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Dealing with Dads who Caddie too much


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#61 Baitkiller

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 04:37 PM

View PostBeerPerHole, on 20 April 2017 - 12:03 PM, said:

This reminds me... I played pop warner football. I'd never be involved in junior football now. For one, I think it's too hard on the body (mine is a living example). But, the parental behavior is horrible. My neighbor/buddy coaches with his son the same age as mine (actually, they were born on the same day!). The stories I hear from him are troubling.
I coach middle school football and U11 girls soccer and assist junior and middle school golf teams .The soccer parents are the worst by far and its not even close. The golf parents helicopter bad and its annoying but ignorable. We get home schoolers in golf who think they are all that because that's all they hear. Cant teach them anything. The regular kids can be tough on them.

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#62 RedWolfWay

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 11:58 PM

I tell my father all the time I cannot be more appreciative of his supportive/relaxed nature on the course when it came to observing me all through junior golf and into college. Makes my skin crawl when I see a dad ridicule his child after hitting a poor shot, as if the child isn't giving it their best effort. Most of these dads are 20+ cappers who need to hit the range themselves...
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#63 heavy_hitter

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 08:09 AM

View PostRedWolfWay, on 23 April 2017 - 11:58 PM, said:

I tell my father all the time I cannot be more appreciative of his supportive/relaxed nature on the course when it came to observing me all through junior golf and into college. Makes my skin crawl when I see a dad ridicule his child after hitting a poor shot, as if the child isn't giving it their best effort. Most of these dads are 20+ cappers who need to hit the range themselves...

20+ handicapper and how good the father is has nothing to do with it.

I know fathers who are really good, but their kids are just average.  They will still ridicule their kids.  It is the parents that don't understand how hard this game is in tournament pressure.  They live vicariously through their kids.  You know who they are as well because the first thing the kid does when he/she doesn't perform is look over at their parents.

You are right, the best thing a parent can do is relax on the course and make their kids feel comfortable.  Best thing a parent can do when not caddying is stay at home, or walk ahead of the players.  Don't stand on top of them every shot.  Move forward to where their ball will land.  I see too many parents just hovering over their kids on every shot.  I know that kid is in for a long day.

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#64 tiger1873

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 01:01 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 24 April 2017 - 08:09 AM, said:

20+ handicapper and how good the father is has nothing to do with it.

I know fathers who are really good, but their kids are just average.  They will still ridicule their kids.  It is the parents that don't understand how hard this game is in tournament pressure.  They live vicariously through their kids.  You know who they are as well because the first thing the kid does when he/she doesn't perform is look over at their parents.

You are right, the best thing a parent can do is relax on the course and make their kids feel comfortable.  Best thing a parent can do when not caddying is stay at home, or walk ahead of the players.  Don't stand on top of them every shot.  Move forward to where their ball will land.  I see too many parents just hovering over their kids on every shot.  I know that kid is in for a long day.

Have to agree with this a lot. Nothing worse then the dad who hovers over every shot.  They end up playing against the other kids instead of just let their kids have fun.

I will say though that girls are a lot harder to caddie then the boys there is a lot emotions that go on there.  The toughest part for me is if something doesn't go right they will dwell on it.  One bad shot can cause them to lose it and just fall apart.  I been in a tournament where every girl in the group was bawling at point in another because of a bad shot.  My goal this year for my daughter is getting her to keep her emotions in check.  It took about 4 or 5 tournaments but it has gotten a lot better.   It is a lot more fun now because I can sit back and admire her shots.

Edited by tiger1873, 24 April 2017 - 01:14 PM.


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#65 jollysammy

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Posted 06 May 2017 - 08:04 AM

This is a topic that is present in every sport, not just golf.  

I remember my son playing with a Korean boy that was just slightly older than my son whose dad was talking to him on every shot, even 8 inch putts, almost yelling at him, in Korean.  The boy missed 3 1 ft putts.  Flash forward to the championship, he's paired with my son, but lo and behold, the dad was on a business trip and the mom was there just riding a cart and saying nothing, that boy looked so happy playing, he played good and even when he had a problem he had the biggest smile on his face.   He was free from stress and just enjoying himself.

I think back on my times with my son in sports.  I was recruited to be a LL tee ball coach.  I didn't know much about baseball.  Our first practice, after 45 minutes, my son ran off into the field and was upset, the other boys asked, what's wrong with Alex?  I caught up with him and realized that in all the practice I was talking and helping every boy, except for him.

I then looked him right in the eye and said. " I have a responsibility to make everyone on your team a better player and teammate. You and I can practice together anytime, but at the team practice, they need me to help them get better and I need you to help your teammates to get better to have a stronger team.  And if you can't accept that, then I can't be your coach and baseball ends now."  I was giving a 5 year old an ultimatum.  But ever since that moment 12 years ago, he never did that again or ever got upset in sports.  

He realized in all our sports together that I would not be giving him attention when I coached and he did everything to be the best teammate and athlete he could be to set an example for his team.  I remember when he was playing the last year I coached in AA baseball.  We had a good team, but sometimes we lost.  And after a couple of games, some boys would be crying at the end of the game.  I finally told them this...

Why are you guys crying?  I come here 2 hrs before the game, lugging the equipment bag, drag the fields, line the fields and then, I don't even get to play the game!  I should be the one crying.  I would trade places with you anytime.  That stopped the crying when I put things in that perspective.  But to my son when we were driving home, I said this.   Never let your opponent see you weak, don't ever make them feel stronger by you showing weakness, always compete at the top of your game, win or lose, because in the end, they respecting you is all that matters.  In baseball, all his teammates, competitors and coaches always remarked that he had the most game face of anyone they ever played with.  

He never got too high or too low with himself, he always played the game right, was at the right play at the right time, always in control.  These traits served him well in golf and life.  He never threw a club,never pounded the driver or slammed his putter, he never got upset or angry with himself.  Kids would wonder why after every shot he was cleaning his clubs and kept them spotless, he would tell them that, my dad resells my clubs on ebay and buys me new ones for me so I keep the value up.

After his 1st couple of tournament years I stopped keeping track of his score.  Instead I focused on his swing, where his shots were landing, consistencies and inconsistencies.  I kept analyzing his equipment, shaft flex.  I once told him, that since he was growing stronger and stronger I just needed to stay ahead of the growth spurts and changes.  That I realized long ago that he had his own fundamental swing and when bad shots would happen, it wasn't because he wasn't trying, but because he was outgrowing his equipment.  My favorite saying for him was, I realize that it's not because you suddenly got stupid with your shots.

So my role became more of a pit crew.  Having the next equipment ready for his ever changing size and power.  At the start of the high school golf season, his teammate and best friend asked him who his fitter was for his equipment.  He laughed and said, I never went to a fitter, my dad would just hand me a different set of irons, or shaft or club that he buys off ebay.

When he has bad shots, I'll simply ask him later about the situation and he always gives me a really rational answer about his thought process and what he was trying to accomplish.  When he hits great shots, like ones that are tap ins, I'll say something silly like, maybe a little inch over and you don't have to putt!

I've ridden in golf carts with a dad who agonizes that he's spending a fortune in lessons, equipment,etc. and is upset because he feels his son is regressing, even though the boy shoots in the 70s, and who capped it off with at this rate, he won't be able to turn pro.  Maybe my expectations are too modest, I just want him to enjoy the sport and maybe play in college.

I've seen dads that yell at their kid on every mis-shot or heard kids say to my son and others, that they are glad their dad wasn't there.  We've even seen a dad go ballistic and rolling down a hill wrestling his son yelling and fighting over a missed golf shot.

Last week my son won his high school league championship and also was acknowledged as the Golfer of the Year in his high school league for having the best differential scoring average.  Its been a long road, the most rewarding part is in seeing him and his brother grow to be confident in what they do and excel in their endeavors.  Sometimes boys flourish when their dad gets out of their way or in my case, realize our role is to be support staff.

Edited by jollysammy, 06 May 2017 - 08:06 AM.


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#66 jollysammy

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 08:09 AM

Another example of when the moment can get the best of us.  I was a head coach of a AA LL team.  During a game, my assistant coach came up to me and said, why do we have this lineup out there, its like you don't want to win?

My AA team consisted of 7-9 year olds.

He was pretty upset that we might blow the game.

And then I said to him,

I'm not going to ask  _______ Williams, to sit on the bench 2 innings in a row.  I'll never ask any boy to do that, no matter what the situation,  I know I don't seem to care about the outcome of the game, but I care about the outcome of all their futures.  And asking what seems to be the weakest guy on the team to sit it out says I don't trust him to help the team.

He later called me the next morning and apologized saying he realized later that what he asked me to do is not what youth sports is all about.  I told him, yes, I might not be the best strategist out there, and truth be told, my son knew much more about how to play the game than I did, but my credo was always make sure that every boy wanted to come back the next year, and win or lose, that was my job.

In the heat of the moment, when winning becomes everything, it is easy to sacrifice long term goals for short term success.  This is probably more true for us Dads than anything.  

All I know back then was that kid was never going to be the strongest player on my team that year but he always gave me everything he had, got on first a lot by sheer effort.  How could I tell him he wasn't good enough to be out on the field.

I always thought that coaching kids was like raising crops.  You tend to their needs, feed them with whatever knowledge you have, don't overwater them with demands or unrealistic expectations. Put them in a position to have success at what they do.  Not all will succeed to the same level within the time period you have together, maybe they blossom later on some other team, some other coach.  But they won't do that if they quit.

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#67 JimDiGritz

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 09:29 AM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 28 February 2017 - 10:27 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 28 February 2017 - 09:58 AM, said:

Reading these reminds me of my son.  He gets very hard on himself on the course.  Its the only thing I really try to correct anymore.  He is 12 now but when he was 10, he played in the local association 13 and under championship.  He played 9 holes of stroke play qualifying and made the second flight of 16.  He won 3 9 hole matches and then had the 18 hole final against a 13 year old who normally would have made the 1st flight but played really poorly in qualifying.  My son really liked this other boy and went in to the match with a nothing to lose attitude.  Before you know it, my son was playing great and winning the match.  He got up and down so many times and the other kid was getting really frustrated.  He is 3 up with 4 to play and misses a 3 footer to end the match on 15.  Still 3 up with 3 to play.  His opponent birdies 16 to extend the match and my son starts balling.  Full on tears.  Even the other kids dad tried to calm him down.  The 17th hole was a long par 5 that my son had not made par on all week.  Advantage to the 13 year old.  In addition, there was a huge pond right of the fairway in the landing area, and my son's miss with driver was always right.  I was thinking that this was not going to end well.  I could see my son wiping tears off of his cheek as he was over the ball.  To his credit, he gutted one right down the middle, made par on the hole and won the match 3 and 1.  I was really impressed that he was able to get himself under control.  So going forward, while I try to help him prevent losing his cool, I also focus on the ability to regroup and move on since getting upset seems almost unavoidable at this age.

I am in the same exact boat.  Funny thing is, mine is better mentally when I am not caddying than when I am.  I think part of it is kids not wanting to disappoint their parents.  I honestly could care less what he shoots.  I just enjoy watching mine play and have fun.  I hate caddying because it is stressful when he is moody.  I would much rather be on the sideline with my headphones in listening to music.

I'm pretty much in agreement with heavy_hitter here. I often caddy for my 11 year old in club comps (he hasn't been to a tournament where parents aren't allowed to caddy, yet)

The only time I get 'mad' at him is the rare occasions when he displays immature behavior such as sulking, or beating himself up after a poor hole etc.

Since I personally know next to nothing about golf I rarely give game advice, however I do occasionally ask him to explain his thinking on club/shot choice just to get him thinking.

I'll keep caddying until he asks me not to, hopefully we'll find a good balance of sharing golf time together and him being independent.

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#68 Palmetto Golfer

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 04:36 PM

View PostJimDiGritz, on 14 July 2017 - 09:29 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 28 February 2017 - 10:27 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 28 February 2017 - 09:58 AM, said:

Reading these reminds me of my son.  He gets very hard on himself on the course.  Its the only thing I really try to correct anymore.  He is 12 now but when he was 10, he played in the local association 13 and under championship.  He played 9 holes of stroke play qualifying and made the second flight of 16.  He won 3 9 hole matches and then had the 18 hole final against a 13 year old who normally would have made the 1st flight but played really poorly in qualifying.  My son really liked this other boy and went in to the match with a nothing to lose attitude.  Before you know it, my son was playing great and winning the match.  He got up and down so many times and the other kid was getting really frustrated.  He is 3 up with 4 to play and misses a 3 footer to end the match on 15.  Still 3 up with 3 to play.  His opponent birdies 16 to extend the match and my son starts balling.  Full on tears.  Even the other kids dad tried to calm him down.  The 17th hole was a long par 5 that my son had not made par on all week.  Advantage to the 13 year old.  In addition, there was a huge pond right of the fairway in the landing area, and my son's miss with driver was always right.  I was thinking that this was not going to end well.  I could see my son wiping tears off of his cheek as he was over the ball.  To his credit, he gutted one right down the middle, made par on the hole and won the match 3 and 1.  I was really impressed that he was able to get himself under control.  So going forward, while I try to help him prevent losing his cool, I also focus on the ability to regroup and move on since getting upset seems almost unavoidable at this age.

I am in the same exact boat.  Funny thing is, mine is better mentally when I am not caddying than when I am.  I think part of it is kids not wanting to disappoint their parents.  I honestly could care less what he shoots.  I just enjoy watching mine play and have fun.  I hate caddying because it is stressful when he is moody.  I would much rather be on the sideline with my headphones in listening to music.

I'm pretty much in agreement with heavy_hitter here. I often caddy for my 11 year old in club comps (he hasn't been to a tournament where parents aren't allowed to caddy, yet)

The only time I get 'mad' at him is the rare occasions when he displays immature behavior such as sulking, or beating himself up after a poor hole etc.

Since I personally know next to nothing about golf I rarely give game advice, however I do occasionally ask him to explain his thinking on club/shot choice just to get him thinking.

I'll keep caddying until he asks me not to, hopefully we'll find a good balance of sharing golf time together and him being independent.

My personal favorite is watching from the sidelines. It is even better if I can stand ahead and watch the ball fly towards me.

When I do caddie, I have started to like it more and more.  Mainly b/c I can finally take on the role of a true caddie and not a daddy.  He makes 99% of the decisions.  I only do a couple of things. I will occasionally peek behind him to check his alignment.  He has trouble with that from time to time. If his alignment is off I will tell him after the shot.  I have only called him off a few times when he was aligned to the middle of a pond!!  And I occasionally give advice on club selection.  If he takes my advice great and if he doesn't that is great as well. I will agree with him and make him feel confident in that choice. It has taken awhile to get to this point but it is the best thing for him and our relationship.

I personally can't stand dad's that aligns the kid on every shot. I get a chuckle when the kid is on the tee and the dad says "a little left"...the kid moves a fraction of an inch left and the dad says "Good!". Seriously???  That fraction of an inch is going to make a difference with a driver? All you have down is broken the rhythm of your kid.

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#69 propredicr

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 05:58 PM

Our three leagues don't allow spectators or caddies for 9-10 yo.  They walk the 18 holes by themselves.  

Just got back from IMG World and had the opportunity to caddy for my kid. Honestly, I prefer and he prefers to be out there by himself.   Only thing I did was handle the clubs.  He doesn't have me for his regular tourneys, so, he makes his own decisions and learns to take responsibility for them.  He had 27,31,31 putts, so it seems he can read greens decently and doesn't need my input.

Based on what I saw from these top flight kids, is their caddies lined them up for everything;  tee shots, all they way up to putts.   Not sure how that will help the kids in the long run?   I saw my kid aligned too far left/right more than a couple times and his ball ended up accordingly, in the junk/bunker.  At least he couldn't blame me🤣!

My feeling is at 9-10, a trophy is a nice to have and provides great memories.   Although, probably won't mean much when they reach 13-18 yo competition.  Am I wrong in my assessment?

Edited by propredicr, 14 July 2017 - 06:15 PM.


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#70 Palmetto Golfer

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 06:30 PM

View Postpropredicr, on 14 July 2017 - 05:58 PM, said:

Our three leagues don't allow spectators or caddies for 9-10 yo.  They walk the 18 holes by themselves.  

Just got back from IMG World and had the opportunity to caddy for my kid. Honestly, I prefer and he prefers to be out there by himself.   Only thing I did was handle the clubs.  He doesn't have me for his regular tourneys, so, he makes his own decisions and learns to take responsibility for them.  He had 27,31,31 putts, so it seems he can read greens decently and doesn't need my input.

Based on what I saw from these top flight kids, is their caddies lined them up for everything;  tee shots, all they way up to putts.   Not sure how that will help the kids in the long run?   I saw my kid aligned too far left/right more than a couple times and his ball ended up accordingly, in the junk/bunker.  At least he couldn't blame me��!

My feeling is at 9-10, a trophy is a nice to have and provides great memories.   Although, probably won't mean much when they reach 13-18 yo competition.  Am I wrong in my assessment?

In my opinion, you are doing the right thing.  Bobby Jones said he never learned anything from a tournament he won.  You learn so much faster by making your own mistakes.  The goal is not to be the best 10 y/o golfer.  Keep doing what you are doing.  I know my son reads greens 1000x better than I do. You know why???? b/c he has been doing it on his own the past 4 years.  How are the kids whose dad's line them up every putt going to learn when daddy can't be there?

Besides, I think the kids whose dads line everything up don't have as much fun.  They end up pouting or arguing with their dad at some point.  The heck with that.


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#71 OffTheDole

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:29 PM

View Postjollysammy, on 07 May 2017 - 08:09 AM, said:

I always thought that coaching kids was like raising crops.  You tend to their needs, feed them with whatever knowledge you have, don't overwater them with demands or unrealistic expectations. Put them in a position to have success at what they do.  Not all will succeed to the same level within the time period you have together, maybe they blossom later on some other team, some other coach.  But they won't do that if they quit.

Great stuff. It'd be a real benefit to most kids out there if the coaches and parents had this kind of attitude!

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#72 JimDiGritz

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 01:58 PM

View PostPalmetto Golfer, on 14 July 2017 - 04:36 PM, said:

View PostJimDiGritz, on 14 July 2017 - 09:29 AM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 28 February 2017 - 10:27 AM, said:

View PostNoles, on 28 February 2017 - 09:58 AM, said:

Reading these reminds me of my son.  He gets very hard on himself on the course.  Its the only thing I really try to correct anymore.  He is 12 now but when he was 10, he played in the local association 13 and under championship.  He played 9 holes of stroke play qualifying and made the second flight of 16.  He won 3 9 hole matches and then had the 18 hole final against a 13 year old who normally would have made the 1st flight but played really poorly in qualifying.  My son really liked this other boy and went in to the match with a nothing to lose attitude.  Before you know it, my son was playing great and winning the match.  He got up and down so many times and the other kid was getting really frustrated.  He is 3 up with 4 to play and misses a 3 footer to end the match on 15.  Still 3 up with 3 to play.  His opponent birdies 16 to extend the match and my son starts balling.  Full on tears.  Even the other kids dad tried to calm him down.  The 17th hole was a long par 5 that my son had not made par on all week.  Advantage to the 13 year old.  In addition, there was a huge pond right of the fairway in the landing area, and my son's miss with driver was always right.  I was thinking that this was not going to end well.  I could see my son wiping tears off of his cheek as he was over the ball.  To his credit, he gutted one right down the middle, made par on the hole and won the match 3 and 1.  I was really impressed that he was able to get himself under control.  So going forward, while I try to help him prevent losing his cool, I also focus on the ability to regroup and move on since getting upset seems almost unavoidable at this age.

I am in the same exact boat.  Funny thing is, mine is better mentally when I am not caddying than when I am.  I think part of it is kids not wanting to disappoint their parents.  I honestly could care less what he shoots.  I just enjoy watching mine play and have fun.  I hate caddying because it is stressful when he is moody.  I would much rather be on the sideline with my headphones in listening to music.

I'm pretty much in agreement with heavy_hitter here. I often caddy for my 11 year old in club comps (he hasn't been to a tournament where parents aren't allowed to caddy, yet)

The only time I get 'mad' at him is the rare occasions when he displays immature behavior such as sulking, or beating himself up after a poor hole etc.

Since I personally know next to nothing about golf I rarely give game advice, however I do occasionally ask him to explain his thinking on club/shot choice just to get him thinking.

I'll keep caddying until he asks me not to, hopefully we'll find a good balance of sharing golf time together and him being independent.

My personal favorite is watching from the sidelines. It is even better if I can stand ahead and watch the ball fly towards me.

When I do caddie, I have started to like it more and more.  Mainly b/c I can finally take on the role of a true caddie and not a daddy.  He makes 99% of the decisions.  I only do a couple of things. I will occasionally peek behind him to check his alignment.  He has trouble with that from time to time. If his alignment is off I will tell him after the shot.  I have only called him off a few times when he was aligned to the middle of a pond!!  And I occasionally give advice on club selection.  If he takes my advice great and if he doesn't that is great as well. I will agree with him and make him feel confident in that choice. It has taken awhile to get to this point but it is the best thing for him and our relationship.

I personally can't stand dad's that aligns the kid on every shot. I get a chuckle when the kid is on the tee and the dad says "a little left"...the kid moves a fraction of an inch left and the dad says "Good!". Seriously???  That fraction of an inch is going to make a difference with a driver? All you have down is broken the rhythm of your kid.

Before anyone thinks I'm being sanctimonious, I've made all of the above mistakes and will probably still make them on occasion. I've criticized my sons choice of club and shook my head when he duffed it and have made micro alignment suggestions that were clearly unhelpful.

Just as my son is striving to be a better golfer I'm striving to be a better dad and being a caddie is a skill in it's own right...

I enjoy watching my son hit a sweet chip onto the green, I just need to smile and support him when he duffs the odd shot!

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#73 leojax

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 09:32 PM

Lots of good advice in this thread. I have two boys under 10 who are playing a fair amount.

Most of their competitive experience is match play, and their leagues play 4-5 person teams

Coaching others children in golf has been a good learning experience for me in coaching them better.

You get better context for you own kid's improvement.

And if you wouldn't do something on the range or course with someone else's kid, hard to justify it with yours.



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#74 heavy_hitter

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 11:25 AM

Had a dad caddying for his kid this weekend in a tournament where caddies weren't allowed.  The kid is a very nice boy, but he isn't that talented.  I knew there was going to be a problem with dad as soon as I saw the pairings.  Dad was hooked to his son's hip every shot and was constantly walking within 5 to 10 yards of him.  I knew what was going on.  Didn't know what the conversations were because I did my usual thing and went up the fairway where the kids balls would land.  On number 8 he keeps getting closer and closer and on the tee box he started to have a conversation with the kid.  This prompted me on number 9 to stay back and observe at the tee box.  It was a very wet day and his ensuing tee shot the club went further than the ball.  At this time the rain started to come down a little harder.  Now in Florida we are used to this.  When the course has absorbed too much rain they will sound the horn for stoppage just the same with lightning.  The other two boy's hit outstanding drives.  The dad in question walks over to his kid, stands under his umbrella and will not allow him to advance to his ball.  I am sitting back watching this entire thing happen.  He tells his son not to hit the ball.  I finally pipe up and tell the dad that he needs to play.  The dad fires back "It is too wet and his clubs are slippery.".  I told him it is not his job to determine how wet it is and when to stop playing.  The other kids are having to deal with it as well.  I then told him he was to be 50 yards away from the kid and not talking to him.  He then slowly proceeds to push his kids cart over to the ball for him while talking the entire time.  This took about 10 minutes and the other two boy's were ready to play.  They were waiting and waiting for this kid to play and the father would not let him.  Finally, the horn did blow.  Had a conversation the the tournament director and he did talk to the dad.  This kind of stuff just ruins it for the spectators and the other players.

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#75 tiger1873

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 04:01 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 October 2017 - 11:25 AM, said:

Had a dad caddying for his kid this weekend in a tournament where caddies weren't allowed.  The kid is a very nice boy, but he isn't that talented.  I knew there was going to be a problem with dad as soon as I saw the pairings.  Dad was hooked to his son's hip every shot and was constantly walking within 5 to 10 yards of him.  I knew what was going on.  Didn't know what the conversations were because I did my usual thing and went up the fairway where the kids balls would land.  On number 8 he keeps getting closer and closer and on the tee box he started to have a conversation with the kid.  This prompted me on number 9 to stay back and observe at the tee box.  It was a very wet day and his ensuing tee shot the club went further than the ball.  At this time the rain started to come down a little harder.  Now in Florida we are used to this.  When the course has absorbed too much rain they will sound the horn for stoppage just the same with lightning.  The other two boy's hit outstanding drives.  The dad in question walks over to his kid, stands under his umbrella and will not allow him to advance to his ball.  I am sitting back watching this entire thing happen.  He tells his son not to hit the ball.  I finally pipe up and tell the dad that he needs to play.  The dad fires back "It is too wet and his clubs are slippery.".  I told him it is not his job to determine how wet it is and when to stop playing.  The other kids are having to deal with it as well.  I then told him he was to be 50 yards away from the kid and not talking to him.  He then slowly proceeds to push his kids cart over to the ball for him while talking the entire time.  This took about 10 minutes and the other two boy's were ready to play.  They were waiting and waiting for this kid to play and the father would not let him.  Finally, the horn did blow.  Had a conversation the the tournament director and he did talk to the dad.  This kind of stuff just ruins it for the spectators and the other players.

I hope they threaten to DQ  if they didnít already.  I wish more tournaments would not allow caddies for younger kids.  It would make it a lot more fun for tournaments.



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#76 heavy_hitter

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 04:04 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 30 October 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

View Postheavy_hitter, on 30 October 2017 - 11:25 AM, said:

Had a dad caddying for his kid this weekend in a tournament where caddies weren't allowed.  The kid is a very nice boy, but he isn't that talented.  I knew there was going to be a problem with dad as soon as I saw the pairings.  Dad was hooked to his son's hip every shot and was constantly walking within 5 to 10 yards of him.  I knew what was going on.  Didn't know what the conversations were because I did my usual thing and went up the fairway where the kids balls would land.  On number 8 he keeps getting closer and closer and on the tee box he started to have a conversation with the kid.  This prompted me on number 9 to stay back and observe at the tee box.  It was a very wet day and his ensuing tee shot the club went further than the ball.  At this time the rain started to come down a little harder.  Now in Florida we are used to this.  When the course has absorbed too much rain they will sound the horn for stoppage just the same with lightning.  The other two boy's hit outstanding drives.  The dad in question walks over to his kid, stands under his umbrella and will not allow him to advance to his ball.  I am sitting back watching this entire thing happen.  He tells his son not to hit the ball.  I finally pipe up and tell the dad that he needs to play.  The dad fires back "It is too wet and his clubs are slippery.".  I told him it is not his job to determine how wet it is and when to stop playing.  The other kids are having to deal with it as well.  I then told him he was to be 50 yards away from the kid and not talking to him.  He then slowly proceeds to push his kids cart over to the ball for him while talking the entire time.  This took about 10 minutes and the other two boy's were ready to play.  They were waiting and waiting for this kid to play and the father would not let him.  Finally, the horn did blow.  Had a conversation the the tournament director and he did talk to the dad.  This kind of stuff just ruins it for the spectators and the other players.

I hope they threaten to DQ  if they didn't already.  I wish more tournaments would not allow caddies for younger kids.  It would make it a lot more fun for tournaments.

The tournament ended up being washed out and cancelled.  I wasn't privy to the conversation between the director and parent.

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#77 Sean2

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Posted 30 October 2017 - 04:18 PM

I caddied for a girl playing in the US Junior Girls qualifier (she was the medalist and is now on the LPGA Tour). Her father always caddied for her, but in the US Junior Girls, no parents are allowed to caddy. They had a few situations where parents went ballistic.
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