2013 best hybrids

There’s a lot fewer long irons played on the PGA Tour these days than in years past. That’s because the pros have realized that some of the long irons they used to play aren’t as consistent as similar-lofted hybrids, which they can also hit higher and farther. Unfortunately, many amatuer golfers haven’t caught on with the trend, and are still using long irons with outdated constructions that make the game more difficult.

We hope that you’ll tell them that the technology in today’s hybrids makes them longer, straighter and better looking than in years past. They also can help fill important distance gaps between a golfer’s fairway woods and long irons. Click here to read GolfWRX Featured Writer Rich Hunt’s story, “The importance of bag setup: Long irons or hybrids.”

We’ve listed our picks for the best hybrids of 2013 below, which for the first time includes several adjustable models that have a lot more “bling” than we’re used to seeing at address.

Click here to read the specifics on the voting committee and how we picked the best.

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Winners

Adams Super LS
Callaway X Hot
Cobra AMP Cell
Ping Anser
Taylormade RBZ Stage 2
Titleist 913H

 

Adams Super LS

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Adams’ Super LS hybrids have titanium faces and crowns to lower their center of gravity, adding forgiveness and playability. They also have Adams’ VST Technology, slots in the sole and crown to give the clubs an insane characteristic time of 250, seven microseconds less than the USGA’s limit.

Those two features together give the Super LS extremely high ball speeds and low-spin launch conditions, making them one of the longest-flying models for mid-to-high-speed golfers. The one deterrent is cost; they’re selling for about $230 at most retailers.

Read Our Full Review

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Callaway X Hot and X Hot Pro

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The Callaway X Hot and X Hot Pro hybrids have a redesigned Callaway Warbird sole that makes them one of the best with dealing with tough lies. Their thin 17-4 stainless steel cup faces also provides tremendous ball speeds and forgiveness, while the matte gray finish and black PVD faces offer a pleasing look at address.

Both the X Hot, which has a larger, more forgiving head design to provide a higher launch and more spin, as well as the X Hot Pro, which has a smaller, less forgiving head design that creates a more penetrating ball flight, received top marks for our panel. Even better news is their current price, which thanks to the end-of-the-season price wars has been lowered from $179 to $129.

Read Our Full Story

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Cobra AMP Cell

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Don’t be fooled by the four color options. Cobra’s AMP Cell hybrids are more than just a fashion statement; they’re one of the easiest to hit hybrids on the market for golfers with slower swing speeds, and have an unrivaled 4-degree range of adjustability.

They come in three different head options: 2-3H (adjustable from 16 to 19 degrees), 3-4H (adjustable from 19 to 22 degrees) and 5-6H (adjustable from 22 to 25 degrees). Along with the four lofts, each head has two “draw” options in the middle lofts, which make the club more upright at address. Like the X Hot hybrids, they’re selling for $129 (about $60 cheaper than their original price).

Read Our Full Story

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Ping Anser

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The Ping Anser hybrids have been around for more than a year, but they continue to be the best model on the market for many golfers. It hasn’t hurt that Brandt Snedeker used a 20-degree Anser hybrid to win the 2011 PGA Tour FedEx Cup Playoffs, and that Phil Mickelson won this year’s British Open with a 17-degree Anser.

The Anser’s success is based on its balanced design. The lower-lofted hybrids have a low, deep CG to help golfers hit the ball higher, while the higher-lofted hybrids have a more forward CG to help prevent ballooning. Its matte black-painted crown was also a favorite of our testers, as was its solid, traditional feel.

Read Our Full Story

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TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2

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Low and forward. That’s TaylorMade’s mantra for more distance, which means that the RBZ Stage 2 and Stage 2 Tour hybrids have a lower, more forward CG than their predecessors.

Like Callaway’s X Hot and X Hot Pro hybrids, the Stage 2 models target different types of golfers. The Stage 2 is slightly larger and higher spinning to help golfers with slower swing speeds hit the ball higher. The Stage 2 Tour offers a flatter trajectory, but its 3-degree adjustable hosel gives golfers to ability to tweak ball flight to their preference.

Both models use TaylorMade’s “RocketSteel” faces, which along with the company’s improved “Speed Pocket” (the slot in the sole) creates more ball speed on shots hit across the face.

Read Our Full Story

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Titleist 913H and 913H.d

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Titleist’s 913H and 913H.d give golfers the total package when it comes to hybrid design. The 913H has a slightly larger head with a more rearward center of gravity that produces slightly more spin and forgiveness than the 913H.d, which has a smaller head and a more forward CG to increase workability and offer a more penetrating flight.

Both models include Titleist’s SureFit Hosel, which offers 16 different loft, lie and face angle combinations, and come with two of the company’s interchangeable sole weights to allow golfers to tune swing weight. Our testers like the 913H and 913H.d’s traditional look and feel, as well as the premium stock shaft options: Mitsubishi’s Diamana S+ 72, D+ 82 and Aldila’s RIP Phenom 80. They retail for $229.

Read Our Full Story

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Click here to see the “Best of” winners for other club categories.

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34 COMMENTS

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  1. Had a stage 2 rescue both Tour and non Tour 3 and wasn’t overly impressed. It was no better than the rescue 11 for me which was no better than the TP 09 rescue. Switched to the Super 9031 and Super DHy and I am much more impressed by the workability both from the tee and the performance out of the rough.

  2. I have a driver swing speed of around 109 and I’m a high ball hitter. I have never played a round since with anyone that has outhit my hybrids with a 3 or 2 iron. Back up to the tips and you’ll see your foursomes long irons fail them.

  3. I think wrx ought to divvy this up into Player’s and Regular Joe’s Hybrids. I find the Stage 2 unfriendly and inconsistent, and that flattish sole helps no one out of trouble.

    Titleist is a winner because it puts a variety of decent shafts on its clubs.

    Cally XHot is a nice addition, Cobra looks good, the Adams Super S fits a normal guy – But if I was going with a regular Joe hybrid it would be the XHot and the Bobby Jones Hybrid (white). Similar in construction, but the BJones has a more rounded sole and a better standard shaft. Nice club in 25 and 30 for normal Joes. Trying out the 21 now.

  4. Have two hybrids that get their fair share of time at the course, TaylorMade proto, very small high toe, and sound great. (2/16.5 4/22.1) I feel like I’m cheating when I use them as you get a very consistent predictable ball flight, that being said, sucks when I pull one for 712u (3), but that’s an awesome weapon as well.

      • You a e so int resting! I don’t think I’ e t uly read a ighnetling like th s befor . So good to find sοm one with om un que thoughts on th s sub ect. Seriously.. m ny thanks for starting this up. This web site issomething that is neede on th web, s meone ith little origin lity!

      • Just purchased a new set of women’s Adams Idea a7OS 14 Pc. Women’s Integrated Set of clubs. Went to the links with fnried. Boy, was hse surprised at how much better my game had improved. I could a much highter lift on the ball with the drivers. The grip was so much more compfortable to play with. I would highly reccommend them to the next women looking to up her game of golf.

  5. I use to be a long iron player – no hybrids in my bag! Then I tempered my ego and put the hybrids and long irons to a test. I really hated the fact that the hybrids were more consistent than my long irons – I had to swallow my pride and give up the long irons for the game improving/scoring hybrids.

  6. I put in the new Xhot hybrid which was the first hybrid to replace my original TM rescues. I also have the Adams DHY in my bag love both clubs. You should all try the feel off the Adams DHY.

  7. “I’m on GOLFWRX, i don’t like hybrids!”….Please.lol
    Keep bangin those 3-irons boys!. If you’re not hitting them well, its a flaw in your swing, not the club. IMO you’re a fool to not take advantage of this technology. I play to a 3.3 index, I don’t have an iron lower than a six iron. Graeme McDowell doesn’t play an iron lower than a five. Are you better than him?. No, you’re not. Buy some hybrids….

    • I don’t think I’m a fool. I just don’t have trouble hitting my 3 iron. When I do hit a bad one, no hybrid would save me anyway. When I do start to struggle with it, I’ll buy a G25 3 iron or similar. I just prefer to hit a 3 iron instead of a hybrid. Nothing wrong with that in my book. You hit you’re hybrids and I’ll keep hitting my 3 iron thanks.

    • I’m no fool either but the thing about the two for me is this. I love hitting a 3 iron off the tee but I rarely have the opportunity where a 3 iron is better off the tee than my 2 hybrid or a 3 wood. I have a 2&3 hybrid in the bag. I love hitting an iron and nailing my J40 CB off the tee is fun but my choked 2H is longer just as straight and more consistent because I sometimes I miss a little.
      That said smoking a 3 iron off the tee and then hitting it again for the 2nd on a par 5 makes my friends crazy and me exceptionally smug and happy.

  8. i used to use the nike covert hybrid but then i tried the taylormade RBZ stage2 it went strait in the bag hitting 250 yards with it very forgiving . saying that my mate has the callaway x hot and he got 277 yards out of that
    both great hybrids .

  9. unfortunately i prefer the look of an iron in a hybrid but at my moderate swing speed (85mph 6 iron, 100mph driver) and lower ball flight…the iron looking hybrids design characterisitcs leave me out in the cold.

    • Have you tried being fitted for a Wishon 775HS? High COR and accuracy, with an excellent sound and feel.
      I was also extremely sceptical about hybrids and had to be persuaded by my fitter to have a 21 degree included in my set. The club he made was so consistent and easy to play out of a range of lies that I’ve since gone back to him to replace the 4 iron and 4 wood with the same design…

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