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Best way for Juniors to lower scores.


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#1 tiger1873

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 02:57 PM

My Daughter (she is 9) just aged up in Tournaments so she can play longer distances and 18 holes.  She is scoring about 100 right now in tournaments.  I would say the new distance is about the women tee's.  I was hesitant to do this but after playing a few tournaments she is much happier with added competition.

I am trying to figure out the best way I can work with her to lower her scores.  The areas I am thinking are best ways to lower her score.

1. Work on her putting so she can go a round with 2 putts or less.  She pretty good about never going over 3 putts anymore.


2. Work on getting here driving distance longer. I am pretty sure that her biggest disadvantage right now with the older girls who are 12. There score has been about 20 points less but I think they driving an 30 or 40 yards which means there able to hit the greens on the 2 or 3 shot instead  of 3 or 4.

I know as she gets older it's going to go be able to drive farther as she gets older but is there any drills or exercises she can do to help her.  

I know there is other areas we need to work on but I counted about 25 strokes in those two areas in the last couple of tournaments so it seems like a good place to start.

Some of the kids are also using long shafts to get more distance which I don't think is the best.  She could get a longer driver based on the US Kids height but I am reluctant to go more. I was told shorter clubs are better. I have been changing them when she's goes up 2 levels.

Edited by tiger1873, 01 November 2016 - 02:59 PM.


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#2 DavePelz4

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 03:40 PM

Have her fall in love with putting and the short game.  If she can convert putts inside of 6 feet half the time, she's on her way to better scores.

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#3 agatha

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 10:21 PM

Please don't take this the wrong way as I am not trying to make any assumptions just sharing my thoughts from observations over the years.  I think you might want to get her a swing coach to help her develop the skills in the proper progression to improve, remove yourself from that role and be "dad".     You can be part of team "insert her name here" but being in a more supporting role rather than in charge could go a long way in that father/daughter relationship.
It might not seem that big of a deal now but have seen too many daughters with daddy caddies or coaches that turns sour and I think you could enjoy it a whole lot more as the support and find her the people and tools she needs to get where she wants to go.   Hope this made sense..

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#4 reborod

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Posted 01 November 2016 - 11:55 PM

I agree with the above poster.  Find her a great golf coach.  You be the dad...play golf alongside her, drive her to lessons, be supportive.  Take her to milkshakes after the round, etc.  I'd probably go to US Kids golf and see the lengths and color codes they recommend and work from there. A improperly weighted club can mess up a swing.

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#5 Kenny Lee Puckett

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 02:34 AM

a +1 on some of what's been said here, but as one who has played more tournament golf than most ever will in a lifetime my advice to you is this ... you just keep being dad, and she's too young for serious instruction. at this point don't become the impatient parent who has to put everything golf related on some "adult" level of expectations. she's 9. take her to the course when she's 10, and 11, and 12... take her everyday she wants to go. gently push her on nice days when you both have time but she doesn't. takes breaks from it, let her miss it. keep score but make the great shots she hits during the round the things you talk about on the ride home. only time will tell how it all turns out. her future path will reveal itself, IN THE FUTURE. hope you keep the love of the game alive in her to still want to be going at 13, and 14... then find a teacher and start refining things getting her ready for high school.

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#6 heavy_hitter

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 08:31 AM

I agree with the previous posters.  My daughter didn't even start playing golf until she was 12 and is going to a D1 program next year.  The best thing that happened for her was when I got her a coach at 15 and got out of the way.  

With that said, the best things for juniors to work on:

1.  Putting.  You will never eliminate three putts.  However, you need to spend 75% of your time 6 feet and in.  If you can make that putt and KNOW you can make that putt it makes putting easier.  I see dads (I have a younger son that plays as well) all the time get on their kid for running a putt by 4-6 ft.  They didn't mean to run it by, no reason to get on them about it.  If they spend the majority of the time working on putts 6 ft and in they know they can step up and make.  Once they know they can make that putt, they are a different golfer.

2.  Wedge Game.  To me this is the most important part of the game.  I have seen it change my daughters scores from a mid to high 70's golfer to a low and better than par golfer.  This is what her coach stressed more than anything else.  Grooving your swing with a wedge teaches you accuracy through the entire bag.  It puts you closer to pins and on greens.  If you aren't hitting greens you can't scor

3.  Short Game.  Chipping and pitching.  Goal is to get the ball inside of 6ft.  From watching and experiencing junior golf, the most important aspect is having an understanding of what club to chip with around the greens.  See to many kids naturally take out a SW because they see a pro do it.  A pro is a pro and using a wedge around the green is difficult.  Put it in the bag and let teach them to chip 7i-PW to get the ball rolling on the green.

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#7 tiger1873

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 11:19 AM

I am pretty much just try to be her Dad and support her.  She has a swing coach and for the most part I let them teach her and do not get in the way. One of the reason I asking the question is I want to make sure I am putting her on the right track.

She already a great chipper that is actually her strong point.  It why she can score as low as she can at her age. She is the only person who I know who can watch a Youtube video of Phil Michelson and within 5 minutes have the shot down pat.   Her Swing is also really good. It was from Day one with her. When we first got her lessons the coach thought she been taking lessons.  She actually really loves golf more then me and wants to actually practice  too much.  After her first golf lesson when she was 7 she told us  since she would rather golf then take dance lessons. It's actually her love of the game that drives me to want to help her.

The fact she can chip so well  isn't always good because she wants to show off too much with her chipping  abilities.  Both me and her coach has to tell her that sometimes it's better to putt from the fringe then chip.

Most the extra strokes she is taking right now is because she is not hitting the greens in regulation at about 350 to 400 yards. She drives about 140-150 and then takes a fairway about another 100-110 yards. The reason she is playing this size course is at tournaments for girls her age a lot of times tee off at really small yardage and play par 3 courses.  She complained to me that they are not real courses and the lower distance on some par 3 courses means in some cases she was hitting a wedge off the tee. That was the cue to me she needed to play longer.

At these longer distances she has to use her fairway 2 times and then usually hit a wedge in. If she can hit another 20-30 yards of the driver there is a good chance she could save 1 stroke a hole. If there 14 par 4 or more holes that 14 stokes right there.  I have seen a lot advice on how to help build club head speed but there all for adults. Not sure the best way for junior golfers to do it.

Edited by tiger1873, 02 November 2016 - 11:30 AM.


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#8 heavy_hitter

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 01:53 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 02 November 2016 - 11:19 AM, said:



Most the extra strokes she is taking right now is because she is not hitting the greens in regulation at about 350 to 400 yards. She drives about 140-150 and then takes a fairway about another 100-110 yards. The reason she is playing this size course is at tournaments for girls her age a lot of times tee off at really small yardage and play par 3 courses.  She complained to me that they are not real courses and the lower distance on some par 3 courses means in some cases she was hitting a wedge off the tee. That was the cue to me she needed to play longer.

At these longer distances she has to use her fairway 2 times and then usually hit a wedge in. If she can hit another 20-30 yards of the driver there is a good chance she could save 1 stroke a hole. If there 14 par 4 or more holes that 14 stokes right there.  I have seen a lot advice on how to help build club head speed but there all for adults. Not sure the best way for junior golfers to do it.

She shouldn't be playing from the longer distances.  Doesn't matter how she feels in that regards.  She should be playing age appropriate distances.  If she can't shoot even par from them, she shouldn't move up.  There is no reason for her to be playing a 350 yard - 400 yard par 4 at that age unless she can be on in two with driver then hybrid or long iron.

Locally, my son is better than everyone.  When 8, I moved him up into the 10-12 year old age division for the local tour.  Out of 7 tournaments that summer he won 6.  The next summer I wanted to move him up again and the director talked me out of it.  He told me until he can shoot around par from the distances he was playing there was no reason to move up.  Best decision I made was to leave him down.  There is nothing wrong with being the big fish in a small pond.  Success breeds confidence.

Back to my original statement.  She needs to play age appropriate distances and when she can shoot around par, then she needs to move up.  Here is what US Kids uses as appropriate distances from fairway tees.

http://www.uskidsgol...al/course-setup
http://www.uskidsgol...ps-and-yardages

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#9 tiger1873

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 08:33 PM

I don't agree that she should not be playing shorter distances  she actually has pared most of her par 5s in tournament play.  The yardage you reference is only 1500 yards. At most of those distances she has to use a pitch or wedge on the tee. A lot of these tournaments are great to start. It give a false sense of skill. I seen a fair number of players roll the ball 60 yards for a par or get lucky with a putt in the fairway and end up with birdie.


Looking back at results in years past the girls that won when they were 8 and 9 ar nowhere to be found now or not doing well. At this age tournaments are about learning the game under pressure.  You can practice all you want but there is nothing like playing a tounament where you need to count every stroke.  I view it as a marathon I don't care about her winning at 9.  Long term I care about her getting consistent scores and using tournaments as guide to where she is at.

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#10 GolfDad14

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Posted 02 November 2016 - 10:40 PM

My son is still pre growth spurt 5'4" at 13 years old with a 5.4 Handicap and now able to score from the tips at our very difficult CC. His length was bred from a combination strength and speed from playing lots of Dixie Youth Baseball, getting longer extension in his golf swing, and having a driver with high enough loft and correct shaft for SS. As for playing yardages, best advice for long run is never play the same tee box twice. Playing the same yardages over and over only create a limited memory of what it requires to shoot well from those yardages. She will become a more dynamic player and have a higher golf IQ playing different shot selections and ultimately become a better player because her favorite shot will be the next one 👍


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#11 heavy_hitter

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 08:07 AM

View Posttiger1873, on 02 November 2016 - 08:33 PM, said:

I don't agree that she should not be playing shorter distances  she actually has pared most of her par 5s in tournament play.  The yardage you reference is only 1500 yards. At most of those distances she has to use a pitch or wedge on the tee. A lot of these tournaments are great to start. It give a false sense of skill. I seen a fair number of players roll the ball 60 yards for a par or get lucky with a putt in the fairway and end up with birdie.


Looking back at results in years past the girls that won when they were 8 and 9 ar nowhere to be found now or not doing well. At this age tournaments are about learning the game under pressure.  You can practice all you want but there is nothing like playing a tounament where you need to count every stroke.  I view it as a marathon I don't care about her winning at 9.  Long term I care about her getting consistent scores and using tournaments as guide to where she is at.

Really?  

Lexi Thompson 2003 and 2004 US Kids World Champion at 8 and 9.  I think that is somebody.

A few of the other names I recognized right off the bat.
Lydia Gumm FSU
Shannon Aubert Stanford
Mariah Stackhouse Stanford

These are just a few of the names I recognized that played US Kids and played from these distances.

Girl's 9 play 2100 on 9 holes at the World Championships.  

If your future goal is for her to get into college with it, you have to teach her how to win.  If she was shooting in the 70's from the distances she is playing and winning, by all means stick to those distances.  Look up Alexa Pano.  One of the greatest female junior golfers ever.  She played US kids and she was shooting in the 70's from 5500 yards when she was 9 and 10 years old.  Doesn't matter if she was using Driver and Pitching wedge.  Alexa and the better golfers were using Driver and Putter from those US Kids distances. Alexa could have moved up to the 16-18 year old division at that age and could have competed, but she didn't.  It did one thing for them, teach them how to score and win.

You can always practice from longer distances.  But in tournaments at that age you are trying to win and trying to score.

Tiger Woods Dad didn't like moving him up age divisions for this very reason.  Earl also made Tiger play from the women's tee once a week growing up in his young teen years to learn how to score.  Why?  Because if you don't learn how to score you will never know how to score.  Especially, in tournament golf.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 03 November 2016 - 08:08 AM.


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#12 heavy_hitter

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 08:59 AM

View PostGolfDad14, on 02 November 2016 - 10:40 PM, said:

My son is still pre growth spurt 5'4" at 13 years old with a 5.4 Handicap and now able to score from the tips at our very difficult CC. His length was bred from a combination strength and speed from playing lots of Dixie Youth Baseball, getting longer extension in his golf swing, and having a driver with high enough loft and correct shaft for SS. As for playing yardages, best advice for long run is never play the same tee box twice. Playing the same yardages over and over only create a limited memory of what it requires to shoot well from those yardages. She will become a more dynamic player and have a higher golf IQ playing different shot selections and ultimately become a better player because her favorite shot will be the next one ��

This is very true for practice.  For tournament play they should play their age group.

Saying that a kid plays from the tips is very misleading.  My daughter can play from the tips at one of the clubs in town and shoot par.  It is only 6400 yards.  She can play from the tips at 7000 yards at another club and will be around 80.

When practicing you should definitely play different yardages.  My coach has both my kids a couple times a month go play 9 holes from ladies tees on par 3's. 150 yard marker on par 4's and 250 yard marker on par 5's.  Guess what, it teaches them how to score.  If you can't shoot even par or better from her you can't do it from tees further back.

Rule of thumb, if they won't have a chance to win a tournament playing from the longer tees, there is no reason to move them up.  When my son was 10 I moved him up to the 11 year old division in a regional event.  He shot a 78 and won.  It played 500 yards longer than the 10 year old division.  I could have moved him up to the 13 year old division to play at 5800 yards and he would have shot in the 80's and won.  Wouldn't have done him any good.  He would have been frustrated all day as well he would have been out of his social element.

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#13 agatha

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 09:02 AM

Not sure if this is helpful but with our son we kept him in correct age group but once he would get to where it was not competitive enough we found other options where he would be playing against better players so he was constantly challenged.  We had a lot of options in Calif however so it was not too difficult to continually move him up a natural progression of competitive play.

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#14 nikegal

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 10:18 AM

As one whos junior golfers number 60% of my students, I wholeheartedly agree with Agatha, Kirbs and HH. Agatha as a parent of a Professional golfer, and at your daughter's age it makes no difference if they are a boy or a girl and Kirbs and HH speak not only as parents but as Players, having "been there done that" as Richard would say. On one hand you say that you want to be her father and support her and in the next sentence you state that "I want to make sure that I put her on the right track."

First, it is not for you to determine her "track." If you have a quality junior Teacher this should have been discussed and left for he/her to decide with your input.

Second, unless the child has mentioned being "bored" or something of that nature, and very very very rarely will a 9-10yo say unprompted by an elder, "gee dad, I'm winning too easily and by too much and want to move up against the older kids." it doesn't work that way in 99% of the cases. Though I do not usually take a student under the age of 10yo for one-one lessons, and then only after speaking to the child and both parents, those juniors that play competitively I watch very closely, both on the course in tourneys, on the practice line and in our lesson to observe any changes that would indicate "boredom" and then I will speak to the child. A child complaint about not playing "real" courses has not been properly indoctrinated into the objectives of this game, the best way to achieve them and what the very best have done to achieve them. If she is not winning every other tournament and placing no lower than 2nd-3rd, then she is not too good to be at her present age group and if he/she is, and I have had these types of children, they should play through their age group(say a 9yo in 9-10yo group) and rack up wins, build a mental bank of success and deal with the pressure of Playing from the front, with expecctaions to win but I will say this right now- to state that at her age the goal of tournaments is to "learn the game under pressure" is terribly terribly misguided and this is just my professional opinion, potentially very harmful, not only to her future performance but also her psyche and love for the game.

The answer is to discuss with her these areas, not just take her at her word and move her back, move her up in age brackets or  to start playing games with her equipment. I don't even want to get into a discussion about this here though I will say that what you have posted so far is telling me that she is not getting the guidance from her Teacher.

With a child that young, their swing is two or three down the list in my concerns and areas that I concentrate on. #1, I start on the green with a putter and move back, wedge and 9i next and so on. I can teach anyone a swing through their bag with a short iron however I could very rarely if ever teach someone, child or adult, a swing through their whole bag with a driver or long iron in their hands.

You should be asking these questions of her teacher, not us. You may think that you are up just being her dad and there for support however your thoughts, statememts and  posts say otherwise. I wish you the best with your daughter :) Maddie

Edited by nikegal, 03 November 2016 - 11:58 AM.


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#15 Noles

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 10:53 AM

You can be Dad, and still give her suggestions on what to practice.  While her coach/pro will play a huge role in her development, you are the one that sees every shot and you can point out to her the shots that are making her scores go up.  Also, remember that your goals should really be long term ones.  Its about her being the best player she can be when she is older and fully grown.  Distance will come as she grows and develops, but learning how to score at the distance she hits it is a great lesson that will benefit her for as long as she plays.


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#16 tiger1873

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 01:29 PM

Not really a fan of US world tournaments after watching the short game. I think it can be good and has good golfers but I think as it has grown in popularity and some of the dads are just crazy. Longer term I there are other tournaments out there to play that makes more sense.

When your kids are golfing you need to be there and help guide them long term. Yes a pro can help but as Noles said I am there at every tournament and practice.  

I have been told by more then one person to get her to playing 18 hole tournament golf as soon as possible.  This is advice is from pro's as well as other dad's who have been down the path. Unless she wins when she gets older no one cares who won when they were 9.  To be honest she is not the only 9 year old that aged up most of her peers that can play already did it too. Where I am at it it very very competitive by the time she is 13 or 14 she will need to be under 75 to even place in the top 10.

Edited by tiger1873, 03 November 2016 - 02:49 PM.


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#17 heavy_hitter

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 03:18 PM

View Posttiger1873, on 03 November 2016 - 01:29 PM, said:

.

When your kids are golfing you need to be there and help guide them long term. Yes a pro can help but as Noles said I am there at every tournament and practice.  




Worst thing you can do is be there at every practice and every tournament.  Drop them off at practice then leave.  Go to the bar and have a drink.  Drop them off at a tournament from time to time and leave.

There are crazy parents at every sporting event.  Not just US Kids.  The best of the best play in the US Tournaments 12 and under.  A great way to gauge  where your kids are at.  In the short game, they are trying to sell you a show.  If the parent is normal, they weren't showing them for the most part.  Job is to get viewers.

Whoever gave you the advice to get them into 18 hole tournaments as soon as you can is wrong.  The win isn't what is important.  It is the instilling the value of knowing how to win and knowing that they have the ability to win that is important.  No one will remember the win accept her.  She will be the one that remembers.  Moving her up doesn't guarantee that she shoots under 75 to place in the top 10. But instilling winning and scoring will get her there.  Once she hits 6th grade is when she needs to be playing in two day 36 hole tournaments.  9 hole or 18 hole one day tournaments do not mean much.  I don't know where you live, but I can assure you that there aren't many 13-14 year old girls shooting under 75.  I just went to Junior Scoreboard and the 10th ranked girl in the class of 2021 has only 9 scores 75 and under out of 30.  There is no way the top 10 is finishing 75 and under.  I looked at AJGA and the top 10 aren't finishing 75 and under in those age groups.

Seems like you know what your doing with a 9 year old even though you haven't gone through the process.  I guess US Kids, Callaway World Junior, IMG, Little Peoples Championships, Junior Golf Championships are all wrong even though they all use about the same distances for those age groups.  I have been through the process with a daughter playing D1 golf.  

Good luck to your daughter.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 04 November 2016 - 08:20 AM.


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#18 Forged4ever

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Posted 03 November 2016 - 08:06 PM

View Postheavy_hitter, on 03 November 2016 - 03:18 PM, said:

View Posttiger1873, on 03 November 2016 - 01:29 PM, said:

.

When your kids are golfing you need to be there and help guide them long term. Yes a pro can help but as Noles said I am there at every tournament and practice.  




Worst thing you can do is be there at every practice and every tournament.  Drop them off at practice then leave.  Go to the bar and have a drink.  Drop them off at a tournament from time to time and leave.

There are crazy parents at every sporting event.  Not just US Kids.  The best of the best play in the US Tournaments 12 and under.  A great way to gauge  where your kids are at.  In the short game, they are trying to sell you a show.  If the parent is normal, they weren't showing them for the most part.  Job is to get viewers.

Whoever gave you the advice to get them into 18 hole tournaments as soon as you can is wrong.  The win isn't what is important.  It is the instilling the value of knowing how to win and knowing that they have the ability to win that is important.  No one will remember the win accept her.  She will be the one that remembers.  Moving her up doesn't guarantee that she shoots under 75 to place in the top 10. But instilling winning and scoring will get her there.  Once she hits 6th grade is when she needs to be playing in two day 36 hole tournaments.  9 hole or 18 hole one day tournaments do not mean much.  I don't know where you live, but I can assure you that there aren't many 13-14 year old girls shooting under 75.  I just went to Junior Scoreboard and the 10th ranked girl in the class of 2021 has only 9 scores 75 and under out of 30.  There is no way the top 10 is finishing 75 and under.  I looked at AJGA and the top 10 aren't finishing 75 and under in those age groups.

Seems like you know what your doing with a 9 year old even though you haven't gone through the process.  I guess US Kids, Callaway World Junior, IMG, Little Peoples Championships, Junior Golf Championships all use about the same distances for those age groups.  I have been through the process with a daughter playing D1 golf.  Good luck to her.
Great post Bro!!

You know people hear what they wanna hear, usually disregard the rest because they or their child is different and it does not apply to them.

Most Class A's don't even Teach lil children so their advice should be taken with a grain of salt, if its taken at all, and I think my feelings for Class A's is pretty well documented on the board. Three of the four most influential individuals in my life were/are Class A's(Maddie, Pete and Gary Ellis, the HP at my club from my 14th year through my 31st year) however most don't deal or Teach with Children.

That would be like taking your 9-12yo to a garden variety family doc when 98%+ of his/her patients are teenagers to adults.

I saw this up close and personal as a football coach and it is why I stopped coaching. The parents took all of the fun out of it and they had healthy little 10yo bois on supplements and vitamins. The fact that less than 1% of every HS kid who straps on a helmet ever runs onto a D1 field meant little to them and even if their child was one day going to be that 1%, to do the s*** that I saw to a 8-10yo was psychotic.

Wayyyyyyyy too many dads tryin to live through their boys.

I call it the "MMS," the "Marv Maronivich Syndrome," lol(Todd's dad).

In golf we have the "EWS," lmao

You know who I'm referring to, lol

Stay well my Friend :)

My Best,
Richard

Edited by Forged4ever, 03 November 2016 - 08:10 PM.

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#19 heavy_hitter

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 08:29 AM

I will add this as well.  There is a difference between a swing coach and a coach.  At 9 they need a coach that is going to teach them proper fundamentals and  someone that is going to spend more time showing them how to play the game.  That is more important for kids under 13 than teaching them how to swing. A kid's physical development over these years will change so much that the swing will keep evolving and changing with it anyway.  A coach teaches them how to play and is so important.  I see kids all the time that go see their swing coach, hit some range balls and then leave.  Kids with a lot of talent.that could be much better than they are.  But that coach isn't teaching them how to play.  At 9, they need to learn how to play.

Edited by heavy_hitter, 04 November 2016 - 08:34 AM.


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#20 Wardell Stone

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 11:44 AM

Gosh this is such a good thread I just wanted to bring it back to life. Lots of good advice and I can empathize with the OP as well. On one hand it's easy to get frustrated with our kids and on the other hand we have such pride in them we don't always want to listen to good advice from others. Really is a constant struggle. Thanks to all that contributed.

Edited by Wardell Stone, 07 September 2017 - 10:08 PM.

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#21 SkiSchoolPro

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 12:13 PM

View PostGolfDad14, on 02 November 2016 - 10:40 PM, said:

My son is still pre growth spurt 5'4" at 13 years old with a 5.4 Handicap and now able to score from the tips at our very difficult CC. His length was bred from a combination strength and speed from playing lots of Dixie Youth Baseball, getting longer extension in his golf swing, and having a driver with high enough loft and correct shaft for SS. As for playing yardages, best advice for long run is never play the same tee box twice. Playing the same yardages over and over only create a limited memory of what it requires to shoot well from those yardages. She will become a more dynamic player and have a higher golf IQ playing different shot selections and ultimately become a better player because her favorite shot will be the next one ��

I agree with the posters who emphasize mixing it up (short courses/easier comp to learn to score low and win as well as longer courses/tougher comp to be more challenged) but have quoted GolfDad14 as it seems to be the only post to mention playing another sport. While practicing golf is the quickest way to get good at golf, developing speed, strength, balance, etc. with other sports can increase upside and pay longer term dividends. I think it can also reduce the chance of getting burned out on golf. Guys like Nicklaus were good at other sports growing up and some of the most athletic and longest players on tour (like Gary Woodland) played other sports into college.

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#22 leezer99

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 12:46 PM

View PostSkiSchoolPro, on 05 September 2017 - 12:13 PM, said:

View PostGolfDad14, on 02 November 2016 - 10:40 PM, said:

My son is still pre growth spurt 5'4" at 13 years old with a 5.4 Handicap and now able to score from the tips at our very difficult CC. His length was bred from a combination strength and speed from playing lots of Dixie Youth Baseball, getting longer extension in his golf swing, and having a driver with high enough loft and correct shaft for SS. As for playing yardages, best advice for long run is never play the same tee box twice. Playing the same yardages over and over only create a limited memory of what it requires to shoot well from those yardages. She will become a more dynamic player and have a higher golf IQ playing different shot selections and ultimately become a better player because her favorite shot will be the next one ��

I agree with the posters who emphasize mixing it up (short courses/easier comp to learn to score low and win as well as longer courses/tougher comp to be more challenged) but have quoted GolfDad14 as it seems to be the only post to mention playing another sport. While practicing golf is the quickest way to get good at golf, developing speed, strength, balance, etc. with other sports can increase upside and pay longer term dividends. I think it can also reduce the chance of getting burned out on golf. Guys like Nicklaus were good at other sports growing up and some of the most athletic and longest players on tour (like Gary Woodland) played other sports into college.

Our son's coach always asks him when baseball or basketball season starts.  He's a huge proponent of coaching athletes and not just golfers.  I have a feeling he's very much into proprioception and the benefits to developing it through other sports.

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#23 kekoa

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 01:00 PM

I'll preface by saying my son is only 7, but it could be applicable to your daughter as well on how to shoot lower scores.

Besides swing technique, I've had my son practice a lot on shots 50 yards and in.  He also works a lot on contact and distance control.  Of course, his putting has improved significantly over the years as well.  I bought him one of those Big Moss putting greens and he's practicing on it all the time.  Of course I would love to have him drive it further, but he is limited in this aspect for now.  My kid is a twig so we have to just deal with being a short knocker for now.  He tries his best to make it up with a strong short game.

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#24 tiger1873

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 05:20 PM

As an update to this thread because it is a year old. I have found that you need to teach them mental toughness.  The more I see my daughters focus on their mental game the better they do.

For girls I believe this is much harder to accomplish then boys. I learned that girls will just break down and you need to teach them how to march on.  You also need to teach them how to deal with disappointment and how to deals with the highs. Both are important because they are bound to happen on the course.

The other part is just simply hitting the ball better, this means you get more distance and hit more greens in regulation.  Distance comes with time and if you can't reach the green in two you simply are not going to lower the score.

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#25 heavy_hitter

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 11:39 AM

A lot of good things in this thread.  At the end of the day it comes down to only a handful of things to improve scores.

1)  Eliminate Penalty Strokes
2)  No 3 Putts
3)  No 2 chips, 2 pitches, 2 bunker shots

Once you limit these it comes down to wedge play inside of 100 yards.  My son's comfort zone is 60-90 yards.  He knows if he can get inside of those yardages he can stick a wedge to inside of 15 feet giving him a chance at an up and down.


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#26 SkiSchoolPro

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 11:04 AM

View Postleezer99, on 05 September 2017 - 12:46 PM, said:

Our son's coach always asks him when baseball or basketball season starts.  He's a huge proponent of coaching athletes and not just golfers.  I have a feeling he's very much into proprioception and the benefits to developing it through other sports.

Yes!
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http://bleacherrepor...ed-other-sports
http://www.cleveland...hands_were.html
http://www.thevermon...-on-the-slopes/

Edited by SkiSchoolPro, 07 September 2017 - 11:05 AM.


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#27 killer21

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Posted 18 September 2017 - 08:24 PM

Golf is a cruel game as there is only one winner each tournament. My daughter is 8 and in tough with the 8-9 year old division. Same girl wins every week.
Taking our coaches advice, just trying to lower scores and improve each time out.  I really have to sit back look around and remember she is only 8 and who really cares just because we have caddy bibs on and the kids are dressed like a million bucks nobody else cares out there and its not that big a deal. (so for crying out loud let your gets play a little quicker on the greens!)
She can hit it pretty well, struggling around the greens - I see potential due to her power but just trying to be patient.
You really have to give your child time to grow and be patient and just slow down a bit and let them develop over time physically and mentally!
I don't think you can really press the panic button at 8 or 9.
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#28 Ferguson

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Posted 19 September 2017 - 08:45 AM

View Postagatha, on 01 November 2016 - 10:21 PM, said:

Please don't take this the wrong way as I am not trying to make any assumptions just sharing my thoughts from observations over the years.  I think you might want to get her a swing coach to help her develop the skills in the proper progression to improve, remove yourself from that role and be "dad". You can be part of team "insert her name here" but being in a more supporting role rather than in charge could go a long way in that father/daughter relationship.
It might not seem that big of a deal now but have seen too many daughters with daddy caddies or coaches that turns sour and I think you could enjoy it a whole lot more as the support and find her the people and tools she needs to get where she wants to go.   Hope this made sense..

Could not agree more.   I backed off when my son was 11 and got him a professional.

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