in group lessons. Lots of places offer weekly lessons for not much money. Just stay away from after school golf lessons held on the playground.

You want group lessons that give them access to team golf so they can play in tournaments.  This can really help them develop their game.

I actually do agree with group lessons.  Teach the kids fundamentals and let them hack away.

Private Individual Instruction is not needed until they reach a decline in growth.  My son's coach has sent juniors to college and works with PGA guys.  He told me that he is more concerned with physical and motor development under the age of 12 than teaching a swing.  Unless the swing is unhealthy in terms of causing bodily harm, he just wasn't going to mess with it very much.  Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

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#20 leezer99

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:


.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:


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#21 heavy_hitter

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 04:10 PM

View Postleezer99, on 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:

View Postleezer99, on 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:

Longer clubs means more yards. :golfer:

This golf crap is too expensive.  At times I wish my kids weren't as good as they were just so I would have money left for my retirement.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 01 June 2017 - 04:11 PM.


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#22 leezer99

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 06:19 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 04:10 PM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:

View Postleezer99, on 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:

Longer clubs means more yards. :golfer:

This golf crap is too expensive.  At times I wish my kids weren't as good as they were just so I would have money left for my retirement.

I guess coach is going to have to fire up the Flightscope next month and earn his dough.

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#23 juniorgolf18

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 06:32 PM

My advice would be - and for reference, my daughter is 15, sophomore, and committed to an SEC school last March as a freshman and 14 yrs - find a coach who doesn't try to fit her into a box or "his" swing.  Find one that takes her natural abilities and molds them to get the most out of those.  

At these big tournaments, I see all kinds of different styles, two plane, one plane, some "ugly" swings but they are efficient.  There is no way my daughter could do some of these swings, nor they hers, but they all have fundamentals - but they don't "look" alike.  Hope that made sense. lol

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#24 Palmetto Golfer

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 08:50 PM

View Postleezer99, on 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:

Hopefully this will make you feel better.

Got my son fitted a few months ago for LW thru 5W...it was very painful.  Not sure I can do that every year. BUT...in his last tournament on a course with hard fast greens, his ball was stopping while the other competitors were not.  They were still using US Kids irons.

My son gained distance and height with the new clubs.

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#25 tiger1873

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 12:36 PM

Went ahead and did a lesson with a new coach and last week with my daughter.  I think the change will work out very good for her.  1 hour with her new coach was like 5 hours with her old coach. So it's much much cheaper even though the price per hour is more. She gained about 15 yards after the first lesson.

I think the biggest difference is the new coach has a history and has done well in tournaments in the past. The old coach was very good and pretty much is on the same track as the new coach. The big difference is the new coach can explain certain aspects of the playing that helps with getting a low score because he has been there before.  Too many coaches just read theory and can not explain things well.

The other big difference is technology and being able to use it. I also think being able to use a trackman really helps as well.  

The hard thing as a parent of junior is to understand when it is time to change. It also depends on where they are at in learning. When we started out her first instructor was at the closest golf course. He was okay but he really didn't teach much and honestly was not that good. When we found out that she liked playing we looked for a coach that built a good foundation for her to learn. I think that was a good plan because that foundation is what is allowing her to improve her game every day.

Edited by tiger1873, 06 June 2017 - 12:38 PM.


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#26 heavy_hitter

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 09:09 AM

After watching a lesson this weekend, there is no way I would take my kid to someone other than a TPI trained PGA Professional guy/gal.  They do a fitness test the first time they meet with a junior to determine strengths and weaknesses in the body make up.  From there they figure out why you are doing what you are doing and how you are going to correct or change to get the results.  It isn't about doing this this and that with the swing.  It is about strength, conditioning, and physical development to swing correctly and eliminate problems.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 08 June 2017 - 10:36 AM.


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#27 kekoa

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 12:29 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 04:10 PM, said:

View Postleezer99, on 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:

View Postleezer99, on 01 June 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 01 June 2017 - 03:14 PM, said:

.....Especially, when the kids are going through growth spurts which can change the swing a lot.

Just realized last week that my sons clubs were last fitted for him a year ago and he has grown two inches.  He's going to a club fitter at the end of the month.  BAD DAD.  :swoon:

Longer clubs means more yards. :golfer:

This golf crap is too expensive.  At times I wish my kids weren't as good as they were just so I would have money left for my retirement.

LoL, I was saying this last weekend.  Sometimes I wish my son just played chess and sucked at golf. :ban:

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#28 golfer55082

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 08:19 AM

I don't know of TPI certified golf coach; just did quick Google search and it looks very interesting. But still, what do you find a TPI assessment is helpful?

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#29 tiger1873

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:38 AM

View Postgolfer55082, on 14 June 2017 - 08:19 AM, said:

I don't know of TPI certified golf coach; just did quick Google search and it looks very interesting. But still, what do you find a TPI assessment is helpful?

I wouldn't just look for a coach that TPI certified. I believe it just a certification from titleist.  I am not an expert on TPI certification but the one thing I do know is there are different levels and if you are worried about TPI you should educate yourself about it at http://www.mytpi.com. The last thing you want is someone who claims there TPI certified but has not completed the level you need.

I think that is the biggest thing I learned is a lot instructors claim there PGA pro's and have certification but they actually may be just entering the program or working with an actual pro.  What makes it harder is some these people may actually be pretty good but there is a limit to what they can teach.

At the end of the day if you have a good junior that your looking for an instructor I am learning you just need to make sure the teacher understands how to break par.  My daughter was struggling to break 80 with her old teacher after 3 lessons with her new instructor she finally did it this week. I do not believe she would have with her old instructor. He just did not know how to break 80.

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#30 golfer55082

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:48 AM

Any recommendations on a good (best) golf teacher in Minnesota/Wisconsin region?


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