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Poll on preteen junior golfer (10, 11, 12) practice / play hours in the summer


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Poll: Poll on preteen junior golf (10, 11, 12) practice / play time during summer (12 member(s) have cast votes)

My preteen (10, 11, 12) son/daughter plays/practices ___ hours of golf per week in the summer.

  1. Less than 7 Hours (1 votes [8.33%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 8.33%

  2. 7 - 11 hours (3 votes [25.00%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 25.00%

  3. 11 - 15 hours (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. 15 - 20 hours (2 votes [16.67%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 16.67%

  5. 20 - 25 hours (1 votes [8.33%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 8.33%

  6. 25 - 30 hours (1 votes [8.33%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 8.33%

  7. 30 - 35 hours (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  8. 35 - 40 hours (1 votes [8.33%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 8.33%

  9. 40 - 45 hours (1 votes [8.33%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 8.33%

  10. More than 45 hours (2 votes [16.67%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 16.67%

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#1 golfer55082

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 11:21 AM

Golf tournament peak season is around the corner!  There have been a lot of discussion recently on how many hours junior golfs need to practice and play in the summer in order to get their game tournament ready.  I create a poll to collect the data from this forum.  Please cast the poll if you:

- have sons or daughters who actively play golf, and are currently / plan to compete in golf tournaments this summer;
- they are preteen, meaning at least 10 year old but under 13.

Regardless, please comment on how many hours they SHOULD play.

Thanks.

Edited by golfer55082, 05 May 2017 - 11:26 AM.


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#2 golfer55082

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 11:27 AM

My son is 12 and he practices and plays about 24  hours each week during summer break.  The play / practice time ratio is about 1:1.

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#3 heavy_hitter

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 12:04 PM

Choosing not to vote in this poll.  There is a big difference in the maturity and physical attributes of a 10 year old and an 11 year old.  It also doesn't take into consideration of what level of golfer the kid is or how much they practice the rest of the year.

My son will be 12 and will probably be on the golf course during the summer 42+ hours a week.  We live on a course and that is what he likes to do.  It is also different for Florida, Texas, and most Californians.  We are in tournament season year round.  We could pretty much play in a tournament every weekend of the entire year.  He is on the course during the school year on average 20+ hours a week because our close only closes when there is too much rain.

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#4 tiger1873

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 02:44 PM

I have to agree with Heavy on this we in Texas and golf is year round.  My daughter loves to be on the course will practice every day. She easily does above 40 hours a week with golf.  We also golf year round and the only reason it stops is because of the weather.  We also get many days over 100 degrees that limits practice time in the summer.

There is a big difference between kids too. Some kids simply are ok with 4 hours a week otherwise they will be burned out. Others like my daughter will outlast almost all the adults To be honest the only reason she is not practicing 60 hours a week is because I will not let her be out that much. Also at a certain point natural talent actually matters and they will not improve no matter how much they practice.

Kids will practice because they like it and their parents can afford to let them. I seen the same thing with football, dance or just about any other sport out there.

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#5 heavy_hitter

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 03:02 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 05 May 2017 - 02:44 PM, said:

I have to agree with Heavy on this we in Texas and golf is year round.  My daughter loves to be on the course will practice every day. She easily does above 40 hours a week with golf.  We also golf year round and the only reason it stops is because of the weather.  We also get many days over 100 degrees that limits practice time in the summer.

There is a big difference between kids too. Some kids simply are ok with 4 hours a week otherwise they will be burned out. Others like my daughter will outlast almost all the adults To be honest the only reason she is not practicing 60 hours a week is because I will not let her be out that much. Also at a certain point natural talent actually matters and they will not improve no matter how much they practice.

Kids will practice because they like it and their parents can afford to let them. I seen the same thing with football, dance or just about any other sport out there.

My other thought is, what is considered practice?

Some people think being at the range banging balls, putting drills, and short game station is practice.  Others think playing 18 holes and working on the course is practice.  My son will do both.  He will spend a couple of hours in the morning at the range practicing different skills.  He will go back in the afternoon and play 18-36 holes during the summer.  He is also going to a collegiate camp and a local summer camp.  To be honest, summertime in Florida is more like a break from tournament golf at the pre teen years.


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#6 tiger1873

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 03:31 PM

To me practice for my daughter is when ever you are not playing tournament or social golf.  Sometimes she does the range other times she may go out on the course or practice at the chipping range.  When she is on the course she try's recreate problem shots she had in tournaments.

Tournaments slow down here in the summer so it's like florida as it's a break from them.  No reason to send a preteen out in 100 degree hit to play in a tournament every weekend.  We might do 2 or 3 tournaments he whole summer since it helps drive practice.

Edited by tiger1873, 05 May 2017 - 03:32 PM.


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#7 golfer55082

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 11:50 PM

Thanks for replying and sharing both information and insights. I have to comment that there is a big difference between northern states (like here in Minnesota) and southern states (like in FL, CA, and TX) in how the juniors practice golf and play tournaments. Our golf season runs from mid-April (depending on weather) to mid-October, with the peak season from mid-June to end of August, close matching the school summer break. Most tournaments fall in this 2.5-month period, when it is possible to practice as much as needed.  Golf is pretty much pushed aside into negligibleness  from Mid-October to Mid-April, at least for most kids. I still try to have my son hit balls to a net in the garage, and honestly it can quickly become boring and forgotten not too deep into winter . I don't think his golf practice time in the winter is significant at all - probably less than 5 hours per month (yes, per month, not week)  On the other hand, he spends a lot of time on playing hockey in the winter, on average about 2 hours per day. It  is a lot of hockey consider how fast paced the sports is.   Hopefully this will help him become a better athlete in the long run, even though I don't see this help his golf game in the short term.  I think there will be a day that we have to make decision on which sports to focus; we will see how things develop in the next two years...

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#8 jollysammy

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 01:53 PM

My son does practice during the summer with his country club team.  But he was never a great practice player because he doesn't feel the adrenalin in practice that he does in tournaments.  He loves the feel of pressure and adrenalin which makes his shots longer and straighter, so he tells me that he rather play tournaments over practice.  

My response to him was, you just like "expensive" practice.

But for total hours of golf during the summer, I estimate its about 12 hours practice and 32 hours of matches and tournaments a week.

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#9 heavy_hitter

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 02:34 PM

View Postjollysammy, on 08 May 2017 - 01:53 PM, said:

My son does practice during the summer with his country club team.  But he was never a great practice player because he doesn't feel the adrenalin in practice that he does in tournaments.  He loves the feel of pressure and adrenalin which makes his shots longer and straighter, so he tells me that he rather play tournaments over practice.  

My response to him was, you just like "expensive" practice.

But for total hours of golf during the summer, I estimate its about 12 hours practice and 32 hours of matches and tournaments a week.

Your son is a 2018.  That is the biggest load of BS I have ever heard.  If it were my kid I would have made a practice schedule for him to spend time on different areas of the game.  If he didn't do it, I would have ended his career right then and there.  If your kid hits the ball as long as your son does, there is a reason he has a 5.53 tournament scoring differential and still puts up 80's in tournaments.  It is a lack of practice.  Just because they don't like it, doesn't mean they don't have to do it.  There is no reason to pay for 19 tournaments in a year if they aren't going to work at it.  Once you get into the 70's it takes a lot of work with wedges, short game, and putting to consistently make yourself a good golfer.  Talent alone and just playing can only take you so far.  You get to the point where you have to spend hours among hours chipping to get your ball flight as such that you know with a PW you are going to leave yourself a tap in inside of 2 feet.  You have to spend hours on each aspect of the game just to shave a stroke here and there.  If a kid isn't willing to do that, whether they like it or not, they should just be content with being a recreational golfer.

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#10 jollysammy

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 03:17 PM

I think what you don't get is this.  He's a hitter, not a swinger.  Swingers have to pound buckets of balls to groove their swing.  Hitters don't do that.  He does practice, but what he means is, when you are under pressure and the adrenalin is flowing,  your distances, shot shape and everything are different than when you practice without pressure.

He has teammates that hit large buckets of balls over and over, maybe 200+ balls at a time.  He'll hit a small bucket and knows how each club is handling within 2 balls, he will know more in the small bucket of balls regarding what his clubs are doing than they will know after the 200th ball.

He is his high school league golfer of the year and league champion.  His close friend and teammate probably practices twice as much as my son, had lessons every week for 5 years, but didn't make top 20 in the league.  

Johnny Miller once said that to really know how to play golf, you have to play golf.  He knew a lot of guys who were great at the practice mat but couldn't translate that to the course.

Yes, I guess I could've forced him to practice every day for 4 hours on everything, and yelled at him when he didn't learn fast enough or took it seriously enough, but then how would I be different that the Dads that caddie too much?

I have 2 sons.  One that loves sports, this one, one that wasn't that good in sports but he excelled in other areas.  That son is going to graduate school at Arizona State this fall tuition paid and a $20000 a year stipend for being a TA in addition to pursuing his doctorate degree in Astronomy and Physics.   He didn't like to play catch when he was younger and I didn't force him to, so he only had minor participation in sports.  But despite this he graduated from UC Berkeley with a double major of Astronomy and Physics.  Maybe I should've pushed him harder, but I didn't need to, I just provided tools for his success and gave him some guidance on how to get things done, but the rest was up to him.

I've raised my younger son here the same way.  If he wanted to practice more and take lessons, I would've agreed to all of that.  But I'm a stronger proponent that when you raise kids, if you want them to achieve a lot, they have to "want" to do it.  Prior to 13-14 years old he was playing baseball year round until we switched to golf full time, he played on 5 travel ball teams in addition to LL, all stars and everyting, approx 120 games a year with practices, he was probably playing 200-250 days a year.  Now after 3 years in golf he's got a pretty good game.  Maybe if I pushed him harder to practice he could be the next Jordan Speith?

Yes I wish I could afford a swing coach, weekly lessons and all the rest, I can't afford that.  We learn how to improve his game by googling it, and applying whatever works and his actually doing it in tournaments.


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#11 heavy_hitter

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 03:37 PM

View Postjollysammy, on 08 May 2017 - 03:17 PM, said:

I think what you don't get is this.  He's a hitter, not a swinger.  Swingers have to pound buckets of balls to groove their swing.  Hitters don't do that.  He does practice, but what he means is, when you are under pressure and the adrenalin is flowing,  your distances, shot shape and everything are different than when you practice without pressure.

He has teammates that hit large buckets of balls over and over, maybe 200+ balls at a time.  He'll hit a small bucket and knows how each club is handling within 2 balls, he will know more in the small bucket of balls regarding what his clubs are doing than they will know after the 200th ball.

He is his high school league golfer of the year and league champion.  His close friend and teammate probably practices twice as much as my son, had lessons every week for 5 years, but didn't make top 20 in the league.  

Johnny Miller once said that to really know how to play golf, you have to play golf.  He knew a lot of guys who were great at the practice mat but couldn't translate that to the course.

Yes, I guess I could've forced him to practice every day for 4 hours on everything, and yelled at him when he didn't learn fast enough or took it seriously enough, but then how would I be different that the Dads that caddie too much?

I have 2 sons.  One that loves sports, this one, one that wasn't that good in sports but he excelled in other areas.  That son is going to graduate school at Arizona State this fall tuition paid and a $20000 a year stipend for being a TA in addition to pursuing his doctorate degree in Astronomy and Physics.   He didn't like to play catch when he was younger and I didn't force him to, so he only had minor participation in sports.  But despite this he graduated from UC Berkeley with a double major of Astronomy and Physics.  Maybe I should've pushed him harder, but I didn't need to, I just provided tools for his success and gave him some guidance on how to get things done, but the rest was up to him.

I've raised my younger son here the same way.  If he wanted to practice more and take lessons, I would've agreed to all of that.  But I'm a stronger proponent that when you raise kids, if you want them to achieve a lot, they have to "want" to do it.  Prior to 13-14 years old he was playing baseball year round until we switched to golf full time, he played on 5 travel ball teams in addition to LL, all stars and everyting, approx 120 games a year with practices, he was probably playing 200-250 days a year.  Now after 3 years in golf he's got a pretty good game.  Maybe if I pushed him harder to practice he could be the next Jordan Speith?

Yes I wish I could afford a swing coach, weekly lessons and all the rest, I can't afford that.  We learn how to improve his game by googling it, and applying whatever works and his actually doing it in tournaments.

I still think it is BS.  I am coming from a coaching aspect because I am a former football and basketball coach.  Practicing golf is no different.  If you don't want to put 100% effort into something, you need to find something else to do.  Tournament golf is a competitive game.  to be competitive you have to work at it.  

It is free to practice chipping, pitching, putting, and bunker play.  Any Muni will let you practice there for free.  Practice isn't banging balls on the range.  Practice is working on your game 100 yards and in.  It takes countless hours of banging balls 100 yards and in.  I could care less what any kid is doing on the range.  Could care less if he knows what his shot shape is and where it is going.  The game is played from the green backwards.  It doesn't matter where your ball goes at off the tee, and doesn't matter where the ball goes at with an approach as long as you can get it up and down from inside 100 yards.  That takes practice.

You are spending thousands of dollars on tournaments and for what if he isn't going to do what it takes to be a complete tournament golfer?  You don't have to spend a ton of money on coaching.  If you take away half the tournaments he has played in, you could have paid a coach.  If you are getting golf lessons from the internet or golf channel, you aren't getting lessons.  You say you don't have the money to hire a coach, yet you are dumping thousands dollars into tournament golf for nothing if he isn't going to put the effort into getting better.

It makes zero sense to me.  I guess we are raised differently in the south.  If you are going to do something you put 100% effort in it to be the best you can.  If you want to be a garbage man then put 100% effort in to be the best garbage man you can be.  Same goes for school, athletics, work, and play.  It is OK not to be the best, but being the best is what you should always strive for.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 08 May 2017 - 03:38 PM.


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#12 jollysammy

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 04:18 PM

I think we're just getting lost in words.  Both of my sons have been taught by me to give more than 100% effort in everything they do.  When my oldest was in middle school I taught him to give extra effort in any project he did, not just for the grade, but to prove to himself how far he could go with just a little more effort.  It carried over thru high school and college.  He graduated with a 4.7 GPA and had an almost perfect Math SAT.

My golfing son won his league championship by shooting even par at Crystal Springs, the 2nd place guy shot 76, 4 strokes behind.  We know him well, he's a good kid, takes a lot of lessons, plays in tournaments.  He's the one who's dad was fretting that his kid wouldn't turn pro at the rate he was going despite thousands in lessons.  They both shot 79 on the next course, with my son winning the overall with that same 4 strokes.  Don't get me wrong, my son does practice, he just feels that he learns more about how to really play the game when he's playing under pressure, when it means something.  He's a relentless competitor, especially when he's playing for his school as he feels responsibility to help his team.

Even though he was the low medalist at his regional high school tournament with the only under par round 70 at Rancho Canada last year he was more upset that his team missed qualifying for the sectional by 14 strokes.  I told him, you did all you can, you weren't going to be shooting 55 on that course that day when no one else broke par.  He did this as a sophomore, his senior team captain came in tied for 7th with a 73.  This teammate is going to be playing this year for UC Berkeley's golf team.

You confuse my description of my son as someone who doesn't care.  He cares more than most, his approach is just different.
He competes to be the best all the time.  But he learns by playing.

The last hole of the championship showed him at his best.  Both he and the 2nd place guy put their approach shots on the back fringe of this uphill elevated green hole.  The Pin was in the front in this bowl of about 8 ft diameter on a back to front green with a steep false front, the  pin was 5 ft from the false front cliff, the boys were about 30 ft from the pin.  

My son hit a perfect chip that landed 2 ft from the edge of the bowl, spun slightly and then roll slowly toward the pin, stopping 2 ft above the pin, from landing to eventual resting spot was about 4 ft of slow roll. It was so good, the other high school golfing competitors applauded him.  The other guy hit his chip from the same distance off the same fringe but came in too fast and the ball rolled past my son's and through the bowl and down the false front about 25 yds.  He flopped back up to within 18 inches and made his putt, my son played a 14 inch break and made his putt.

End result, my son wins the championship.  

Yes he's practiced chipping a lot, but when asked by another boy how he made that shot, my son shrugged, I just did it.

He did it because he had played similar shots to this under tournament pressure and remember what failed and what succeeded.  You could practice all you want, it still only counts what you do under pressure when everyone's watching.

Edited by jollysammy, 08 May 2017 - 04:19 PM.


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#13 heavy_hitter

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 04:49 PM

View Postjollysammy, on 08 May 2017 - 04:18 PM, said:

I think we're just getting lost in words.  Both of my sons have been taught by me to give more than 100% effort in everything they do.  When my oldest was in middle school I taught him to give extra effort in any project he did, not just for the grade, but to prove to himself how far he could go with just a little more effort.  It carried over thru high school and college.  He graduated with a 4.7 GPA and had an almost perfect Math SAT.

My golfing son won his league championship by shooting even par at Crystal Springs, the 2nd place guy shot 76, 4 strokes behind.  We know him well, he's a good kid, takes a lot of lessons, plays in tournaments.  He's the one who's dad was fretting that his kid wouldn't turn pro at the rate he was going despite thousands in lessons.  They both shot 79 on the next course, with my son winning the overall with that same 4 strokes.  Don't get me wrong, my son does practice, he just feels that he learns more about how to really play the game when he's playing under pressure, when it means something.  He's a relentless competitor, especially when he's playing for his school as he feels responsibility to help his team.

Even though he was the low medalist at his regional high school tournament with the only under par round 70 at Rancho Canada last year he was more upset that his team missed qualifying for the sectional by 14 strokes.  I told him, you did all you can, you weren't going to be shooting 55 on that course that day when no one else broke par.  He did this as a sophomore, his senior team captain came in tied for 7th with a 73.  This teammate is going to be playing this year for UC Berkeley's golf team.

You confuse my description of my son as someone who doesn't care.  He cares more than most, his approach is just different.
He competes to be the best all the time.  But he learns by playing.

The last hole of the championship showed him at his best.  Both he and the 2nd place guy put their approach shots on the back fringe of this uphill elevated green hole.  The Pin was in the front in this bowl of about 8 ft diameter on a back to front green with a steep false front, the  pin was 5 ft from the false front cliff, the boys were about 30 ft from the pin.  

My son hit a perfect chip that landed 2 ft from the edge of the bowl, spun slightly and then roll slowly toward the pin, stopping 2 ft above the pin, from landing to eventual resting spot was about 4 ft of slow roll. It was so good, the other high school golfing competitors applauded him.  The other guy hit his chip from the same distance off the same fringe but came in too fast and the ball rolled past my son's and through the bowl and down the false front about 25 yds.  He flopped back up to within 18 inches and made his putt, my son played a 14 inch break and made his putt.

End result, my son wins the championship.  

Yes he's practiced chipping a lot, but when asked by another boy how he made that shot, my son shrugged, I just did it.

He did it because he had played similar shots to this under tournament pressure and remember what failed and what succeeded.  You could practice all you want, it still only counts what you do under pressure when everyone's watching.

Your missing my point.  This is just something we can agree that we will disagree on.

Awesome.  Your son is the best.  He won a one day championship.  What colleges is he being recruited by?

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#14 tiger1873

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 08:02 PM

I agree with heavy on this. Your boy is going to need and like to practice.

Banging balls away on a range is a waste of time if you do not have a plan. Some kids need to do that just to strike a ball. Generally speaking this means they are simply not good.

The best golfers hit and practice with a purpose. Everyone makes mistakes the difference is the good ones will practice that shot after a tournament so they never have the same issue again. Little by little they make less mistakes. My daughter loves to practice. She loves nothing better when it gets hot here and no one is on the course she will take take it as a chance to make practice shots she is not comfortable making.

For instance last week she was able to go behind a tree and practice hitting it on the green with a draw.  I am pretty sure Anyone on tour does similar things.

Edited by tiger1873, 08 May 2017 - 08:03 PM.


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#15 heavy_hitter

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 07:53 AM

View Posttiger1873, on 08 May 2017 - 08:02 PM, said:

I agree with heavy on this. Your boy is going to need and like to practice.

Banging balls away on a range is a waste of time if you do not have a plan. Some kids need to do that just to strike a ball. Generally speaking this means they are simply not good.

The best golfers hit and practice with a purpose. Everyone makes mistakes the difference is the good ones will practice that shot after a tournament so they never have the same issue again. Little by little they make less mistakes. My daughter loves to practice. She loves nothing better when it gets hot here and no one is on the course she will take take it as a chance to make practice shots she is not comfortable making.

For instance last week she was able to go behind a tree and practice hitting it on the green with a draw.  I am pretty sure Anyone on tour does similar things.

You don't even have to love to practice.  It is just something you need to do.  You must show up to the course with a plan.  My son does not like to show up without a practice plan.  If he doesn't have one then it is just wasted time.  We sit down over Christmas Break and Summer and come up with a weekly schedule that consists of two to three hours of practice every morning.  In the afternoon he has an hour session of practice consisting of 30 min on the range and 30 min putting.  Then it is play 18 holes.  After he is done playing, he spends another 20 min working on something that he didn't do well that day.  He is 11 and loves golf.  He puts his headphones in and works.  He doesn't always like to do it, but he loves golf and wants to get better.  Once you reach a certain point in scoring, it does become a job.  Just the way it is.  The fun is when you play and do well in tournaments.  Nothing more miserable than riding home after a poor performance.  If you don't like that feeling, then you have to put in the work.

We will also do the same thing you do.  When I am out with him we always play with a shag bag in the cart.  At any moment we may stop and just start practicing on a specialty shot.


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#16 golfer55082

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 09:59 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 09 May 2017 - 07:53 AM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 08 May 2017 - 08:02 PM, said:

I agree with heavy on this. Your boy is going to need and like to practice.

Banging balls away on a range is a waste of time if you do not have a plan. Some kids need to do that just to strike a ball. Generally speaking this means they are simply not good.

The best golfers hit and practice with a purpose. Everyone makes mistakes the difference is the good ones will practice that shot after a tournament so they never have the same issue again. Little by little they make less mistakes. My daughter loves to practice. She loves nothing better when it gets hot here and no one is on the course she will take take it as a chance to make practice shots she is not comfortable making.

For instance last week she was able to go behind a tree and practice hitting it on the green with a draw.  I am pretty sure Anyone on tour does similar things.

You don't even have to love to practice.  It is just something you need to do.  You must show up to the course with a plan.  My son does not like to show up without a practice plan.  If he doesn't have one then it is just wasted time.  We sit down over Christmas Break and Summer and come up with a weekly schedule that consists of two to three hours of practice every morning.  In the afternoon he has an hour session of practice consisting of 30 min on the range and 30 min putting.  Then it is play 18 holes.  After he is done playing, he spends another 20 min working on something that he didn't do well that day.  He is 11 and loves golf.  He puts his headphones in and works.  He doesn't always like to do it, but he loves golf and wants to get better.  Once you reach a certain point in scoring, it does become a job.  Just the way it is.  The fun is when you play and do well in tournaments.  Nothing more miserable than riding home after a poor performance.  If you don't like that feeling, then you have to put in the work.

We will also do the same thing you do.  When I am out with him we always play with a shag bag in the cart.  At any moment we may stop and just start practicing on a specialty shot.

How do you track the practice over days, weeks, or even months? What I mean is some stats to tell me that " I spent 65% of my time or 40 hours on long games last week“. Do you use spreadsheet, by memory only, or even some sort of software?

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#17 golfer55082

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:09 AM

Also can you share how you practice? For example if you have 1 hour for long game practice, do you go through all long clubs or selected clubs and rotate every day? For each club, do you hit certain number of balls and move on, or there is a criteria (e.g. 80% with 20 feet of target) before moving on to next club.  Thanks.

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#18 tiger1873

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:44 AM

I can tell you what has worked best for us.  We come with a schedule like it has been said before.  We try to block out time for range, times for playing and how many private lessons we want plus our local club runs a very good academy with classes that work out to be less then $20 a session for 2 hours So we been doing that as well a few times a week.

What has worked best for us to use tournaments as learning experience.  We are lucky because we can play a tournament almost any weekend we want.  Since my daughter is young enough I can caddie for her.  I have found out I should no longer give her advice instead I take notes on what see needs work on. Sometimes it might be a club she is not hitting consitant other times or perhaps it because she had trouble with missing birdies because she was too far from the pin.  

We then talk about the issues she had that cost her the most strokes while playing and work on them.  Over the last year her scores are dropping every tournament.   The more she does this more motivated she is getting so it seems to be working.

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#19 heavy_hitter

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:52 AM

View Postgolfer55082, on 09 May 2017 - 10:09 AM, said:

Also can you share how you practice? For example if you have 1 hour for long game practice, do you go through all long clubs or selected clubs and rotate every day? For each club, do you hit certain number of balls and move on, or there is a criteria (e.g. 80% with 20 feet of target) before moving on to next club.  Thanks.

We don't do anything fancy at 11/12 years old.


We track rounds by using game golf.  Game Golf tracks putts, short game, off the tee box, and approach shots.  It configures a stroke gained statistic and what to work on for each which includes distances.

When he goes to practice and works, we usually space out what he is working on.  He spends more time putting, chipping, pitching, and bunker play more than anything else although there are days he will spend time on the range working.  Length of times will change.  We divide practice times between Range, Putting, and Short Game Areas.  We limit him to two areas per practice session.

A typical practice session may look like this.  We change it up every day to work on something different based on needs.  Most everything he works on is 100 yards in.  At younger ages the swing changes a lot because of growth.  Very rarely work on swing and if he does it is only because he is doing something very specific that is wrong.  Really don't want the wear and tear on his body from the full swing.

8:00-8:15  Warm Up.  Slide, Skip, ASkip, Orange Whip
8:15-8:30  Work Pitching with wedges to targets.  Work with 52 working on technique to improve accuracy.  Locate a flag or target on the range with rangefinder to hit that distance.
8:30-8:35  Water Break.
8:35-8:50  56 Wedge.  Same Drill as above.
8:50-8:55  Water Break.
8:55-9:10  60 Wedge.  Same Drill as above.
9:10-9:20  Move to Putting Green and break.
9:20-9:40  Around the World Putting Drill
9:40-9:45  Water Break
9:45-10:05 Quarter Drill Putting

10:05-1:00  Cool Down Eat Lunch. Play Basketball

1:00-1:05 Short Warm Up with Orange Whip and stretching.
1:05-1:20  Bunker Shots with 56 going to distance appropriate flags on the chipping surface.
1:20-1:25  Water Break
1:25-1:40  Bunker Shots with 60 going to distance appropriate flags on the chipping surface.
1:40-1:45  Water Break
1:45-2:00  Work on chipping technique.

2:00-  Go Play

Edited by heavy_hitter, 09 May 2017 - 11:47 AM.


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#20 heavy_hitter

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 11:01 AM

Also, keep in mind that my son is different than a lot of kids out there.  He is more or less working on specific things and knows exactly what he is doing most of the time.  A bad round for him is above a 75 and he has only had three of those over the past 6 months.  When he goes out and plays he is trying to put together 4 rounds in a row in the 60's.  We also rotate the distances after every 4 rounds he plays.  We also live on a course and he has a lot of access that other kids don't have to playing and practicing.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 09 May 2017 - 11:04 AM.


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#21 golfer55082

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 11:25 AM

thanks for sharing. Appreciate it a lot. As we speak I am adjusting my son's practice schedule to focus more on short game :)

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#22 heavy_hitter

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 11:54 AM

View Postgolfer55082, on 09 May 2017 - 11:25 AM, said:

thanks for sharing. Appreciate it a lot. As we speak I am adjusting my son's practice schedule to focus more on short game :)

View Postgolfer55082, on 09 May 2017 - 11:25 AM, said:

thanks for sharing. Appreciate it a lot. As we speak I am adjusting my son's practice schedule to focus more on short game :)

You won't regret it.  

When my daughter improved her wedge game 100 yards in is when she became really good.  When you know you can stick a wedge inside from say 75 yards it really frees your game up.  When you know you have the ability to get up and down with bogey at worst it seems to really free up the game from a full swing stand point.

My son is basically the same way.  He knows he can get the ball up and down because his iron and wedge play is so good.  He can pretty much anymore get to most Par 5's in two from the distances he plays.  So much so that he doesn't even care anymore if he goes into a green side bunker because he knows he is going to stick the bunker shot inside 10 feet.  He knows that on at least two par 5's in a round that he is going to make birdie.  When you know you are going to make birdie you are already ahead of the majority of the field.  Knowing and Hoping are two different things.  Because of practice 100 yards and in he knows.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 09 May 2017 - 01:40 PM.


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#23 Johnr889

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 03:57 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 08 May 2017 - 04:49 PM, said:

View Postjollysammy, on 08 May 2017 - 04:18 PM, said:

I think we're just getting lost in words.  Both of my sons have been taught by me to give more than 100% effort in everything they do.  When my oldest was in middle school I taught him to give extra effort in any project he did, not just for the grade, but to prove to himself how far he could go with just a little more effort.  It carried over thru high school and college.  He graduated with a 4.7 GPA and had an almost perfect Math SAT.

My golfing son won his league championship by shooting even par at Crystal Springs, the 2nd place guy shot 76, 4 strokes behind.  We know him well, he's a good kid, takes a lot of lessons, plays in tournaments.  He's the one who's dad was fretting that his kid wouldn't turn pro at the rate he was going despite thousands in lessons.  They both shot 79 on the next course, with my son winning the overall with that same 4 strokes.  Don't get me wrong, my son does practice, he just feels that he learns more about how to really play the game when he's playing under pressure, when it means something.  He's a relentless competitor, especially when he's playing for his school as he feels responsibility to help his team.

Even though he was the low medalist at his regional high school tournament with the only under par round 70 at Rancho Canada last year he was more upset that his team missed qualifying for the sectional by 14 strokes.  I told him, you did all you can, you weren't going to be shooting 55 on that course that day when no one else broke par.  He did this as a sophomore, his senior team captain came in tied for 7th with a 73.  This teammate is going to be playing this year for UC Berkeley's golf team.

You confuse my description of my son as someone who doesn't care.  He cares more than most, his approach is just different.
He competes to be the best all the time.  But he learns by playing.

The last hole of the championship showed him at his best.  Both he and the 2nd place guy put their approach shots on the back fringe of this uphill elevated green hole.  The Pin was in the front in this bowl of about 8 ft diameter on a back to front green with a steep false front, the  pin was 5 ft from the false front cliff, the boys were about 30 ft from the pin.  

My son hit a perfect chip that landed 2 ft from the edge of the bowl, spun slightly and then roll slowly toward the pin, stopping 2 ft above the pin, from landing to eventual resting spot was about 4 ft of slow roll. It was so good, the other high school golfing competitors applauded him.  The other guy hit his chip from the same distance off the same fringe but came in too fast and the ball rolled past my son's and through the bowl and down the false front about 25 yds.  He flopped back up to within 18 inches and made his putt, my son played a 14 inch break and made his putt.

End result, my son wins the championship.  

Yes he's practiced chipping a lot, but when asked by another boy how he made that shot, my son shrugged, I just did it.

He did it because he had played similar shots to this under tournament pressure and remember what failed and what succeeded.  You could practice all you want, it still only counts what you do under pressure when everyone's watching.

Your missing my point.  This is just something we can agree that we will disagree on.

Awesome.  Your son is the best.  He won a one day championship.  What colleges is he being recruited by?
I agree with you, but your being kind of a ******. Don't have to make fun of someone just because he may not be being recruited by top ranked colleges. I took the more play less practice approach last year and it didn't pay off. I have been putting more practice time in chipping and putting this year. Seen my game start to come around to where it is now. Only been playing for a year though and still have lots to learn.
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#24 HawkFan03

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Posted 27 June 2017 - 11:01 PM

Who cares how someone uses their time and money. It's not yours, maybe worry about yourself and not call BS on a fellow board member.

Last time I checked golf was a GAME.

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