Jump to content

Welcome. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest which does not give you access to all the great features at GolfWRX such as viewing all the images, interacting with members, access to all forums and eligiblility to win free giveaways. Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free. Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

- - - - -

Hip Replacement - How long till you golfed again @ 100%


120 replies to this topic

#91 tyorke1

tyorke1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 33236
  • Joined: 06/29/2007
  • Location:PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND , CANADA
  • Handicap:+1.4
GolfWRX Likes : 435

Posted 14 November 2017 - 03:13 PM

why the poly and not ceramic?

m3 9.5 xtorsion 60x  but may use speeder in it ,
m2 driver 2017 9.5  speeder evolution 661 tour spec x,
m2 3 wd, 15 degree rogue  125 msi tour x ,
m2 5 wood purple ice 95x
816 h1 hybrid 19 degree ,speeder tour spec
srixon u65 20 degree,
716cb 3-pw amt s300
vokey 52-54-56-58-60
piretti cottonwood putter
set up is always subject to changes

Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


1

#92 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 14 November 2017 - 03:31 PM

View Posttyorke1, on 14 November 2017 - 03:13 PM, said:

why the poly and not ceramic?

That's what my surgeon said he prefers and uses on all of his young patients when he can. The ball is ceramic, the liner is a vitamin-E infused HXPE

I find this video to be pretty cool: https://youtu.be/tbRibQsIowM

Biolox Delta: https://www.ceramtec...lox/ball-heads/  

Liner material: http://www.zimmerbio...lyethylene.html

I'm hopeful to get 30+ years out of the ball and liner, would be nice to only need 1 revision.

Edited by ddetts, 14 November 2017 - 03:32 PM.

Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

2

#93 eighteen

eighteen

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 250572
  • Joined: 05/14/2013
  • Location:Saudi Arabia
  • Handicap:11.7
GolfWRX Likes : 10

Posted 15 November 2017 - 02:51 PM

My surgeon did ceramic on poly as well. I am 41 and he seems to think it should be at least 15 years, probably 18-20. He does posterior approach... As said by a few others, the first two days were hard, and now every day is an improvement. I was told at least 8 weeks before golf, I will probably be more like 11 or so as my holidays start at week 8 and we are heading out for three weeks.
I am now at 2.5 weeks and am using one crutch as I wobble without.

I really only feel the cut now usually. I still can't lie on the right side but it was suggested that actually won't happen until the staples are out. That is happening on Sunday. 

Today was the first day I actually thought how things might be moving forward, not having pain. I think that is the biggest thing... I don't think I realized how much being in the pain for three years actually affected so much. I am looking forward to January and being cleared to do a lot more. There is a small chance of golfing before Xmas, but I think since we are heading out I will wait until I return to actually try.

Long story short, things are literally improving day to day. If you know of anyone debating getting it done, as of right now, I would say do it, it seems to be good so far.



3

#94 tyorke1

tyorke1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 33236
  • Joined: 06/29/2007
  • Location:PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND , CANADA
  • Handicap:+1.4
GolfWRX Likes : 435

Posted 15 November 2017 - 03:11 PM

Thanks, I found the last two yrs  I was manipulating the swing and if I had to walk the last nine was brutal. looking forward getting it done
m3 9.5 xtorsion 60x  but may use speeder in it ,
m2 driver 2017 9.5  speeder evolution 661 tour spec x,
m2 3 wd, 15 degree rogue  125 msi tour x ,
m2 5 wood purple ice 95x
816 h1 hybrid 19 degree ,speeder tour spec
srixon u65 20 degree,
716cb 3-pw amt s300
vokey 52-54-56-58-60
piretti cottonwood putter
set up is always subject to changes

4

#95 eighteen

eighteen

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 250572
  • Joined: 05/14/2013
  • Location:Saudi Arabia
  • Handicap:11.7
GolfWRX Likes : 10

Posted 19 November 2017 - 04:41 AM

Today I had to the Dr for the removal of the staples and a check in. PT is going on three times a week (I am lucky with my health care and the clinic is three minutes away) and every day I am getting stronger and stronger. I am definitely itching to get out in the course, I see the following view from my bedroom every day:

Posted Image

Yup, that is a night picture, the course is fully lit for night play.

Looking forward to the continual healing and that first drive when back.


5

#96 tyorke1

tyorke1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 33236
  • Joined: 06/29/2007
  • Location:PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND , CANADA
  • Handicap:+1.4
GolfWRX Likes : 435

Posted 19 November 2017 - 01:37 PM

nice keep me posted , thanks
m3 9.5 xtorsion 60x  but may use speeder in it ,
m2 driver 2017 9.5  speeder evolution 661 tour spec x,
m2 3 wd, 15 degree rogue  125 msi tour x ,
m2 5 wood purple ice 95x
816 h1 hybrid 19 degree ,speeder tour spec
srixon u65 20 degree,
716cb 3-pw amt s300
vokey 52-54-56-58-60
piretti cottonwood putter
set up is always subject to changes

6

#97 tyorke1

tyorke1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 33236
  • Joined: 06/29/2007
  • Location:PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND , CANADA
  • Handicap:+1.4
GolfWRX Likes : 435

Posted 19 December 2017 - 09:44 PM

had the same surgery posterio with same materials. tomorrow is 2 week post op , things are good walking with a cain . He did put me on a antibiotic to make sure of no infection. overall pleased with how things are going. Keep me posted when you think yo can hit balls,
m3 9.5 xtorsion 60x  but may use speeder in it ,
m2 driver 2017 9.5  speeder evolution 661 tour spec x,
m2 3 wd, 15 degree rogue  125 msi tour x ,
m2 5 wood purple ice 95x
816 h1 hybrid 19 degree ,speeder tour spec
srixon u65 20 degree,
716cb 3-pw amt s300
vokey 52-54-56-58-60
piretti cottonwood putter
set up is always subject to changes

7

#98 eighteen

eighteen

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 250572
  • Joined: 05/14/2013
  • Location:Saudi Arabia
  • Handicap:11.7
GolfWRX Likes : 10

Posted 20 December 2017 - 03:05 AM

View Posttyorke1, on 19 December 2017 - 09:44 PM, said:

had the same surgery posterio with same materials. tomorrow is 2 week post op , things are good walking with a cain . He did put me on a antibiotic to make sure of no infection. overall pleased with how things are going. Keep me posted when you think yo can hit balls,

I am at 7 weeks today. The kids had a little par three tourney on the weekend, so I was in charge of a foursome, hit a few wedges so that was good. I did take a cart as my back gets a bit sore still walking - I used two crutches for maybe 3 weeks, then one the last three and got rid of the crutch on Thursday. The wound is all healed up, and now it is about getting all of the muscles working properly again, not working in the weird compensated way that they were working the last three years. I get a literal pain in the a** as well in weird spots in my back where muscles connect and move towards your bottom.

Ortho said 8 weeks to golf, he legitimately must mean getting out there and doing light work, as there is no way I would do a full swinging motion as of right now. I can't pull up my foot and cross my operated leg over the other to put on socks, for example. There is still some pain in these types of movements.

My physio is really good and I have been learning a lot about the hip, all the different muscles, weird ones that do things I didn't even know about and about realistic returns. The fast turning motion would probably cause problems and set me back.

I have a three week holiday starting tomorrow, the thought between myself and my physio is that if I am consistently doing my exercises and walking everyday, when I get back I should probably be good to go. That will be around 10.5 weeks or so. She did stress that it is smarter to take it slow, as an injury will set me back weeks.

I researched for hours the various things surrounding this, including healing etc, the reality is that, yes, as far as common surgery's, a hip replacement is quite easy and successful. I have learned that easy surgeries don't necessarily mean easy recovery.  I do know people can heal really quick and be doing crazy active stuff really early, but I truly believe that is outside the norm. In all her years, my physio said that my recovery is right on par/track for what should be expected. As a matter of fact, just two days ago she said she wished docs would be more open and realistic with patients and tell them that 12 weeks tends to be around the point where people are healed up and strong enough to start going back to old activities (if they have been doing their exercises!).

I was feeling a bit down, as if I was slow in healing etc and was reassured that no, where I was at was legitimately where most people would be and that it is coming along well. Both my gp and physio made some good points and had me think about where I was at the day I left the hospital, where I was a week after the operation, three weeks after and then three days ago. I am legitimately improving every day, but the body needs time to relearn what it has been doing wrong.

Long, a bit meandering, but I think you get the picture.  Also, I am totally pain free for the first time in three years, I wouldn't hesitate to tell people to go and do it...

8

#99 kenwiggins11

kenwiggins11

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 327 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 117327
  • Joined: 11/10/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 24

Posted 20 December 2017 - 03:16 AM

View Posteighteen, on 20 December 2017 - 03:05 AM, said:

View Posttyorke1, on 19 December 2017 - 09:44 PM, said:

had the same surgery posterio with same materials. tomorrow is 2 week post op , things are good walking with a cain . He did put me on a antibiotic to make sure of no infection. overall pleased with how things are going. Keep me posted when you think yo can hit balls,

I am at 7 weeks today. The kids had a little par three tourney on the weekend, so I was in charge of a foursome, hit a few wedges so that was good. I did take a cart as my back gets a bit sore still walking - I used two crutches for maybe 3 weeks, then one the last three and got rid of the crutch on Thursday. The wound is all healed up, and now it is about getting all of the muscles working properly again, not working in the weird compensated way that they were working the last three years. I get a literal pain in the a** as well in weird spots in my back where muscles connect and move towards your bottom.

Ortho said 8 weeks to golf, he legitimately must mean getting out there and doing light work, as there is no way I would do a full swinging motion as of right now. I can't pull up my foot and cross my operated leg over the other to put on socks, for example. There is still some pain in these types of movements.

My physio is really good and I have been learning a lot about the hip, all the different muscles, weird ones that do things I didn't even know about and about realistic returns. The fast turning motion would probably cause problems and set me back.

I have a three week holiday starting tomorrow, the thought between myself and my physio is that if I am consistently doing my exercises and walking everyday, when I get back I should probably be good to go. That will be around 10.5 weeks or so. She did stress that it is smarter to take it slow, as an injury will set me back weeks.

I researched for hours the various things surrounding this, including healing etc, the reality is that, yes, as far as common surgery's, a hip replacement is quite easy and successful. I have learned that easy surgeries don't necessarily mean easy recovery.  I do know people can heal really quick and be doing crazy active stuff really early, but I truly believe that is outside the norm. In all her years, my physio said that my recovery is right on par/track for what should be expected. As a matter of fact, just two days ago she said she wished docs would be more open and realistic with patients and tell them that 12 weeks tends to be around the point where people are healed up and strong enough to start going back to old activities (if they have been doing their exercises!).

I was feeling a bit down, as if I was slow in healing etc and was reassured that no, where I was at was legitimately where most people would be and that it is coming along well. Both my gp and physio made some good points and had me think about where I was at the day I left the hospital, where I was a week after the operation, three weeks after and then three days ago. I am legitimately improving every day, but the body needs time to relearn what it has been doing wrong.

Long, a bit meandering, but I think you get the picture.  Also, I am totally pain free for the first time in three years, I wouldn't hesitate to tell people to go and do it...

What your experiencing is 100% normal. The mental game was the hardest on me. Wondering if I would get better. If my progress was normal. Research is lacking on recovery especially for patients in the younger end of the spectrum. I agree that your right I track! Stay positive which at times hard to do and not get down a bit. You will Be hitting bombs in no time

View Posteighteen, on 20 December 2017 - 03:05 AM, said:

View Posttyorke1, on 19 December 2017 - 09:44 PM, said:

had the same surgery posterio with same materials. tomorrow is 2 week post op , things are good walking with a cain . He did put me on a antibiotic to make sure of no infection. overall pleased with how things are going. Keep me posted when you think yo can hit balls,

I am at 7 weeks today. The kids had a little par three tourney on the weekend, so I was in charge of a foursome, hit a few wedges so that was good. I did take a cart as my back gets a bit sore still walking - I used two crutches for maybe 3 weeks, then one the last three and got rid of the crutch on Thursday. The wound is all healed up, and now it is about getting all of the muscles working properly again, not working in the weird compensated way that they were working the last three years. I get a literal pain in the a** as well in weird spots in my back where muscles connect and move towards your bottom.

Ortho said 8 weeks to golf, he legitimately must mean getting out there and doing light work, as there is no way I would do a full swinging motion as of right now. I can't pull up my foot and cross my operated leg over the other to put on socks, for example. There is still some pain in these types of movements.

My physio is really good and I have been learning a lot about the hip, all the different muscles, weird ones that do things I didn't even know about and about realistic returns. The fast turning motion would probably cause problems and set me back.

I have a three week holiday starting tomorrow, the thought between myself and my physio is that if I am consistently doing my exercises and walking everyday, when I get back I should probably be good to go. That will be around 10.5 weeks or so. She did stress that it is smarter to take it slow, as an injury will set me back weeks.

I researched for hours the various things surrounding this, including healing etc, the reality is that, yes, as far as common surgery's, a hip replacement is quite easy and successful. I have learned that easy surgeries don't necessarily mean easy recovery.  I do know people can heal really quick and be doing crazy active stuff really early, but I truly believe that is outside the norm. In all her years, my physio said that my recovery is right on par/track for what should be expected. As a matter of fact, just two days ago she said she wished docs would be more open and realistic with patients and tell them that 12 weeks tends to be around the point where people are healed up and strong enough to start going back to old activities (if they have been doing their exercises!).

I was feeling a bit down, as if I was slow in healing etc and was reassured that no, where I was at was legitimately where most people would be and that it is coming along well. Both my gp and physio made some good points and had me think about where I was at the day I left the hospital, where I was a week after the operation, three weeks after and then three days ago. I am legitimately improving every day, but the body needs time to relearn what it has been doing wrong.

Long, a bit meandering, but I think you get the picture.  Also, I am totally pain free for the first time in three years, I wouldn't hesitate to tell people to go and do it...

What your experiencing is 100% normal. The mental game was the hardest on me. Wondering if I would get better. If my progress was normal. Research is lacking on recovery especially for patients in the younger end of the spectrum. I agree that your right I track! Stay positive which at times hard to do and not get down a bit. You will Be hitting bombs in no time

9

#100 eighteen

eighteen

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 250572
  • Joined: 05/14/2013
  • Location:Saudi Arabia
  • Handicap:11.7
GolfWRX Likes : 10

Posted 20 December 2017 - 03:17 AM

Some more info:

Re- antibiotics, every doc does it different, I was on them for the days in the hospital via my IV- that was four days - I was definitely really careful with the wound when I got home - I always had a bandage on it, and when i showered i wrapped up with saran wrap AND duct taped around it to try and prevent any water getting in. I also would change the bandage right after the shower and wipe the wound down with rubbing alcohol.

Blood thinners - most docs tend to give them, I had a shot every day for 31 days after the surgery. My wife did them, as I can't do that to myself. My colleague had a replacement and couldn't do the needles so she had a daily aspirin instead

Cane vs crutch - I found the crutch easier to use, it was the metal type that has the plastic u-part that holds onto your forearm. I have a cane, but it just seemed a tiny bit too short so I got more pain walking with it.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


10

#101 eighteen

eighteen

    Rookie

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 250572
  • Joined: 05/14/2013
  • Location:Saudi Arabia
  • Handicap:11.7
GolfWRX Likes : 10

Posted 20 December 2017 - 03:29 AM

Too true about the mental part. Sunday I had my PT and GP visit, and I was close to breakdown in both of them. One good reason not to read too much on the internet about recovery, as you will always find the few people that miraculously were back at it 4 weeks in...

11

#102 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 20 December 2017 - 11:13 AM

View Postkenwiggins11, on 20 December 2017 - 03:16 AM, said:

View Posteighteen, on 20 December 2017 - 03:05 AM, said:

View Posttyorke1, on 19 December 2017 - 09:44 PM, said:

had the same surgery posterio with same materials. tomorrow is 2 week post op , things are good walking with a cain . He did put me on a antibiotic to make sure of no infection. overall pleased with how things are going. Keep me posted when you think yo can hit balls,

I am at 7 weeks today. The kids had a little par three tourney on the weekend, so I was in charge of a foursome, hit a few wedges so that was good. I did take a cart as my back gets a bit sore still walking - I used two crutches for maybe 3 weeks, then one the last three and got rid of the crutch on Thursday. The wound is all healed up, and now it is about getting all of the muscles working properly again, not working in the weird compensated way that they were working the last three years. I get a literal pain in the a** as well in weird spots in my back where muscles connect and move towards your bottom.

Ortho said 8 weeks to golf, he legitimately must mean getting out there and doing light work, as there is no way I would do a full swinging motion as of right now. I can't pull up my foot and cross my operated leg over the other to put on socks, for example. There is still some pain in these types of movements.

My physio is really good and I have been learning a lot about the hip, all the different muscles, weird ones that do things I didn't even know about and about realistic returns. The fast turning motion would probably cause problems and set me back.

I have a three week holiday starting tomorrow, the thought between myself and my physio is that if I am consistently doing my exercises and walking everyday, when I get back I should probably be good to go. That will be around 10.5 weeks or so. She did stress that it is smarter to take it slow, as an injury will set me back weeks.

I researched for hours the various things surrounding this, including healing etc, the reality is that, yes, as far as common surgery's, a hip replacement is quite easy and successful. I have learned that easy surgeries don't necessarily mean easy recovery.  I do know people can heal really quick and be doing crazy active stuff really early, but I truly believe that is outside the norm. In all her years, my physio said that my recovery is right on par/track for what should be expected. As a matter of fact, just two days ago she said she wished docs would be more open and realistic with patients and tell them that 12 weeks tends to be around the point where people are healed up and strong enough to start going back to old activities (if they have been doing their exercises!).

I was feeling a bit down, as if I was slow in healing etc and was reassured that no, where I was at was legitimately where most people would be and that it is coming along well. Both my gp and physio made some good points and had me think about where I was at the day I left the hospital, where I was a week after the operation, three weeks after and then three days ago. I am legitimately improving every day, but the body needs time to relearn what it has been doing wrong.

Long, a bit meandering, but I think you get the picture.  Also, I am totally pain free for the first time in three years, I wouldn't hesitate to tell people to go and do it...

What your experiencing is 100% normal. The mental game was the hardest on me. Wondering if I would get better. If my progress was normal. Research is lacking on recovery especially for patients in the younger end of the spectrum. I agree that your right I track! Stay positive which at times hard to do and not get down a bit. You will Be hitting bombs in no time

View Posteighteen, on 20 December 2017 - 03:05 AM, said:

View Posttyorke1, on 19 December 2017 - 09:44 PM, said:

had the same surgery posterio with same materials. tomorrow is 2 week post op , things are good walking with a cain . He did put me on a antibiotic to make sure of no infection. overall pleased with how things are going. Keep me posted when you think yo can hit balls,

I am at 7 weeks today. The kids had a little par three tourney on the weekend, so I was in charge of a foursome, hit a few wedges so that was good. I did take a cart as my back gets a bit sore still walking - I used two crutches for maybe 3 weeks, then one the last three and got rid of the crutch on Thursday. The wound is all healed up, and now it is about getting all of the muscles working properly again, not working in the weird compensated way that they were working the last three years. I get a literal pain in the a** as well in weird spots in my back where muscles connect and move towards your bottom.

Ortho said 8 weeks to golf, he legitimately must mean getting out there and doing light work, as there is no way I would do a full swinging motion as of right now. I can't pull up my foot and cross my operated leg over the other to put on socks, for example. There is still some pain in these types of movements.

My physio is really good and I have been learning a lot about the hip, all the different muscles, weird ones that do things I didn't even know about and about realistic returns. The fast turning motion would probably cause problems and set me back.

I have a three week holiday starting tomorrow, the thought between myself and my physio is that if I am consistently doing my exercises and walking everyday, when I get back I should probably be good to go. That will be around 10.5 weeks or so. She did stress that it is smarter to take it slow, as an injury will set me back weeks.

I researched for hours the various things surrounding this, including healing etc, the reality is that, yes, as far as common surgery's, a hip replacement is quite easy and successful. I have learned that easy surgeries don't necessarily mean easy recovery.  I do know people can heal really quick and be doing crazy active stuff really early, but I truly believe that is outside the norm. In all her years, my physio said that my recovery is right on par/track for what should be expected. As a matter of fact, just two days ago she said she wished docs would be more open and realistic with patients and tell them that 12 weeks tends to be around the point where people are healed up and strong enough to start going back to old activities (if they have been doing their exercises!).

I was feeling a bit down, as if I was slow in healing etc and was reassured that no, where I was at was legitimately where most people would be and that it is coming along well. Both my gp and physio made some good points and had me think about where I was at the day I left the hospital, where I was a week after the operation, three weeks after and then three days ago. I am legitimately improving every day, but the body needs time to relearn what it has been doing wrong.

Long, a bit meandering, but I think you get the picture.  Also, I am totally pain free for the first time in three years, I wouldn't hesitate to tell people to go and do it...

What your experiencing is 100% normal. The mental game was the hardest on me. Wondering if I would get better. If my progress was normal. Research is lacking on recovery especially for patients in the younger end of the spectrum. I agree that your right I track! Stay positive which at times hard to do and not get down a bit. You will Be hitting bombs in no time

Here's some thoughts on all the previous remarks, as I approach my 1 year hip anniversary in a week:

1. All surgeries and recoveries are different - you'll be told very general time frames for milestones and recoveries, but the truth is everyone's anatomy is different. Everyone's issues are different. The surgeon's work will have small variances every surgery (they aren't robots). Trust in what your doctor, and especially your physical therapist is telling you.

2. The mental aspect is very tough as well. Your in pain, your function is very limited, and it takes time. It's easy to start running all kinds of scenarios in your head, like "will I ever be able to do this again" or "will I ever be the same", etc. Set small goals and focus on meeting them. I'll walk "X" amount every day this week and continue to build. Same for exercises or range of motion.

3. Back to PT - be super honest and open with your PT, tell them what is still hard to do, what causes pain, and any concerns. The more information they have, the better than can try to diagnose problem areas/muscles/movements and give you the proper work to do.

In some aspects I was really lucky in my recovery. I stopped taking pain killers after 2 days, I was walking without any aids and driving after like 11 days, and had a great early recovery. I played 18 holes (with a cart) at around 8 weeks and I mean full-on 100% swinging every club without pain. But because of previous compensations and weakness my body learned a really poor way in order to avoid the pain pre-surgery. I would get really bad kneed pain in my operated leg, even after walking fairly short distances. So much so I would have to really lean on things to walk around. It took close to 3 months of on and off PT work to finally pin-point issues, get the right muscles activating for the right movements and in general getting my posterior chain working correctly when I walked.
Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

12

#103 One_Putt_Blunder

One_Putt_Blunder

    Hall of Fame

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,119 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 56737
  • Joined: 05/28/2008
  • Location:Scottsdale Az
GolfWRX Likes : 4014

Posted 20 December 2017 - 11:15 AM

View Posteighteen, on 20 December 2017 - 03:05 AM, said:

View Posttyorke1, on 19 December 2017 - 09:44 PM, said:

had the same surgery posterio with same materials. tomorrow is 2 week post op , things are good walking with a cain . He did put me on a antibiotic to make sure of no infection. overall pleased with how things are going. Keep me posted when you think yo can hit balls,

I am at 7 weeks today. The kids had a little par three tourney on the weekend, so I was in charge of a foursome, hit a few wedges so that was good. I did take a cart as my back gets a bit sore still walking - I used two crutches for maybe 3 weeks, then one the last three and got rid of the crutch on Thursday. The wound is all healed up, and now it is about getting all of the muscles working properly again, not working in the weird compensated way that they were working the last three years. I get a literal pain in the a** as well in weird spots in my back where muscles connect and move towards your bottom.

Ortho said 8 weeks to golf, he legitimately must mean getting out there and doing light work, as there is no way I would do a full swinging motion as of right now. I can't pull up my foot and cross my operated leg over the other to put on socks, for example. There is still some pain in these types of movements.

My physio is really good and I have been learning a lot about the hip, all the different muscles, weird ones that do things I didn't even know about and about realistic returns. The fast turning motion would probably cause problems and set me back.

I have a three week holiday starting tomorrow, the thought between myself and my physio is that if I am consistently doing my exercises and walking everyday, when I get back I should probably be good to go. That will be around 10.5 weeks or so. She did stress that it is smarter to take it slow, as an injury will set me back weeks.

I researched for hours the various things surrounding this, including healing etc, the reality is that, yes, as far as common surgery's, a hip replacement is quite easy and successful. I have learned that easy surgeries don't necessarily mean easy recovery.  I do know people can heal really quick and be doing crazy active stuff really early, but I truly believe that is outside the norm. In all her years, my physio said that my recovery is right on par/track for what should be expected. As a matter of fact, just two days ago she said she wished docs would be more open and realistic with patients and tell them that 12 weeks tends to be around the point where people are healed up and strong enough to start going back to old activities (if they have been doing their exercises!).

I was feeling a bit down, as if I was slow in healing etc and was reassured that no, where I was at was legitimately where most people would be and that it is coming along well. Both my gp and physio made some good points and had me think about where I was at the day I left the hospital, where I was a week after the operation, three weeks after and then three days ago. I am legitimately improving every day, but the body needs time to relearn what it has been doing wrong.

Long, a bit meandering, but I think you get the picture.  Also, I am totally pain free for the first time in three years, I wouldn't hesitate to tell people to go and do it...

Pretty normal, even though I played my first full round 3 months post op I really did not have full mental confidence back for almost 18 months. Even today 5 years later I feel like I am still getting stronger
@oneputtblunder
10.5 Aeroburner TP Fujikura Speeder Pro XLR8
14.5 X2 Hot 3 Deep Tour Green
18* X2 Hot Pro Hybrid
RSI TP 4-PW KBS Tour 120
Byron Morgan DH89 Rincon Neck deep mill or Circa 62 No 2
Vokey 52/56/60 SM5/TVDK/TVDVgrind DG S300
WITB Link

13

#104 tyorke1

tyorke1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 33236
  • Joined: 06/29/2007
  • Location:PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND , CANADA
  • Handicap:+1.4
GolfWRX Likes : 435

Posted 20 December 2017 - 12:36 PM

there's allot of us, thanks for all the responses, I am gearing towards 12-16 weeks and okay with that.
m3 9.5 xtorsion 60x  but may use speeder in it ,
m2 driver 2017 9.5  speeder evolution 661 tour spec x,
m2 3 wd, 15 degree rogue  125 msi tour x ,
m2 5 wood purple ice 95x
816 h1 hybrid 19 degree ,speeder tour spec
srixon u65 20 degree,
716cb 3-pw amt s300
vokey 52-54-56-58-60
piretti cottonwood putter
set up is always subject to changes

14

#105 short game

short game

    Advanced

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 281 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 428010
  • Joined: 06/06/2016
  • Location:SC
  • Handicap:13
GolfWRX Likes : 82

Posted 24 December 2017 - 07:22 PM

View Posteighteen, on 20 December 2017 - 03:29 AM, said:

Too true about the mental part. Sunday I had my PT and GP visit, and I was close to breakdown in both of them. One good reason not to read too much on the internet about recovery, as you will always find the few people that miraculously were back at it 4 weeks in...

Yeah - don't believe all that you hear. i had someone tell me they were back at work in a week. It took me like 7-8 weeks to get back to work - and i was still hurting when i went back.

Patient's disease process is different (RA is different than DJD and thats different than AVN) age is different, degree of muscle dysfunction different - all of those effect length of recovery.

Glad to hear that you are through surgery and doing well.

Ping G 400 Max 10.5 Driver; Aldila Copper X-torsion 50R
Ping G 400 5 wood and 7 wood
Ping G 400  5 hybrid
Ping i200 5 - UW
Ping Glide 2.0 54 (bent to 55) and 60
Betti BB 54 / Ping Tyne

Titelst Pro V1

15

#106 tyorke1

tyorke1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 33236
  • Joined: 06/29/2007
  • Location:PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND , CANADA
  • Handicap:+1.4
GolfWRX Likes : 435

Posted 08 February 2018 - 08:35 PM

posterior approach dec6, feb 8th hit 10-15 balls on a simulator at golf shop, felt great and no issues. mind you my 7 iron maxed out at 158 carry and had to hit it flush for that !! wont hit any for another few weeks .  Workouts are going great  full bike cardio lots of stretching and ice.
m3 9.5 xtorsion 60x  but may use speeder in it ,
m2 driver 2017 9.5  speeder evolution 661 tour spec x,
m2 3 wd, 15 degree rogue  125 msi tour x ,
m2 5 wood purple ice 95x
816 h1 hybrid 19 degree ,speeder tour spec
srixon u65 20 degree,
716cb 3-pw amt s300
vokey 52-54-56-58-60
piretti cottonwood putter
set up is always subject to changes

16

#107 torbill

torbill

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 107208
  • Joined: 05/01/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 58

Posted 09 February 2018 - 12:27 AM

I am just blown away by some of the recovery times that I have read about, tonight.  I wrote earlier in this thread that I was playing golf and walking the course exactly 6 weeks post op, and I was 67 years old at the time, and I was no great physical specimen although I always walked the course so I was in good shape.  I thought that 6 weeks was normal.

I have to conclude that the skill of the surgeon, or blind luck, did it for me.  I am guessing the former.  I had this surgery at the Mayo Clinic.  I really researched surgeons.  I know a lot of people at Mayo, and the wife of a golf friend who was a nurse anesthetist gave me a name.  It turns out that, had I showed up unannounced at the front door of Mayo and said I needed a hip, and my first name was something like Tiger or Barak, this is the guy they would direct me to.  I knew he was good, I guess I didn’t know how good.  

I recently found out how good this guy is. I went to a new chiropractor for a sore back, and he took x-rays.  He came into the room and looked the x-ray up on his computer.  He said, “hey, you didn’t tell me that you had a hip done”.  Then he did a double take, studied the x-ray and said, “wow, I have never seen such a perfectly aligned hip!”.

My conclusion is that it is surgeon skill, not luck, that got me such a good result and short recovery time.  So, to anybody who needs a hip and reads this thread I say, spend your time picking the best surgeon you can find.  Don’t worry about the type of appliance or the technical details.  Pick a really good surgeon.

My cousin had the opposite experience.  He lives in Florida.  He had a terrible hip.  He was afraid of surgery.  My story made him confident.  He found some local guy who did the job.  During the initial recovery period, his hip popped out.  The surgeon recognized that he had built an interference into the job, and my cousin let him do a revision, with different parts.  And you guessed it, it popped out again and my crazy cousin went and let the same surgeon take a third crack at it.  Hips may seem simple, but they certainly are not so simple that a surgeon cannot totally screw things up.  

A good way to pick a surgeon is word of mouth.  Talk to people who have had it done.  Get names.  Check out the names.  This way of picking a surgeon was given to me by a friend of my son-in-law.  He is a Mayo trained surgeon.  He told me that things such as board certification, medical school prestige, years of experience, etc. mean little in the real world.  Patients may not know all the technical ins and outs, but they know the result, and that speaks volumes about the skill of the surgeon.


17

#108 fore left

fore left

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 165 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 123327
  • Joined: 03/01/2011
GolfWRX Likes : 15

Posted 09 February 2018 - 08:09 AM

Had my left hip done ( I'm a righty ) - 4 weeks started putting, 6 weeks short irons & 8 weeks for the driver. Started actually playing at 12 weeks. What I found was the problem was not my new hip, but because it had been over a year since I could really use my lower body correctly due to pain my muscles had lost a lot of tone. Many of the old ways to build back that muscle strength weren't advisable with the new hip. Took ~ 6 months to really figure things out and get back my strength.

18

#109 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 09 February 2018 - 11:03 AM

View Posttorbill, on 09 February 2018 - 12:27 AM, said:

I am just blown away by some of the recovery times that I have read about, tonight.  I wrote earlier in this thread that I was playing golf and walking the course exactly 6 weeks post op, and I was 67 years old at the time, and I was no great physical specimen although I always walked the course so I was in good shape.  I thought that 6 weeks was normal.

I have to conclude that the skill of the surgeon, or blind luck, did it for me.  I am guessing the former.  I had this surgery at the Mayo Clinic.  I really researched surgeons.  I know a lot of people at Mayo, and the wife of a golf friend who was a nurse anesthetist gave me a name.  It turns out that, had I showed up unannounced at the front door of Mayo and said I needed a hip, and my first name was something like Tiger or Barak, this is the guy they would direct me to.  I knew he was good, I guess I didn’t know how good.  

I recently found out how good this guy is. I went to a new chiropractor for a sore back, and he took x-rays.  He came into the room and looked the x-ray up on his computer.  He said, “hey, you didn’t tell me that you had a hip done”.  Then he did a double take, studied the x-ray and said, “wow, I have never seen such a perfectly aligned hip!”.

My conclusion is that it is surgeon skill, not luck, that got me such a good result and short recovery time.  So, to anybody who needs a hip and reads this thread I say, spend your time picking the best surgeon you can find.  Don’t worry about the type of appliance or the technical details.  Pick a really good surgeon.

My cousin had the opposite experience.  He lives in Florida.  He had a terrible hip.  He was afraid of surgery.  My story made him confident.  He found some local guy who did the job.  During the initial recovery period, his hip popped out.  The surgeon recognized that he had built an interference into the job, and my cousin let him do a revision, with different parts.  And you guessed it, it popped out again and my crazy cousin went and let the same surgeon take a third crack at it.  Hips may seem simple, but they certainly are not so simple that a surgeon cannot totally screw things up.  

A good way to pick a surgeon is word of mouth.  Talk to people who have had it done.  Get names.  Check out the names.  This way of picking a surgeon was given to me by a friend of my son-in-law.  He is a Mayo trained surgeon.  He told me that things such as board certification, medical school prestige, years of experience, etc. mean little in the real world.  Patients may not know all the technical ins and outs, but they know the result, and that speaks volumes about the skill of the surgeon.

I'm curious who did your hip surgery at Mayo - I had a joint preservation hip surgery, not my replacement surgery, at Mayo and so know a few of the hip ortho names (at the Rochester location). If you're not comfortable posting here, you can message me.
Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

19

#110 torbill

torbill

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 107208
  • Joined: 05/01/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 58

Posted 09 February 2018 - 05:07 PM

https://www.mayoclin...-d/bio-20054172

And...

He seems to love golf.  Mayo is a teaching institution, so before the staff doctors come in you get by interviewed by student doctors.  Well, they asked me how I got the way that I was, and I told them golf had probably ruined my hip.  They asked more questions.  One of them asked me my handicap.  When I told him that it was 4 he was impressed, given my age I suppose.  When Trousdale came into the room all he wanted to do was talk about golf with a good golfer, and how he had gotten a hole in one at one of the golf courses that we both play.  A fun conversation!  Eventually I asked him about my hip.  His reply, and I quote: “Oh, I’ll give you a perfect hip.”  Then back to golf conversation.   Well, it seems as though he gave me exactly what he said.  And according to my wife, one of the surgical nurses told her that my time in the operating room was 54 minutes.  

I think that I am going to need a knee one of these days.  I did some research a few years back to find a great knee surgeon.  This is the guy that came onto my radar, in case anybody needs a knee:

https://www.mayoclin...-d/bio-20053872

But I’ll tell you what.  I have decided that when I need a knee I am going to Trousdale.  I think that he is bigger in hips and Pagnano is bigger in knees (not sure of this) but I don’t care. My first choice is going to be Trousdale.

In any event, I again want to say to people who might need a hip, this procedure is routine, but there are many things that can go wrong and it always good to investigate and get the absolute best surgeon you can find.  In my case, I was 67 years old.  I was hitting full 9-iron shots one month after surgery.  Six weeks to the day after surgery I played 18 holes.  I drove a cart for the first 9 and I walked the back 9, and I have been walking ever since.  I just never realized until I read this thread how blessed I was to have such a short recovery, and I do give the surgeon a lot of the credit.  

Incidentally, the one thing that I discussed with the doc other than golf when I went in for my first appointment was the appliance and the approach.  I wanted metal-metal and an anterior approach.  He preferred posterior with a metal ball and a new cross-linked polyethylene cup.  We went around on this, a bit.  Finally I said that he is the expert and he should pick the method and device.  He smiled and said that he had had a bad cervical disk, due to all of the surgery bending I suppose, and when he went to a neck surgeon he picked the surgeon and did not tell him what to do.  I think that this is the best way - pick the surgeon and let him/her decide what is the best device and best method to fit your need and his/her experience.




Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


Wanna get rid of this ugly yellow box? And remove other annoying "stuff" in between posts? Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

20

#111 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 09 February 2018 - 09:44 PM

I figured it was probably Trousdale! Glad you've had such  great experience.

I'm pretty young (34), so they went with ceramic (Biolox Delta) ball and Vivacit-E (highly cross-linked polyethylene infused with Vitamin e). Performed an anterior approach (I don't think too many at Mayo do anterior). I'm hoping it lasts 25-30+ years so I only have to get new parts once a
Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

21

#112 torbill

torbill

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 107208
  • Joined: 05/01/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 58

Posted 10 February 2018 - 09:21 AM

ddetts, did you have Trousdale, too? How do you know of him?  They have quite a number of really good ortho surgeons at Mayo Rochester.

I don’t know hardly anything about hip materials (embarrassing to say, as I am an engineer, lol).  I investigated materials before I met the surgeon, and thought that I knew what I wanted, and he wanted to go in a different direction, and I just left it to him.  I have a metal ball for sure, and I have an advanced, highly cross-linked plastic.  Thinking about a plastic wear surface (polyethylene, no less) gave me a bit of heartburn, but they told me that they now have the data to on this material to say that it will last me for the duration.  I wonder if we both have the same polyethylene cup material.

Trousdale did me a huge favor by steering me clear of metal-metal, which is what was “the latest” at the time, and what sounded the best to me from an engineering standpoint, and what turned out within two years to be a disaster for a number of patients who went that way.  My understanding is that, where there was not excellent alignment or where there was any sort of interference at the far range of motion, there occurred what you might think of as some sort of fretting-like phenomenon that resulted in debris in the joint, which resulted in inflammation.  Lots of people had the problem and I am told that the solution was a two step process - remove the implant and have the patient lie in bed for a few months with no hip joint at all in order to let the inflammation go down, then do the revision with an implant that works.  This sounds gruesome, and I don’t know how true it actually is, but I thank Trousdale that I don’t have to any more than this about it.

Anterior approach.  Yes, it does seem that posterior approach is mostly what I hear about what they do at Mayo.  I don’t know why they seem to favor this, but Trousdale did and I know that others do, too.  Surgeons at Mayo rule the roost, and are free to use whatever they feel is best, as we know since you got the anterior approach, so there cannot be a standard policy on this.  I have one ongoing issue, if you want to call it that, with my hip.  At the time, Trousdale and I discussed the approach.  He told me that the one thing about the posterior approach is that he would have to cut through the piriformis muscle.  I asked him if it would effect golf and he said “only if you swing like Tiger Woods”.  And he was right, it has absolutely no effect on golf.  But, in normal life, there are certain positions that I rarely get into where I just don’t have the strength to perform the movement like I used to.  It is very minor when I experience it, but it is there, and that might be a fundamental difference between the two approaches.  What I wanted was the fastes recovery time that was consistent with a good result, and he told me in spite of what I had heard about anterior being faster this was not true, at least for his patients.  And he put me back on the golf course in six weeks flat, so he had a fair point.  I don’t know what the trade offs are, between the two approaches, other than the piriformis muscle.

For people of your age, they were going into hip resurfacing back when I got my hip.  Now I don’t hear about hip resurfacing.  If they are telling you that your materials will get anywhere near 25-30 years, then you can get through with one revision and that is not a problem because 25+ years from now the materials will be better yet and you will certainly get by with a single revision.  So maybe they don’t need re-surfacing anymore, what with the life of the materials for a full replacement.  Tell me a bit about ceramic.  Why do they use ceramic and not metal?  Did they talk to you about trade offs between the two materials?  Also, what is the role of the vitamins?  I wonder if I have vitamins in my plastic.  Who made your implant?  Mine is DePuy.


22

#113 torbill

torbill

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 107208
  • Joined: 05/01/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 58

Posted 10 February 2018 - 09:42 AM

P.S. We are snowbirds and drive through Sioux Falls often, on our way to and from.  It looks like a very nice city.  Did you ever play golf at Wild Horse in Gothenburg NE?

23

#114 tyorke1

tyorke1

    Major Winner

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,955 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 33236
  • Joined: 06/29/2007
  • Location:PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND , CANADA
  • Handicap:+1.4
GolfWRX Likes : 435

Posted 10 February 2018 - 10:46 AM

I went with ceramic on poly, dr told me after if he was to have the procedure that's what he would go with. How long until full 100% swings,
m3 9.5 xtorsion 60x  but may use speeder in it ,
m2 driver 2017 9.5  speeder evolution 661 tour spec x,
m2 3 wd, 15 degree rogue  125 msi tour x ,
m2 5 wood purple ice 95x
816 h1 hybrid 19 degree ,speeder tour spec
srixon u65 20 degree,
716cb 3-pw amt s300
vokey 52-54-56-58-60
piretti cottonwood putter
set up is always subject to changes

24

#115 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 10 February 2018 - 03:46 PM

View Posttorbill, on 10 February 2018 - 09:42 AM, said:

P.S. We are snowbirds and drive through Sioux Falls often, on our way to and from.  It looks like a very nice city.  Did you ever play golf at Wild Horse in Gothenburg NE?
I have not yet, but really want to play this course!

Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

25

#116 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 10 February 2018 - 03:48 PM

View Posttyorke1, on 10 February 2018 - 10:46 AM, said:

I went with ceramic on poly, dr told me after if he was to have the procedure that's what he would go with. How long until full 100% swings,
I was making pretty full swings in my basement around 6 weeks - my replacement was on my trail leg, so not as much rotational force going into it. I played 18 holes at like 8 or 9 weeks out, but I did take a cart.
Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

26

#117 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 10 February 2018 - 03:57 PM

View Posttorbill, on 10 February 2018 - 09:21 AM, said:

ddetts, did you have Trousdale, too? How do you know of him?  They have quite a number of really good ortho surgeons at Mayo Rochester.

I don’t know hardly anything about hip materials (embarrassing to say, as I am an engineer, lol).  I investigated materials before I met the surgeon, and thought that I knew what I wanted, and he wanted to go in a different direction, and I just left it to him.  I have a metal ball for sure, and I have an advanced, highly cross-linked plastic.  Thinking about a plastic wear surface (polyethylene, no less) gave me a bit of heartburn, but they told me that they now have the data to on this material to say that it will last me for the duration.  I wonder if we both have the same polyethylene cup material.

Trousdale did me a huge favor by steering me clear of metal-metal, which is what was “the latest” at the time, and what sounded the best to me from an engineering standpoint, and what turned out within two years to be a disaster for a number of patients who went that way.  My understanding is that, where there was not excellent alignment or where there was any sort of interference at the far range of motion, there occurred what you might think of as some sort of fretting-like phenomenon that resulted in debris in the joint, which resulted in inflammation.  Lots of people had the problem and I am told that the solution was a two step process - remove the implant and have the patient lie in bed for a few months with no hip joint at all in order to let the inflammation go down, then do the revision with an implant that works.  This sounds gruesome, and I don’t know how true it actually is, but I thank Trousdale that I don’t have to any more than this about it.

Anterior approach.  Yes, it does seem that posterior approach is mostly what I hear about what they do at Mayo.  I don’t know why they seem to favor this, but Trousdale did and I know that others do, too.  Surgeons at Mayo rule the roost, and are free to use whatever they feel is best, as we know since you got the anterior approach, so there cannot be a standard policy on this.  I have one ongoing issue, if you want to call it that, with my hip.  At the time, Trousdale and I discussed the approach.  He told me that the one thing about the posterior approach is that he would have to cut through the piriformis muscle.  I asked him if it would effect golf and he said “only if you swing like Tiger Woods”.  And he was right, it has absolutely no effect on golf.  But, in normal life, there are certain positions that I rarely get into where I just don’t have the strength to perform the movement like I used to.  It is very minor when I experience it, but it is there, and that might be a fundamental difference between the two approaches.  What I wanted was the fastes recovery time that was consistent with a good result, and he told me in spite of what I had heard about anterior being faster this was not true, at least for his patients.  And he put me back on the golf course in six weeks flat, so he had a fair point.  I don’t know what the trade offs are, between the two approaches, other than the piriformis muscle.

For people of your age, they were going into hip resurfacing back when I got my hip.  Now I don’t hear about hip resurfacing.  If they are telling you that your materials will get anywhere near 25-30 years, then you can get through with one revision and that is not a problem because 25+ years from now the materials will be better yet and you will certainly get by with a single revision.  So maybe they don’t need re-surfacing anymore, what with the life of the materials for a full replacement.  Tell me a bit about ceramic.  Why do they use ceramic and not metal?  Did they talk to you about trade offs between the two materials?  Also, what is the role of the vitamins?  I wonder if I have vitamins in my plastic.  Who made your implant?  Mine is DePuy.
The reason for my replacement was Avascuar Necrosis, and Mayo was one of the few places that offered a procedure with stem cells that had a chance at saving my hip or at least prolonging the need for surgery for a number of years. I had that procedure, done by Rafael Sierra in their ortho dept. He also does knee and hip replacements. In my research I came across Trousdale's info and also heard some recommendations for him. The surgery I had didn't work and so I decided to go with a very well known surgeon locally who was recommended by a few people in the medical device industry.

My "parts" were all Zimmer Biomet. The Biolox Delta ceramic head is actually made by another company called CeramTec. Ceramic is favored for its extremely low wear properties as well as its natural lubracative properties.

Here's info on the vitamin e poly i have: http://www.zimmerbio...lyethylene.html

From what I read, resurfacing isn't performed much in the US mostly due to the metal on metal problems mentioned. It also seems that the surgery needs to be much more precise for a good outcome.
Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

27

#118 torbill

torbill

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 107208
  • Joined: 05/01/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 58

Posted 11 February 2018 - 10:27 AM

View Postddetts, on 10 February 2018 - 03:46 PM, said:

View Posttorbill, on 10 February 2018 - 09:42 AM, said:

P.S. We are snowbirds and drive through Sioux Falls often, on our way to and from.  It looks like a very nice city.  Did you ever play golf at Wild Horse in Gothenburg NE?
I have not yet, but really want to play this course!

I played it one time when we were driving through.  I liked it!  Very different, and fun. Very affordable, nothing pretentious. I asked them how the course got to be, and was told that a group of local business people  wanted to do something nice for the community and maybe put Gothenburg on the map a little bit. Don't know if that's true, or not, but that is what I was told. It is a good course!

There are the upscale golf courses in the Sandhills, in the Valentine area. I would love to play a round at one of them, these are some of the higher rates golf course in the U.S. I actually set up a tee time at one of them a few years back, and got rained out. We stayed overnight in Valentine last fall, and they were talking about a new one that was just completed just outside of Valentine, too. It's quite a drive for you, but nevertheless there is great Sandhills golf, and it would be within striking distance if I lived in Sioux Falls because I'm pretty crazed about this sort of thing, lol, don't know about you.

28

#119 ddetts

ddetts

    Ty Webb

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 613 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 63197
  • Joined: 08/13/2008
  • Location:Sioux Falls, SD
  • Handicap:8.0
GolfWRX Likes : 149

Posted 11 February 2018 - 10:43 AM

I think Sand Hills is pretty tough to get on. I'd settle for just 3 day stay at The Prairie Club.
Nike Vapor Pro, Matrix Red Tie 6Q3
TaylorMade '17 M2 Tour 15*, Kuro Kage Silver Dual-Core TiNi
Callaway X Utility Prototype 18*, KBS Tour 120
Mizuno MP-54 3-4 / MP 15 5-PW, C-Taper Lite S
Mizuno MP-T5 52*/58*
TaylorMade TP Mullen

29

#120 torbill

torbill

    Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  •  
  • Member #: 107208
  • Joined: 05/01/2010
GolfWRX Likes : 58

Posted 11 February 2018 - 10:45 AM

View Postddetts, on 10 February 2018 - 03:57 PM, said:

View Posttorbill, on 10 February 2018 - 09:21 AM, said:

ddetts, did you have Trousdale, too? How do you know of him?  They have quite a number of really good ortho surgeons at Mayo Rochester.

I don’t know hardly anything about hip materials (embarrassing to say, as I am an engineer, lol).  I investigated materials before I met the surgeon, and thought that I knew what I wanted, and he wanted to go in a different direction, and I just left it to him.  I have a metal ball for sure, and I have an advanced, highly cross-linked plastic.  Thinking about a plastic wear surface (polyethylene, no less) gave me a bit of heartburn, but they told me that they now have the data to on this material to say that it will last me for the duration.  I wonder if we both have the same polyethylene cup material.

Trousdale did me a huge favor by steering me clear of metal-metal, which is what was “the latest” at the time, and what sounded the best to me from an engineering standpoint, and what turned out within two years to be a disaster for a number of patients who went that way.  My understanding is that, where there was not excellent alignment or where there was any sort of interference at the far range of motion, there occurred what you might think of as some sort of fretting-like phenomenon that resulted in debris in the joint, which resulted in inflammation.  Lots of people had the problem and I am told that the solution was a two step process - remove the implant and have the patient lie in bed for a few months with no hip joint at all in order to let the inflammation go down, then do the revision with an implant that works.  This sounds gruesome, and I don’t know how true it actually is, but I thank Trousdale that I don’t have to any more than this about it.

Anterior approach.  Yes, it does seem that posterior approach is mostly what I hear about what they do at Mayo.  I don’t know why they seem to favor this, but Trousdale did and I know that others do, too.  Surgeons at Mayo rule the roost, and are free to use whatever they feel is best, as we know since you got the anterior approach, so there cannot be a standard policy on this.  I have one ongoing issue, if you want to call it that, with my hip.  At the time, Trousdale and I discussed the approach.  He told me that the one thing about the posterior approach is that he would have to cut through the piriformis muscle.  I asked him if it would effect golf and he said “only if you swing like Tiger Woods”.  And he was right, it has absolutely no effect on golf.  But, in normal life, there are certain positions that I rarely get into where I just don’t have the strength to perform the movement like I used to.  It is very minor when I experience it, but it is there, and that might be a fundamental difference between the two approaches.  What I wanted was the fastes recovery time that was consistent with a good result, and he told me in spite of what I had heard about anterior being faster this was not true, at least for his patients.  And he put me back on the golf course in six weeks flat, so he had a fair point.  I don’t know what the trade offs are, between the two approaches, other than the piriformis muscle.

For people of your age, they were going into hip resurfacing back when I got my hip.  Now I don’t hear about hip resurfacing.  If they are telling you that your materials will get anywhere near 25-30 years, then you can get through with one revision and that is not a problem because 25+ years from now the materials will be better yet and you will certainly get by with a single revision.  So maybe they don’t need re-surfacing anymore, what with the life of the materials for a full replacement.  Tell me a bit about ceramic.  Why do they use ceramic and not metal?  Did they talk to you about trade offs between the two materials?  Also, what is the role of the vitamins?  I wonder if I have vitamins in my plastic.  Who made your implant?  Mine is DePuy.
The reason for my replacement was Avascuar Necrosis, and Mayo was one of the few places that offered a procedure with stem cells that had a chance at saving my hip or at least prolonging the need for surgery for a number of years. I had that procedure, done by Rafael Sierra in their ortho dept. He also does knee and hip replacements. In my research I came across Trousdale's info and also heard some recommendations for him. The surgery I had didn't work and so I decided to go with a very well known surgeon locally who was recommended by a few people in the medical device industry.

My "parts" were all Zimmer Biomet. The Biolox Delta ceramic head is actually made by another company called CeramTec. Ceramic is favored for its extremely low wear properties as well as its natural lubracative properties.

Here's info on the vitamin e poly i have: http://www.zimmerbio...lyethylene.html

From what I read, resurfacing isn't performed much in the US mostly due to the metal on metal problems mentioned. It also seems that the surgery needs to be much more precise for a good outcome.

I see. I am going to call Trousdale and ask about the poly material. When they told me that they had sufficient data to be able to state that the hip would last me "for the duration" I didn't ask them how long they expect me to live. Now I am curious to know more about the polyethylene.

I have a friend who is younger and went with re-surfacing with Trousdale. Trousdale does them, but I think that my friend had to ask fotpr it. He has had ongoing pain issues.  He since moved to Michigan and saw two different ortho specialists, both I believe at the U of Michigan. He has been checked several times for debris and inflammation in the joint, and there is no problem.  Trousdale had told him that this may go away or it may be permanent, and fortunately it does seem to be going away, but slowly and over years. Interestingly, he got the same reaction from BOTH Michigan docs as I got from the chiropractor  - what a perfectly aligned hip!  Based on my friend, it seems that you as a young person has chosen a better path.


Remove This Advertisement Viewing As Guest

    GolfWRX Forums

    Advertisement


Wanna get rid of this ugly yellow box? And remove other annoying "stuff" in between posts? Create a FREE GolfWRX account here.

30



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

GolfWRX Sponsors