Don't miss

Keep Your Eye Line Parallel to the Target Line

by   |   May 5, 2013
John Daly eye line

It makes me incredulous that this topic is never talked about. I say never in the context that I have never seen anyone as good looking or smooth with the ladies as myself, but I know this mythical figure probably exists.

Apple fights in the monkey cage at the zoo are conducted with more civility than debates over inconsequential topics like how much forearm rotation Hogan had between P6 and P8, yet an extremely important and fundamental topic like eye line gets no play at all.

I will start with a question. What would you think about basketball players shooting free throws with their eyes tilted 45 degrees from the rim? Now, this might have been the cure for Shaquille O’Neal’s woes, but for most, it would be a complete disaster.

How many bad guys would a CIA sniper take out if his scope was not mounted parallel to the gun barrel?

One could say both of these questions seem rhetorical to the point of being ridiculous. I agree, so why then do hoards of golfers tilt their eye line as much as 45 degrees off the target line with barely a mention anywhere, or by anyone?

It boggles the mind in the same sense as why you park on a driveway and drive on a parkway.

Kenny-600x450

Kenny Perry

  • Bobby Jones, who “over rotated.”
  • Jack Nicklaus who tilted his head away from the target to trigger his back swing.
  • John Daly whose back swing scoffs at convention.
  • The mighty Monte Scheinblum, who won a world long drive title without enough muscle to bench press a sleeve of golf balls.
Monte-600x450

Your author

All of them kept their eye line parallel to the target line.

Even Kenny Perry, who lifts and basically turns his his entire back perpendicular to the target line, barely shifts his eye line a few degrees right and he is the extreme.

I see eye lines all day long that start as much as 45 degrees to the right. I can hear the minions of the morass saying, “So what?”

To put it simply, the arms and the turn of the body will follow where the eyes are looking and swing the club there. Without getting into a dissertation about all of the swing faults a poor eye line causes, let’s just look at two simple, common and easy to understand ones.

  1. The head starts tilted, so the right ear (right-handed golfer) is tilted too far toward the right shoulder. Guess what? The arms follow that line too far to the inside on the back swing. That tilt of the head makes it awkward to properly shift into left side, so the arms reroute over the top. Well folks, your two choices in that pattern are a slice, or your friends are going to make you feel like you are skeet shooting. ”PUUUUUUULL!!!!!!!”
  2. The head and eye line start OK, but the head tilts to the right at the top of the swing because the golfer is trying to make a “full turn.” Assuming the body shifts and turns in the transition properly, the arms get trapped inside trying to follow the eye line. They fly out away from the body, the body stalls and the hands flip. Captain Hook.

This issue is extremely easy to fix and always pays immediate dividends. Put an alignment stick just outside the ball as a frame of reference. Get setup and put the club shaft you are holding on the bridge of your nose across your eyes and see where you are. If need be, change your head position until your eyes are parallel to that alignment stick. When you swing, make sure your eyes stay parallel to that stick. Have a friend help you out if need be.

I have yet to see one person who didn’t improve the path of their arm swing (on both the back swing and downswing) the very first time they fixed their head and eye line position.

For all those wanting to tell me sob stories about being old or inflexible: your back swing is too long. Shorten it and fix you eye line.

About

1992 World Long Drive Champion
Nike Tour (Web.com) player
Instructor at Oak Creek Golf Club, Irvine, Calif.
YouTube channel: hititlong
Blog: http://montescheinblum.com
Online lessons: http://swingfix.golfchannel.com/instructors/monte-scheinblum


11 Comments

  1. Milhouse

    May 15, 2013 at 12:17 pm

    I totally disagree!

    Your neck does not have 180 degrees of range of motion. To put it another way, you cannot simply turn your head far enough to get your chin over your shoulder. You’ll be 15-20 degree short of this.

    So if you consider a full shoulder turn is important (which I think is a misnomer in the golf community since your “shoulders” do not move really, it’s your rib cage and torso that needs to turn 90 degrees, but I digress), then your head and eyes won’t be able to stay parallel to the target line. You’ll either turn your chest only 75-80 degrees in trying to keep your eye line parallel to your target line, or your eyeline, using your pencil on bridge of nose idea, will have to aim 20 or so degrees out to the right for your chest to have cleared out of the way and made a full 90 degree turn.

    I completely disagree with your premise and would argue that trying to keep your eyeline as you have defined it as being on a vertical plane parallel to the target line, would be MORE likely to cause a golfer to come over the top. In trying to keep the eyes parallel, a golfer is more likely to end up with his head ahead of the ball or at least on top of it. This will result in a swing path from out to in, across the ball.

    Taking the club back to the inside is an issue of trying to wind up around the body and hit the ball, not of the eyeline. Aim your sight line 45 degrees to right if you want – you can STILL take the club back on plane. But the causality you suggest is just incorrect and the sports analogies you make don’t parallel the point either.

    • Monte Scheinblum

      May 15, 2013 at 1:46 pm

      All empirical evidence to the contrary.

  2. Jay

    May 13, 2013 at 6:17 pm

    I would really like to understand this concept. Do you have any pictures or videos to illustrate this? I know, especially on the driver, I tilt my spine (reverse K), tilting my head and my eye line away from parallel. Do I tilt my spine then tilt my head up straight again to keep my eyeline parallel? Please help. Thanks.

    • Monte Scheinblum

      May 14, 2013 at 11:07 am

      It doesn’t matter if you tilt your spine for a reverse K. The eyeline is still going to be down the target line if you do it correctly. It will just be pointed more toward the sky, but still on the same vertical plane.

      Lets say you had a pencil on the bridge of your nose with the eraser pointed down the target line. If you tilted your head away like Nicklaus, the eraser would point more toward ground and a Reverse K, the eraser would be pointed more toward sky, but still down target line and not well out to the right.

  3. STICKS

    May 10, 2013 at 1:38 am

    i dont understand fully and i realy want to

  4. STEVE ALMO

    May 8, 2013 at 1:34 pm

    Excellent Monte! …AND ALIGNMENT TO TARGET!

  5. Steve Pratt

    May 7, 2013 at 11:35 pm

    Good stuff, Monte!

  6. geoff duncan

    May 7, 2013 at 6:16 pm

    Great advice. I just hit a bucket and it works.

  7. John Kelly

    May 7, 2013 at 3:20 pm

    great advice. will take it to my next tournament!

  8. John Forster

    May 7, 2013 at 3:11 pm

    Great article. I had never thought about my eyeline.

  9. Pingback: Latest GolfWrx article. | Monte Scheinblum's Blog

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>