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#1651 agatha

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 12:08 AM

View Postdeadsolid...shank, on 24 September 2017 - 02:44 PM, said:

I can't remember for sure Matt, but you've played Southern Dunes in the past haven't you?

Sorry to respond for him, yes he has, last 2 times for first stage he played there.


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#1652 HoosierMizuno

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 08:32 AM

Does your on course practice differ for rounds where you are on the course you will be playing in a tournament vs on a course that ou have no upcoming tournaments and you are out practicing to get better at golf vs getting to know the course?

When practicing on course, are you keeping score, playing multiple balls, hitting multiple clubs from the tee, replaying only bad shots, or just dropping several balls around the green and practicing your short game?
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#1653 PureStrikes54

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Posted 26 September 2017 - 04:50 PM

Decent start Matt with the 1 under. Was the course playing "relatively" easy today for elite level tournament golf? Never seen a 7,500+ yard course get shredded in tournament play like this. Two guys with double digit birdie counts with guys still on the course.

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#1654 ABARTSCHMID

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 10:28 AM

Go get them today Matt!!!
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#1655 yebritas

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Posted 27 September 2017 - 06:29 PM

I wish you the best of luck in your journey


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#1656 andrieddle

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 01:57 AM

Great thread! Good luck on your quest man!
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#1657 rangersgoalie

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 10:09 AM

Maybe too soon, and sorry if it is, but sorry it didn't go well.  Anybody who has gone through this grind
Of a career knows these are tough days.  
It's been a big year, the Nike changes, some game discoveries, and some good rounds and results.  Sometimes
People don't understand how much timing of when your game comes around will make or break a year.

Rest, recover, reset goals.

It has been said before, but great job on this thread.  I'm certain everyone who follows is eager to see you reach your next
Goals....
Hang in there

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#1658 q-school

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Posted 30 September 2017 - 09:09 PM

Iím not aware of what happened but Iím a big fan.   Keep pushing!   Hope a friendly bounce is right around the corner.    Best wishes.

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#1659 GolfingBro

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 04:10 PM

View Postrangersgoalie, on 30 September 2017 - 10:09 AM, said:

Maybe too soon, and sorry if it is, but sorry it didn't go well.  Anybody who has gone through this grind
Of a career knows these are tough days.  
It's been a big year, the Nike changes, some game discoveries, and some good rounds and results.  Sometimes
People don't understand how much timing of when your game comes around will make or break a year.

Rest, recover, reset goals.

It has been said before, but great job on this thread.  I'm certain everyone who follows is eager to see you reach your next
Goals....
Hang in there

Thank you. For those who didn't follow along at First stage of q school...I had the worst tournament I have had all year.  Golf sucks sometimes and everything can go against you and that happened last week.  My misses ended in terrible places, my putts never went in.  Just an awful week that I will learn from but I will also forget about and move forward.

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#1660 rob0225

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 09:38 PM

View PostGolfingBro, on 20 September 2016 - 12:22 AM, said:

View PostDavePelz4, on 19 September 2016 - 02:41 PM, said:

Matt...how does the Nike decision to leave the equipment business impact you?  Will you continue to wear the apparel?

I will continue to wear apparel.  I have extra balls, gloves and backup irons and wedges.  So in the immediate future I am ok.  I will be trying new balls.  For example I got callaway balls sent to me.  I will try them.  Companies don't have room for developmental tour guys. So I will just get on the PGA tour to get some free clubs again.
Are you able to stock up a bit before they quick making the stuff?


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#1661 GolfingBro

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 11:39 AM

View Postrob0225, on 01 October 2017 - 09:38 PM, said:

View PostGolfingBro, on 20 September 2016 - 12:22 AM, said:

View PostDavePelz4, on 19 September 2016 - 02:41 PM, said:

Matt...how does the Nike decision to leave the equipment business impact you?  Will you continue to wear the apparel?

I will continue to wear apparel.  I have extra balls, gloves and backup irons and wedges.  So in the immediate future I am ok.  I will be trying new balls.  For example I got callaway balls sent to me.  I will try them.  Companies don't have room for developmental tour guys. So I will just get on the PGA tour to get some free clubs again.
Are you able to stock up a bit before they quick making the stuff?

Already beginning the switch to Taylormade stuff, apparel will still be the same Nike stuff.

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#1662 GolfingBro

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 11:44 AM

View PostHoosierMizuno, on 26 September 2017 - 08:32 AM, said:

Does your on course practice differ for rounds where you are on the course you will be playing in a tournament vs on a course that ou have no upcoming tournaments and you are out practicing to get better at golf vs getting to know the course?

When practicing on course, are you keeping score, playing multiple balls, hitting multiple clubs from the tee, replaying only bad shots, or just dropping several balls around the green and practicing your short game?

Yes it is different.  Preparing for a tournament I putt and chip to places either where I know there will be a pin or where I think there will be a pin.  When I am just playing I putt and chip to the hole cut in the greens.  Preparing for a tournament I will aim approach shots to difficult parts of the greens were I think there will be a pin even if the actually cut pin isn't there.  I hit chips and putts that would be very common places for example just below a false front or below a tier.  I get a clear picture on how I want to play that hole for the week and have a plan for certain pins and certain conditions if they change.

Practicing on course I either play for score, hit multiple shots and multiple balls focusing on result and ball flight.  I like to hit 2 drives off the tee (if Im not playing for score) and try to get them right next to each other (practicing consistency).  Sometimes I hit one high and one low tee shot.  Other times I practice I take into account the next tournament I am playing and I hit the clubs I know I will be hitting at that upcoming course.  I drop a couple extra chips around greens too.

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#1663 Matt J

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 11:46 AM

Sorry about the setback Matt.  Stay positive.  Sending you good vibes!



Edited by Matt J, 02 October 2017 - 11:46 AM.


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#1664 ShutSteepStuck

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 12:51 PM

View PostGolfingBro, on 03 August 2017 - 09:21 PM, said:

View PostShutSteepStuck, on 03 August 2017 - 01:34 PM, said:

View PostGolfingBro, on 03 August 2017 - 10:12 AM, said:

View PostShutSteepStuck, on 01 August 2017 - 09:15 PM, said:

Are you familiar with Scott Fawcett's DECADE Course Management Systemf? If so, what are your thoughts?

My swing coach is and I am not.  I hear it helps identify parts of your game that needs improvement using statistics.

More than anything else, it is a formulated course management system. He recommends first learning about his principles and applying them in an emotionless environment, so it may be best to consider these things  after the weekend.

His goal is for golfers to optimize their target selection throughout the bag. He believes his course management principles help a player choose the "optimal target that will produce the lowest score based on distance, hazards [& trees], and hole locations."

The following two links, a youtube video and a podcast, will give you a sense of his approach to course management:



http://www.stitcher....5?autoplay=true

Though we take aim at our target like we are shooting a sniper rifle, Fawcett's point is that our dispersion pattern is more like a shotgun pattern than a sniper rifle. After knowing one's respective dispersion with a particular club (even on a particular day), while being mindful of hazards, trees, pin locations and the short-side, most of the time players should aim toward the center of their dispersion pattern and play aggressively to their spot.

Long story short, if applied consistently and wisely, young professionals can manage their way around the course like similar to a 25 year vet like Jim Furyk or Jerry Kelly.

Awesome, thank you.

Just curious if you have tried implementing any of his course management principles. If so, what were your thoughts? Wishing you the very best this Fall.
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#1665 GolfingBro

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 09:55 PM

View PostShutSteepStuck, on 02 October 2017 - 12:51 PM, said:

View PostGolfingBro, on 03 August 2017 - 09:21 PM, said:

View PostShutSteepStuck, on 03 August 2017 - 01:34 PM, said:

View PostGolfingBro, on 03 August 2017 - 10:12 AM, said:

View PostShutSteepStuck, on 01 August 2017 - 09:15 PM, said:

Are you familiar with Scott Fawcett's DECADE Course Management Systemf? If so, what are your thoughts?

My swing coach is and I am not.  I hear it helps identify parts of your game that needs improvement using statistics.

More than anything else, it is a formulated course management system. He recommends first learning about his principles and applying them in an emotionless environment, so it may be best to consider these things  after the weekend.

His goal is for golfers to optimize their target selection throughout the bag. He believes his course management principles help a player choose the "optimal target that will produce the lowest score based on distance, hazards [& trees], and hole locations."

The following two links, a youtube video and a podcast, will give you a sense of his approach to course management:



http://www.stitcher....5?autoplay=true

Though we take aim at our target like we are shooting a sniper rifle, Fawcett's point is that our dispersion pattern is more like a shotgun pattern than a sniper rifle. After knowing one's respective dispersion with a particular club (even on a particular day), while being mindful of hazards, trees, pin locations and the short-side, most of the time players should aim toward the center of their dispersion pattern and play aggressively to their spot.

Long story short, if applied consistently and wisely, young professionals can manage their way around the course like similar to a 25 year vet like Jim Furyk or Jerry Kelly.

Awesome, thank you.

Just curious if you have tried implementing any of his course management principles. If so, what were your thoughts? Wishing you the very best this Fall.


Today had an end of the year meeting and planning for the 2018.  One of the plans was look into Decade and start implementing it.  I can have updates and my thoughts on this blog once I do.


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#1666 rangersgoalie

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 11:41 PM

Go get em Matt

Trust your instincts!!

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#1667 Chewey85

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 07:50 AM

Stay with it! Excited to watch you succeed in 2018.

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#1668 rwc356

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 10:09 AM

Good Luck for 2018 - looking forward to your thoughts and comments about DECADE and its impact on your game.

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#1669 GolfingBro

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 12:16 PM

Thanks for all the well wishes.  This past week I met with my swing coach to discuss plans moving forward.  Since the last three years my progress has been stagnate we needed to switch up the way I do things.  Attached is the daily practice plan going forward.  I also am keeping a notebook in my bag and writing down my results in order to track them.  Its a switch from what I have been doing because "the definition of insanity is doing the same thing expecting different results"

Attached Files



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#1670 q-school

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 12:21 PM

Thanks for being so open.    Good luck!   Rooting for you


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#1671 Chewey85

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 12:30 PM

Looks solid!

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#1672 ryanpalm

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 02:17 PM

Like others, just recently found the post - really wonderful of you and your mother to take the time you have on this forum. There are many who simply can't live the dream but are fascinated by it (me included, for sure!) and really enjoy following along. Can't say that I knew anything about Mackenzie Tour before this thread (other than its existence) but will be a close follower now.

Wish you the best in the 'offseason' and if you ever find your way to northwestern PA or western NY, you certainly have a place to crash! (We have a web.com event in July about 20 minutes from my home!)

I will think of a number of questions - but can you talk about differences between the Mackenzie and web.com events in terms of field quality, tournament quality, etc.?? As mentioned above, I have been to a few web.com events, but never one up north.

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#1673 GolfingBro

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 10:56 PM

View Postryanpalm, on 14 October 2017 - 02:17 PM, said:

Like others, just recently found the post - really wonderful of you and your mother to take the time you have on this forum. There are many who simply can't live the dream but are fascinated by it (me included, for sure!) and really enjoy following along. Can't say that I knew anything about Mackenzie Tour before this thread (other than its existence) but will be a close follower now.

Wish you the best in the 'offseason' and if you ever find your way to northwestern PA or western NY, you certainly have a place to crash! (We have a web.com event in July about 20 minutes from my home!)

I will think of a number of questions - but can you talk about differences between the Mackenzie and web.com events in terms of field quality, tournament quality, etc.?? As mentioned above, I have been to a few web.com events, but never one up north.

Thank you.

The Mackenzie Tour has shown over the years to breed high quality players that have success on the Web and PGA Tours.  CT Pang, Mackenzie Hughes, JJ Spaun are a few who were on the tour 3 years ago.  And there are many more names who will continue to find success on the higher tours.  

The events are run just as you would see on the Web.com just on a smaller scale due to not enough funding.  There are signs, scorers, spotters and the occasional scoreboard.  The tours goal is to create an environment that is just like what you would see moving up in the ranks.  I myself have not played in the higher events but have been told they are very similar.  The courses we get aren't as nice as the upper tours every week just because it is smaller and doesn't have the money to get the best course in each city.

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#1674 howellhandmade

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 04:15 PM

Reading this story, I am struck by the similarity to professional orchestral music. There may be hundreds of applicants auditioning for one job, and it comes down to a moment in the crucible. A young musician may spend a similar amount as a young pro to travel to an audition, with an instrument that usually costs far more than he can afford, stay in a hotel or crash with friends, and leave with nothing more than the experience. It is wearing, and while the Jordan Spieths of the music world land their jobs before they have to ask themselves how much longer this can go on, the rest struggle along with help from family, part-time employment, freelancing.

While the bitter truth is that not everyone can succeed in making a living playing in an orchestra, or playing golf, I may have a suggestion.

Matthew, I haven't read much in the thread about your mental preparation. I didn't think about it, either, when I was young. But as I got older, and the number of auditions I could reasonably expect to win shrank, I realized that I could not leave my mental state to chance. I noticed that I tended to win auditions that I didn't care about, while jobs I really wanted eluded me. I tended to be in the finals a lot, but never managed to close the deal on a big job. So when I prepared for my audition for the job I now have, I changed dramatically. I determined to leave no stone unturned.

One of the better authors on the mental game, Bob Rotella, is of course a golf guy. I'm sure you've read "Golf is Not a Game of Perfect," which is really the only one you need. I couldn't afford to hire a sports psychologist like him, but I found a local shrink (who I can tell you more about) who made me a Rotella-style tape which changed a lot of mental habits. I read tons of other stuff too, can elaborate later. bulletproofmusician.com would be worth a look. I bought a course subscription and did everything, from assessment to exercises.

My change in mental approach changed how I practiced. I realized that repetition, by itself, is corrosive; repetition simply makes you more comfortable with how you happen to play at the moment. But bad habits creep in, you get used to mistakes, and conditions change. So every practice session had a purpose and a measurement, so that I never played an excerpt without some external reference and some way to score. I also went deep into adversity training. Most musicians prepare with the hope that everything will go perfectly. While sometimes it does, preparation should leave you ready to deal with disaster. I would run on the treadmill until my pulse hit 120, then play. I would pick an old reed out of the discard pile and play on it. I would play for people who made me nervous. I practiced more intensely, not longer, and spent more and more time with mental training. And so on.

One could make the argument that competition is adversity training in itself. The problem is that you only have so many bullets, and you need to shoot that 64 when you're in position to win, or put those days back to back. I won't go on because maybe you're already working on it, but sometimes the mind is what makes the difference, and you can change.

24

#1675 agatha

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 06:09 PM

View Posthowellhandmade, on 15 October 2017 - 04:15 PM, said:

Reading this story, I am struck by the similarity to professional orchestral music. There may be hundreds of applicants auditioning for one job, and it comes down to a moment in the crucible. A young musician may spend a similar amount as a young pro to travel to an audition, with an instrument that usually costs far more than he can afford, stay in a hotel or crash with friends, and leave with nothing more than the experience. It is wearing, and while the Jordan Spieths of the music world land their jobs before they have to ask themselves how much longer this can go on, the rest struggle along with help from family, part-time employment, freelancing.

While the bitter truth is that not everyone can succeed in making a living playing in an orchestra, or playing golf, I may have a suggestion.

Matthew, I haven't read much in the thread about your mental preparation. I didn't think about it, either, when I was young. But as I got older, and the number of auditions I could reasonably expect to win shrank, I realized that I could not leave my mental state to chance. I noticed that I tended to win auditions that I didn't care about, while jobs I really wanted eluded me. I tended to be in the finals a lot, but never managed to close the deal on a big job. So when I prepared for my audition for the job I now have, I changed dramatically. I determined to leave no stone unturned.

One of the better authors on the mental game, Bob Rotella, is of course a golf guy. I'm sure you've read "Golf is Not a Game of Perfect," which is really the only one you need. I couldn't afford to hire a sports psychologist like him, but I found a local shrink (who I can tell you more about) who made me a Rotella-style tape which changed a lot of mental habits. I read tons of other stuff too, can elaborate later. bulletproofmusician.com would be worth a look. I bought a course subscription and did everything, from assessment to exercises.

My change in mental approach changed how I practiced. I realized that repetition, by itself, is corrosive; repetition simply makes you more comfortable with how you happen to play at the moment. But bad habits creep in, you get used to mistakes, and conditions change. So every practice session had a purpose and a measurement, so that I never played an excerpt without some external reference and some way to score. I also went deep into adversity training. Most musicians prepare with the hope that everything will go perfectly. While sometimes it does, preparation should leave you ready to deal with disaster. I would run on the treadmill until my pulse hit 120, then play. I would pick an old reed out of the discard pile and play on it. I would play for people who made me nervous. I practiced more intensely, not longer, and spent more and more time with mental training. And so on.

One could make the argument that competition is adversity training in itself. The problem is that you only have so many bullets, and you need to shoot that 64 when you're in position to win, or put those days back to back. I won't go on because maybe you're already working on it, but sometimes the mind is what makes the difference, and you can change.

Great post, as the "mom" I wholeheartedly agree with what you are saying and interestingly enough there is someone on this thread who is in the profession of mental training who has reached out to him with interested in working with him.  They have scheduled a chat for later in the week to see if its a good fit.  Matthew has worked with people prior, unfortunately he did meet with one early on who was basically a quack and gave him a bad taste in his mouth for the whole thing.

But he also knows there is value in it and has had some very good advise and mental training from others, both on this board and off.  Often times cost is a big factor and now that he is playing on his own dime, its huge.  This offer by this person on here who has interest in golf and helping him has offered to work with him at no cost. Thank you..

To me the timing says everything.  I think that addressing mindset not only in tournaments but all around in training and fitness and learning and reading, is going to be very important to this upcoming year.  All these players at this level are tremendously talented so what is the difference?  Mental- clearly.

I am currently up in Monterey, I asked him to play the Monterey Open because its at Old Del Monte and its lovely with a hyatt hotel on the course.  HIs buddy Jonny (ex caddy for him) is also playing and his mom and are I are good friends, and they got in the same pairing!!! That was total luck..
I don't get to watch him play very often anymore so this is a nice treat for me.


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#1676 rangersgoalie

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 06:53 PM

View Posthowellhandmade, on 15 October 2017 - 04:15 PM, said:

Reading this story, I am struck by the similarity to professional orchestral music. There may be hundreds of applicants auditioning for one job, and it comes down to a moment in the crucible. A young musician may spend a similar amount as a young pro to travel to an audition, with an instrument that usually costs far more than he can afford, stay in a hotel or crash with friends, and leave with nothing more than the experience. It is wearing, and while the Jordan Spieths of the music world land their jobs before they have to ask themselves how much longer this can go on, the rest struggle along with help from family, part-time employment, freelancing.

While the bitter truth is that not everyone can succeed in making a living playing in an orchestra, or playing golf, I may have a suggestion.

Matthew, I haven't read much in the thread about your mental preparation. I didn't think about it, either, when I was young. But as I got older, and the number of auditions I could reasonably expect to win shrank, I realized that I could not leave my mental state to chance. I noticed that I tended to win auditions that I didn't care about, while jobs I really wanted eluded me. I tended to be in the finals a lot, but never managed to close the deal on a big job. So when I prepared for my audition for the job I now have, I changed dramatically. I determined to leave no stone unturned.

One of the better authors on the mental game, Bob Rotella, is of course a golf guy. I'm sure you've read "Golf is Not a Game of Perfect," which is really the only one you need. I couldn't afford to hire a sports psychologist like him, but I found a local shrink (who I can tell you more about) who made me a Rotella-style tape which changed a lot of mental habits. I read tons of other stuff too, can elaborate later. bulletproofmusician.com would be worth a look. I bought a course subscription and did everything, from assessment to exercises.

My change in mental approach changed how I practiced. I realized that repetition, by itself, is corrosive; repetition simply makes you more comfortable with how you happen to play at the moment. But bad habits creep in, you get used to mistakes, and conditions change. So every practice session had a purpose and a measurement, so that I never played an excerpt without some external reference and some way to score. I also went deep into adversity training. Most musicians prepare with the hope that everything will go perfectly. While sometimes it does, preparation should leave you ready to deal with disaster. I would run on the treadmill until my pulse hit 120, then play. I would pick an old reed out of the discard pile and play on it. I would play for people who made me nervous. I practiced more intensely, not longer, and spent more and more time with mental training. And so on.

One could make the argument that competition is adversity training in itself. The problem is that you only have so many bullets, and you need to shoot that 64 when you're in position to win, or put those days back to back. I won't go on because maybe you're already working on it, but sometimes the mind is what makes the difference, and you can change.

no desire to derail, but where are you playing now?  Sax/clarinet/oboe?

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#1677 howellhandmade

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 08:51 PM

View Postrangersgoalie, on 15 October 2017 - 06:53 PM, said:

View Posthowellhandmade, on 15 October 2017 - 04:15 PM, said:

Reading this story, I am struck by the similarity to professional orchestral music. There may be hundreds of applicants auditioning for one job, and it comes down to a moment in the crucible. A young musician may spend a similar amount as a young pro to travel to an audition, with an instrument that usually costs far more than he can afford, stay in a hotel or crash with friends, and leave with nothing more than the experience. It is wearing, and while the Jordan Spieths of the music world land their jobs before they have to ask themselves how much longer this can go on, the rest struggle along with help from family, part-time employment, freelancing.

While the bitter truth is that not everyone can succeed in making a living playing in an orchestra, or playing golf, I may have a suggestion.

Matthew, I haven't read much in the thread about your mental preparation. I didn't think about it, either, when I was young. But as I got older, and the number of auditions I could reasonably expect to win shrank, I realized that I could not leave my mental state to chance. I noticed that I tended to win auditions that I didn't care about, while jobs I really wanted eluded me. I tended to be in the finals a lot, but never managed to close the deal on a big job. So when I prepared for my audition for the job I now have, I changed dramatically. I determined to leave no stone unturned.

One of the better authors on the mental game, Bob Rotella, is of course a golf guy. I'm sure you've read "Golf is Not a Game of Perfect," which is really the only one you need. I couldn't afford to hire a sports psychologist like him, but I found a local shrink (who I can tell you more about) who made me a Rotella-style tape which changed a lot of mental habits. I read tons of other stuff too, can elaborate later. bulletproofmusician.com would be worth a look. I bought a course subscription and did everything, from assessment to exercises.

My change in mental approach changed how I practiced. I realized that repetition, by itself, is corrosive; repetition simply makes you more comfortable with how you happen to play at the moment. But bad habits creep in, you get used to mistakes, and conditions change. So every practice session had a purpose and a measurement, so that I never played an excerpt without some external reference and some way to score. I also went deep into adversity training. Most musicians prepare with the hope that everything will go perfectly. While sometimes it does, preparation should leave you ready to deal with disaster. I would run on the treadmill until my pulse hit 120, then play. I would pick an old reed out of the discard pile and play on it. I would play for people who made me nervous. I practiced more intensely, not longer, and spent more and more time with mental training. And so on.

One could make the argument that competition is adversity training in itself. The problem is that you only have so many bullets, and you need to shoot that 64 when you're in position to win, or put those days back to back. I won't go on because maybe you're already working on it, but sometimes the mind is what makes the difference, and you can change.

no desire to derail, but where are you playing now?  Sax/clarinet/oboe?

Clarinet, Pittsburgh Symphony. For Agatha, my mental training cost $360, total. Just like I recommend that my students read Rotella because it's not really about golf, bulletproofmusician.com is not really about music, completely anyway. I had always worked hard (and I still work hard) on my playing, but I learned a lot with my PSO audition. Previously, I think I worked like a helicopter, or a hot air balloon; I always was able to achieve altitude, but felt like auditions were what happened to me rather than what I made happen. For this audition I became a missile. And I think independence is part of mental training. I'm glad to help, too, to the extent of sharing my sources and process anyway, but I won't intrude.

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#1678 Chewey85

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 01:21 PM

Actually thinking about it I'd say working on the mental aspect of the game could help a golfer at any level. Every thing seems much easier and loose when I'm just goofing around. But for some reason when something is on the line and I get tense it all goes to hell lol.

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#1679 howellhandmade

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 11:30 PM

View PostChewey85, on 16 October 2017 - 01:21 PM, said:

Actually thinking about it I'd say working on the mental aspect of the game could help a golfer at any level. Every thing seems much easier and loose when I'm just goofing around. But for some reason when something is on the line and I get tense it all goes to hell lol.

Yes. But it is a lot of work. It's easy to say, replace negative thoughts with positive ones, but hard to do. We fall into habits of thinking which are extremely persistent. Most people aren't motivated enough to change eating habits. Thinking habits are deeper and more slippery. While it is true that the recreational golfer certainly could save a few strokes in pressure situations by improving the mental game, he has neither the physical skills nor the stakes of the pro. It is important to remember that training your mind does not give you new capabilities, it just makes your best performance more available. When you get to the point where a -3 round just isn't good enough -- or for a musician, where the slightest bobble or lack of conviction means looking for an early flight home -- then the investment makes sense. Everybody wants to be great. Few are willing to pay the price.

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#1680 Chewey85

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 06:23 AM

View Posthowellhandmade, on 16 October 2017 - 11:30 PM, said:

View PostChewey85, on 16 October 2017 - 01:21 PM, said:

Actually thinking about it I'd say working on the mental aspect of the game could help a golfer at any level. Every thing seems much easier and loose when I'm just goofing around. But for some reason when something is on the line and I get tense it all goes to hell lol.

Yes. But it is a lot of work. It's easy to say, replace negative thoughts with positive ones, but hard to do. We fall into habits of thinking which are extremely persistent. Most people aren't motivated enough to change eating habits. Thinking habits are deeper and more slippery. While it is true that the recreational golfer certainly could save a few strokes in pressure situations by improving the mental game, he has neither the physical skills nor the stakes of the pro. It is important to remember that training your mind does not give you new capabilities, it just makes your best performance more available. When you get to the point where a -3 round just isn't good enough -- or for a musician, where the slightest bobble or lack of conviction means looking for an early flight home -- then the investment makes sense. Everybody wants to be great. Few are willing to pay the price.

Well said. I definitely agree. Tell someone don't think about red. First thing that comes to mind is red.


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