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What's your opinion about the AJGA


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#1 PKennedy13

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 09:30 PM

I've heard a lot of things about the AJGA, both good and bad. What's your opinion?


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#2 ANG

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 02:29 PM

My son did around 3 years with the AJGA. Here's my view.
They are expensive. They are the best run tournaments, no 6 hour rounds, which is nice.  They play the best courses. And the fields for the open tournaments are generally the best around, which in my opinion is the most important thing ( if you want to be the best you have to beat the best)
But honestly if you can get into the invitationals, that's where you will learn about your game. Tournaments like the CB&I, Haas Family,Thunderbird are all unbelievable tests of your golf game with absolutely the best juniors in the country. My son played in 2 US Juniors and he always said the kids in the AJGA invitational fields were the who's who in junior golf.

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#3 agatha

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 09:04 PM

Agree with above, my son played AJGA but he was fortunate enough to get help financially thru the ACE grant program.  It was a tremendous help to him at the time as we just didn't have the money to afford the fees, travel etc.. I strongly feel his exposure to college coaches thru AJGA led to his scholarship to a D1 school where he had an awesome college experience.   He also skipped his high school graduation for one of the invitationals.  I remember that morning like it was yesterday.  He received an email from them saying he was invited and he basically just said "mom I am skipping graduation, you know this has been a goal of mine".  So I went along and we had a great time.

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#4 Thrillhouse

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 09:08 PM

Admittedly I've been out of the scene for a few years but I'm of the opinion that if you want to play at a top D1 school you should play them. They're your opportunity to play against the best fields in front of the coaches you need to impress to get to the next level.

I know it's not an absolute requirement and some guys get to top schools without playing ajga, but if you have the means and opportunity it's in your best interest to play them.

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#5 sui generis

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 09:21 PM

I am privileged to referee several AJGA events in the Southeast each year and I'll tell you these are the best run junior competitions you'll see. My sense is that AJGA is essential for boys, but maybe not so for girls.

Knowledge of the Rules is part of the applied skill set which a player must use to play a round of competitive golf.

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#6 Sean2

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 03:22 AM

Expensive. My best friend's daughter is now on the LPGA Tour. She didn't play much competitive junior golf compared to her peers as they didn't have the money. I was very surprised at what the AJGA costs. You need a lot of money to develop into a top-tiered player...or you better hope you have serious talent along with a father that serves as your instructor. What some of these kid's parents pay annually is astonishing. No "regular" kid's parents could afford it: travel (hotel, airfare, food, car rental), equipment, lessons (locally), golf schools, entry fees, and the like. For example, I knew of one girl whose parents were spending about $40,000 annually to send her to a special golf school...and that didn't include tournaments, travel, fees, etc.

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#7 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 07:53 AM

AJGA Tournaments are phenomenal.  Great Experience and great talent.  To get to a DI or top DII program for boy's, playing AJGA is a must.  If you are a girl from Florida, Texas, or California you really don't need AJGA because you are already playing against the best talent in the Country.

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#8 ANG

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 02:34 PM

View PostSean2, on 17 May 2017 - 03:22 AM, said:

Expensive. My best friend's daughter is now on the LPGA Tour. She didn't play much competitive junior golf compared to her peers as they didn't have the money. I was very surprised at what the AJGA costs. You need a lot of money to develop into a top-tiered player...or you better hope you have serious talent along with a father that serves as your instructor. What some of these kid's parents pay annually is astonishing. No "regular" kid's parents could afford it: travel (hotel, airfare, food, car rental), equipment, lessons (locally), golf schools, entry fees, and the like. For example, I knew of one girl whose parents were spending about $40,000 annually to send her to a special golf school...and that didn't include tournaments, travel, fees, etc.

I don't miss the expense that's for sure. The last couple of years he only played about 12 events per year & we were averaging about $10,000-$12,000, and we drove to all the events no plane fares. That's not even counting the miscellaneous expenses which ran into the thousands.
And we didn't even come close to what other Juniors were spending. There are kids out there that play upwards of 25-35 events a year.
Also the $40,000 a year. That is cheap nowadays. Some "Schools" in Florida are upwards of $75,000-$100,000 a year. And that's only a 9 or 10 month program. The best part of all that  was, my kid was a Muni kid no country club player, and he would get pumped when her saw the buses from the Academies. It inspired him to play better than them and most of the time he did.

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#9 kekoa

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 02:44 PM

Good lord.  And I'm here thinking these US Kids Regional/State tournaments were a bit pricey.  

If my son has what it takes in a few years, no doubt I'll give it my all to have him play AJGA .

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#10 Thrillhouse

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 03:25 PM



I sometimes have parents at the places I practice and play at talk to me about what their kid ought to be doing to get a scholarship because they know I played in college. One of the weird things I have seen (largely because I live in Canada) has been parents setting a schedule to play in the US, but then pick the wrong events.

My answer is that you should spend your budget playing the US junior, junior worlds, and the max number of AJGAs that you can (when I played it was 5), assuming you can get into those events. I have seen kids who can get into those events instead play things like city juniors or lower level events in more desirable places, because the parents want to turn it into a vacation/my kid is traveling for golf thing. While I get wanting to go someplace nice, in my opinion you're either committed to getting your kid to the next level or you aren't. I fully understand having a limited budget, what I don't understand is not using that limited budget in the best way possible. When I was a kid I know for sure that my mom would have rather gone to Scottsdale or palm beach for events, but I got into AJGAs in obscure places like Ohio and New Mexico, so that's where we went (to be fair I was lucky, I got to play plenty in nice places like Scottsdale and Miami too).

It's pretty easy to wind up a 17 year old with 150 age group wins in junior tournaments because you racked them up when you were younger and the talent level wasn't deep, and have no D1 offers. I've had these parents go on rants to me like their kid is getting screwed. Your kid isn't getting screwed, your kid hasn't beaten anybody worth beating in those events, and you didn't play the game right, you didn't put your kid in front of coaches against the best competition.


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#11 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 03:30 PM

View Postkekoa, on 17 May 2017 - 02:44 PM, said:

Good lord.  And I'm here thinking these US Kids Regional/State tournaments were a bit pricey.  

If my son has what it takes in a few years, no doubt I'll give it my all to have him play AJGA .

US Kids Regionals are the biggest waste of money in Junior Golf.  For $295.00 you get a crappy visor and a tournament that doesn't help your ranking.

AJGA Membership is $215.00.  You get 40% off of all Taylormade product up to $2500.00 a year.  You also get a subscription to the Ping Guide and Golf Stat which are great tools to help with the recruiting process.  You get a New Era AJGA hat and usually a logo tee like Taylormade or Polo.

AJGA Open is $285.00 for 3 rounds of golf and a practice round.  The kids get a dozen Taylormade TP5 Balls, an AJGA logo towel, a tshirt, cliff bars/snacks, water, dinner one night which sometimes include parents, AJGA Hat.

It isn't the price of the tournaments that are expensive.  It is the cost of food and travel.

You living in California have much better options than a US Kids Regional.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 17 May 2017 - 03:31 PM.


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#12 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 03:34 PM

View PostThrillhouse, on 17 May 2017 - 03:25 PM, said:

I sometimes have parents at the places I practice and play at talk to me about what their kid ought to be doing to get a scholarship because they know I played in college. One of the weird things I have seen (largely because I live in Canada) has been parents setting a schedule to play in the US, but then pick the wrong events.

My answer is that you should spend your budget playing the US junior, junior worlds, and the max number of AJGAs that you can (when I played it was 5), assuming you can get into those events. I have seen kids who can get into those events instead play things like city juniors or lower level events in more desirable places, because the parents want to turn it into a vacation/my kid is traveling for golf thing. While I get wanting to go someplace nice, in my opinion you're either committed to getting your kid to the next level or you aren't. I fully understand having a limited budget, what I don't understand is not using that limited budget in the best way possible. When I was a kid I know for sure that my mom would have rather gone to Scottsdale or palm beach for events, but I got into AJGAs in obscure places like Ohio and New Mexico, so that's where we went (to be fair I was lucky, I got to play plenty in nice places like Scottsdale and Miami too).

It's pretty easy to wind up a 17 year old with 150 age group wins in junior tournaments because you racked them up when you were younger and the talent level wasn't deep, and have no D1 offers. I've had these parents go on rants to me like their kid is getting screwed. Your kid isn't getting screwed, your kid hasn't beaten anybody worth beating in those events, and you didn't play the game right, you didn't put your kid in front of coaches against the best competition.

This is a very good post. Spot on.

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#13 kekoa

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 03:39 PM

Hey Thrill,

So in your opinion at what age do you really assess the kid's ability to see if it is worth it to spend such large amounts of money. At the 6-10 age range it really seems like the idea is to have fun and I get that.  But at what age do you really hunker down and say let go for it or lets just keep playing for fun.

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#14 heavy_hitter

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 03:43 PM

View Postkekoa, on 17 May 2017 - 03:39 PM, said:

Hey Thrill,

So in your opinion at what age do you really assess the kid's ability to see if it is worth it to spend such large amounts of money. At the 6-10 age range it really seems like the idea is to have fun and I get that.  But at what age do you really hunker down and say let go for it or lets just keep playing for fun.

View Postkekoa, on 17 May 2017 - 03:39 PM, said:

Hey Thrill,

So in your opinion at what age do you really assess the kid's ability to see if it is worth it to spend such large amounts of money. At the 6-10 age range it really seems like the idea is to have fun and I get that.  But at what age do you really hunker down and say let go for it or lets just keep playing for fun.

Not Thrill...  but for Boy's as a 6th grader.  For girl's at 7th or 8th grade.

If your boy at around 8-10 can put up below par numbers is when you have to start thinking about going for it.  This is with minimal lessons and play and just has a natural ability for the game.  6th Grade year is really when you need to start making the commitment.

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#15 ANG

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 03:54 PM

View Postkekoa, on 17 May 2017 - 03:39 PM, said:

Hey Thrill,

So in your opinion at what age do you really assess the kid's ability to see if it is worth it to spend such large amounts of money. At the 6-10 age range it really seems like the idea is to have fun and I get that.  But at what age do you really hunker down and say let go for it or lets just keep playing for fun.

Let me put it this way. When it comes to boys Junior golf, Most of these kids are "verbally" committed to colleges by the time they are 15. And I know of a lot of examples as young as 12 & 13. If you look at the list of players at AJGA events you will see a lot of them are verbally committed to play college golf.


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#16 Thrillhouse

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 04:05 PM

View Postkekoa, on 17 May 2017 - 03:39 PM, said:

Hey Thrill,

So in your opinion at what age do you really assess the kid's ability to see if it is worth it to spend such large amounts of money. At the 6-10 age range it really seems like the idea is to have fun and I get that.  But at what age do you really hunker down and say let go for it or lets just keep playing for fun.

If I had a boy who was into golf I would do the following:

6-12 play and have fun, if he's into tournaments I would sign him up for whatever was local and emphasize having fun and learning how to compete. If there was stuff to travel to that looked like something he'd enjoy and fit into other family type stuff I would do it, but I wouldn't go out of my way to travel outside of my area for tournaments at this age, I just don't see the value in it because no coach is ever going to look at what a kid did when he was 11 when he's 16 and starting to get recruited.

At 12 I would start to look at the stuff that is ranked, and encourage him to try to qualify for the US junior, and try to get into AJGAs. Obviously he would still play locally, but would only do so if he couldn't get into better events elsewhere. Hopefully by 13-14 he would progress to the point where he would only play his provincial junior and Canadian junior, as well as some of our futurelinks events as filler (these are higher level junior events up here that are weighted heavily for national team selection), and would be traveling to bigger events in the US for the most part. Of course if he couldn't get into bigger events in the US he'd play more locally.

The goal in my eyes is to ensure that by 16 when recruiting really matters the kid would have been in front of coaches enough that they are able to make a judgement about him, and should allow him to pick the right college program for him.

So yeah, I've obviously thought about this one a lot for someone who doesn't have kids yet. Hopefully if i have a golf kid I don't try to live my own failed dreams of being a tour player through him lol!

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#17 4Par

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 05:19 AM

It's a numbers game though... and one that isn't very favorable.... 300 D1 programs, the majority of which do not fully fund scholarships for the golf program and most have 1, 2, maybe 3 openings a year.  

Let's not forget the thousands of kids from out of the country coming here to attend college and participate in sports.

My son and a half dozen of his friends played at the D1 level for lesser programs. A few AJGA events are somewhat close to this area but these kids really just played local and some state level events.  They'veall done great, had tremendous experiences, and are now finding their way through life.

I just wonder if there's too many families chasing something that isn't likely to happen by putting so much effort into AJGA.

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#18 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:30 AM

View Post4Par, on 18 May 2017 - 05:19 AM, said:

It's a numbers game though... and one that isn't very favorable.... 300 D1 programs, the majority of which do not fully fund scholarships for the golf program and most have 1, 2, maybe 3 openings a year.  

Let's not forget the thousands of kids from out of the country coming here to attend college and participate in sports.

My son and a half dozen of his friends played at the D1 level for lesser programs. A few AJGA events are somewhat close to this area but these kids really just played local and some state level events.  They'veall done great, had tremendous experiences, and are now finding their way through life.

I just wonder if there's too many families chasing something that isn't likely to happen by putting so much effort into AJGA.

There is a lot of truth to the last statement.

I know a bunch of girl's playing at or will be playing at the D1 level from that did not chase stars, my daughter being one of them.  If you are in Florida, Texas, and California you are already playing against the top competition in the country.  Juniors can play in other big events outside of AJGA as well.  Bubba Connelly, Pinehurst North South, Junior Orange Bowl, Optimist International, USGA Qualifiers, State Association Am's and Opens, just to name a few that will get you recognized as well as the AJGA.

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#19 Thrillhouse

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:31 AM

View Post4Par, on 18 May 2017 - 05:19 AM, said:

It's a numbers game though... and one that isn't very favorable.... 300 D1 programs, the majority of which do not fully fund scholarships for the golf program and most have 1, 2, maybe 3 openings a year.  

Let's not forget the thousands of kids from out of the country coming here to attend college and participate in sports.

My son and a half dozen of his friends played at the D1 level for lesser programs. A few AJGA events are somewhat close to this area but these kids really just played local and some state level events.  They'veall done great, had tremendous experiences, and are now finding their way through life.

I just wonder if there's too many families chasing something that isn't likely to happen by putting so much effort into AJGA.

If you're good enough to play a full state of AJGA events (which are hard to get into) you're good enough to play at a decent D1 program. Sure everyone isn't going to Oklahoma state but there are lots of good programs out there.

If your kid can't get into AJGAs and you're pumping money into it thinking your kid is going to a top 25 school then yeah, you're chasing something that isn't going to happen.

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#20 4Par

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:12 AM

View PostThrillhouse, on 18 May 2017 - 08:31 AM, said:

View Post4Par, on 18 May 2017 - 05:19 AM, said:

It's a numbers game though... and one that isn't very favorable.... 300 D1 programs, the majority of which do not fully fund scholarships for the golf program and most have 1, 2, maybe 3 openings a year.  

Let's not forget the thousands of kids from out of the country coming here to attend college and participate in sports.

My son and a half dozen of his friends played at the D1 level for lesser programs. A few AJGA events are somewhat close to this area but these kids really just played local and some state level events.  They'veall done great, had tremendous experiences, and are now finding their way through life.

I just wonder if there's too many families chasing something that isn't likely to happen by putting so much effort into AJGA.

If you're good enough to play a full state of AJGA events (which are hard to get into) you're good enough to play at a decent D1 program. Sure everyone isn't going to Oklahoma state but there are lots of good programs out there.

If your kid can't get into AJGAs and you're pumping money into it thinking your kid is going to a top 25 school then yeah, you're chasing something that isn't going to happen.

I kind of want people to understand that effort doesn't trump talent...... yes, if a kid is good enough to qualify and compete in these events, he/she will find a place to play at the college level. But people should be aware that the payback in terms of scholarship dollars may not even out. Play for the love of the game and competition.


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#21 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:44 AM

View Post4Par, on 18 May 2017 - 09:12 AM, said:

View PostThrillhouse, on 18 May 2017 - 08:31 AM, said:

View Post4Par, on 18 May 2017 - 05:19 AM, said:

It's a numbers game though... and one that isn't very favorable.... 300 D1 programs, the majority of which do not fully fund scholarships for the golf program and most have 1, 2, maybe 3 openings a year.  

Let's not forget the thousands of kids from out of the country coming here to attend college and participate in sports.

My son and a half dozen of his friends played at the D1 level for lesser programs. A few AJGA events are somewhat close to this area but these kids really just played local and some state level events.  They'veall done great, had tremendous experiences, and are now finding their way through life.

I just wonder if there's too many families chasing something that isn't likely to happen by putting so much effort into AJGA.

If you're good enough to play a full state of AJGA events (which are hard to get into) you're good enough to play at a decent D1 program. Sure everyone isn't going to Oklahoma state but there are lots of good programs out there.

If your kid can't get into AJGAs and you're pumping money into it thinking your kid is going to a top 25 school then yeah, you're chasing something that isn't going to happen.

I kind of want people to understand that effort doesn't trump talent...... yes, if a kid is good enough to qualify and compete in these events, he/she will find a place to play at the college level. But people should be aware that the payback in terms of scholarship dollars may not even out. Play for the love of the game and competition.

This is a correct statement.  

Boy's and Girl's are two different balls of wax.  This link is a great tool.
http://www.scholarsh...ncaalimits.html

Boy's get 4.5 scholarships for D1 programs for a 10 to 12 man team.  That is 4.5 scholarships only if they are a fully funded program.  It is very rare for a Male golfer to receive a full athletic scholarship.  I am talking extreme cases only and the kid has to be the best of the best.  They can get academic money on top of the athletic money to get a full ride, but 100% athletic money is extremely rare.  So at that point you have to weigh your options.  To play a 15 tournament schedule with 10 in state events and 5 out of state National events it is going to cost you at a minimum $5500.00 and I am not including the price if you have to fly.  For in state events that is driving back and forth with no hotel.  If you start at the age of 12 doing this, you are going to spend over the next 6 years $33,000.00 and this is just for tournaments alone.  Once you factor in lessons, practice, clubs, balls etc. etc. you are easily over $8000.00 a year.  We are now at $48,000.00 over 6 years at a minimum.  If a state college costs you $19,000.00 a year and you get 50% athletically (this is highly likely not to happen either) you are good for $38,000.00 over the 4 years of college.  The only way you earn your money back is if they make it to the PGA.

Girl's are worth more of the risk.  They get 6 scholarships for a 6-12 girl team.  Usually, the top 2-3 players are on full rides.  You are more than likely going to earn your money back.

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#22 heavy_hitter

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:47 AM

Almost forgot....

The scholarship money is also not guaranteed.  You sign a 1 year contract.  If you do not perform, your scholarship can be reduced and that money given to the players that are producing or a new recruit.  They can't cut you off, but they can reduce the amount.

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#23 4Par

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:51 AM

And to take it a step further.... the FAFSA form determines your tuition contribution level.... I saw my son's academic scholarship $$$ decrease as his athletic $$$ increased... lol

So really, unless your kid is truly unique and in demand, it's more about affording him or her the visibility to get noticed by schools and having options.  Honestly one of the best junior players in this area went to D3, had a great time, competed for national championships at that level and is still pursuing a career in golf.

Edited by 4Par, 18 May 2017 - 09:52 AM.


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#24 Sean2

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 04:12 PM

View PostANG, on 17 May 2017 - 02:34 PM, said:

View PostSean2, on 17 May 2017 - 03:22 AM, said:

Expensive. My best friend's daughter is now on the LPGA Tour. She didn't play much competitive junior golf compared to her peers as they didn't have the money. I was very surprised at what the AJGA costs. You need a lot of money to develop into a top-tiered player...or you better hope you have serious talent along with a father that serves as your instructor. What some of these kid's parents pay annually is astonishing. No "regular" kid's parents could afford it: travel (hotel, airfare, food, car rental), equipment, lessons (locally), golf schools, entry fees, and the like. For example, I knew of one girl whose parents were spending about $40,000 annually to send her to a special golf school...and that didn't include tournaments, travel, fees, etc.

I don't miss the expense that's for sure. The last couple of years he only played about 12 events per year & we were averaging about $10,000-$12,000, and we drove to all the events no plane fares. That's not even counting the miscellaneous expenses which ran into the thousands.
And we didn't even come close to what other Juniors were spending. There are kids out there that play upwards of 25-35 events a year.
Also the $40,000 a year. That is cheap nowadays. Some "Schools" in Florida are upwards of $75,000-$100,000 a year. And that's only a 9 or 10 month program. The best part of all that  was, my kid was a Muni kid no country club player, and he would get pumped when her saw the buses from the Academies. It inspired him to play better than them and most of the time he did.

That's crazy! And, good for your son!!

It's difficult for a lower or middle class family to participate in golf at the elite level. My friend's daughter played 6 to 8 events a year, while her peers were playing at least twice that many, and spending her winters just outside of Boston, and not in a warmer clime, which is where most everyone else was.

With a few exception they drove...and as you know it's not a "drive down the street" kind of drive! They would also stay at motels up to 1.5 hours away from the course to save money.

A family must have money or it is very difficult for their child to compete at the highest amateur level. And, colleges have absolutely no interest in what a kid did in high school golf...they look at top amateur event finishes, which would include playing a number of AJGA events all around the country.

Edited by Sean2, 18 May 2017 - 04:13 PM.

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#25 agatha

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 09:51 PM

Hey let me just say again, there are ways for kids who don't have money to play.  AJGA  has the ACE Grant program, it is designed for players who have the talent but not the finances to play in their events.  I know this because my son was fortunate enough to receive it for 3 seasons.  I am 100% confident that he got noticed by colleges because of the AJGA.  And Heavy Hitter, he was one of the extremely rare kids who got recruited on 80% of a full and then received a full athletic scholarship for soph junior and senior years, no academic it was all for golf.

It was a mid major program, top 60's generally but talk about a kid getting opportunity.  We are so thankful for the organizations and people who helped out my son so he could achieve his goals regarding college golf.  I also think the coach saw something in him and took a bit of a gamble because he was not the best, he was solid but the coach went with his gut feeling.  Anyway, by the time he graduated he ended up being the best golfer his college had ever had, broke many records and was awarded the top male athlete for all sports at his university his senior year.  I tear up just thinking about it.  Especially since he skipped his graduation for a golf tournament!!  

Point is there are ways to do it without being wealthy because we were certainly not.  Ask about scholarships for junior tours, they are out there for those who need it.   Good luck to all of you parents watching their kids go thru the process.  It;s a fun adventure.


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#26 tiger1873

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:53 AM

I think the hardest thing as a parent is you have evaluate how much talent your kid truly has.

I see a lot of people who think if there kid places first in a regional or world that that suddenly believe there kids are better then They really are because they had a good day.

If your kid is scores a 65 but then scores a 85 there not consistent enough. A true good player you can almost predict there scores before they even play in a tournament. The best kids I see score the same score day in day out.  very very few kids actually do this.

Who would you rather have on your team a player who can score 1 or two above par everyday or a kid that can score 65 or 90 depending on the type of day there having.

Edited by tiger1873, 19 May 2017 - 08:56 AM.


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#27 heavy_hitter

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:54 AM

View Postagatha, on 18 May 2017 - 09:51 PM, said:

Hey let me just say again, there are ways for kids who don't have money to play.  AJGA  has the ACE Grant program, it is designed for players who have the talent but not the finances to play in their events.  I know this because my son was fortunate enough to receive it for 3 seasons.  I am 100% confident that he got noticed by colleges because of the AJGA.  And Heavy Hitter, he was one of the extremely rare kids who got recruited on 80% of a full and then received a full athletic scholarship for soph junior and senior years, no academic it was all for golf.

It was a mid major program, top 60's generally but talk about a kid getting opportunity.  We are so thankful for the organizations and people who helped out my son so he could achieve his goals regarding college golf.  I also think the coach saw something in him and took a bit of a gamble because he was not the best, he was solid but the coach went with his gut feeling.  Anyway, by the time he graduated he ended up being the best golfer his college had ever had, broke many records and was awarded the top male athlete for all sports at his university his senior year.  I tear up just thinking about it.  Especially since he skipped his graduation for a golf tournament!!  

Point is there are ways to do it without being wealthy because we were certainly not.  Ask about scholarships for junior tours, they are out there for those who need it.   Good luck to all of you parents watching their kids go thru the process.  It;s a fun adventure.

That is awesome.

We certainly aren't wealthy, although we don't qualify for the Ace Grant.  We just do it smart.  If you do it smart you don't have to travel all around chasing stars.

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#28 agatha

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:57 AM

View Posttiger1873, on 19 May 2017 - 08:53 AM, said:

I think the hardest thing as a parent is you have evaluate how much talent your kid truly has.

I see a lot of people who think if there kid places first in a regional or world that that suddenly believe there kids are better then They really are because they had a good day.

If your kid is scores a 65 but then scores a 85 there not consistent enough. A true good player you can almost predict there scores before they even play in a tournament. The best kids I see score the same score day in day out.  very very few kids actually do this.

Who would you rather have on your team a player who can score 1 or two par above everyday or a kid that can score 65 or 85 depending on the type of day there having.

Scott Cartwright Cal Poly coach said he would rather have a player who can go really low one day and not so great another because it is a team sport.  I would have thought the same thing until he told me that regarding what he looks for.

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#29 tiger1873

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:11 AM

View Postagatha, on 19 May 2017 - 08:57 AM, said:


Scott Cartwright Cal Poly coach said he would rather have a player who can go really low one day and not so great another because it is a team sport.  I would have thought the same thing until he told me that regarding what he looks for.

That may be true for Cal Poly because he knows he can't recruit the players that are going to Stanford, USC or UCLA.   Plus the best players turn pro  and they lose them after a year or so.

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#30 tiger1873

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:22 AM

I should also add if your shooting to go to a school like Cal Poly you probably not good enough.  The kids that go there probably had Stanford or Arizona state on their mind but are not scoring or winning enough so they end up there.

Plus Cal Poly is not really a school that is expensive and hard to get in from a academic point of view.

Edited by tiger1873, 19 May 2017 - 09:23 AM.


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