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GolfRedefined aims to make club swapping easier

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There is a fair chance that the average GolfWRX reader has a few drivers hidden in their closets.

Maybe they are tucked away so the wife doesn’t find them and then have the nerve to ask you why you have four different drivers that say “Superfast” on them, yet you still refuse to buy anything but discounted detergent while buying groceries. Or maybe that is just me. But if you have more Callaway Razr’s than disposable ones, GolfRedefined thinks it has the solution for you.

GolfRedefined.com is a new exchange-based website offering golfers the option of signing up, paying a monthly fee and then requesting and trading for their choice of a large selection of fairly current drivers (just drivers for now). The selection and monthly fees are dependent on one of the three different packages you choose.

The monthly pricing starts at $24.95 per month or $69.95 per quarter for what is called the “birdie” program, and this, like all membership levels, allows you to request any driver that falls into that package, and then trade it for others basically an unlimited amount of times as long as you are a member. There is a shipping fee of around $12 to $15 as well that gets tacked on for each new driver you receive, while sending them back included pre-paid shipping.

Stepping up a notch in terms of driver selection, there is a “hole in one” plan as well that will bill you just under $100 quarterly and give you access to the newest drivers on the market. Then there is the “eagle” plan that will set you back just under $40 a month and is targeted at seasonal golfers.

Annually, the “eagle plan” would cost more than the “hole in one plan,” while offering an older selection of drivers. But it gives golfers the option of paying monthly, while the “hole in one” plan mandates that golfers make a quarterly commitment.

Obviously the idea with this site is to capitalize on the fact that many golfers like to tinker with a lot of drivers. Its target market is likely the guy who is tired of buying a $399 driver and then seeing a commercial promising him more distance or forgiveness, and not really being able to afford shelling out more money to try it out. Or of course the guy who loves his driver one day, and then wants to wrap it around a tree the next when he misses 10 fairways.

With GolfRedefined, you could change your current driver for another without paying full retail. And with an “eagle” package, you’d have access to basically any big name driver on the market including the new ones. Sounds great on paper if you are an obsessive tinkerer, and the website touts its merits in its FAQ section. But the math does make for some interesting things to ponder.

First off, there are a couple of reasons I couldn’t join. The service is only offered to the continental U.S. and it currently does not offer left-handed clubs. So while GolfRedefined is not a possibility for me right now, I wonder if it would be if I happened to be a right-handed golfer from say, Minnesota (I like people from Minnesota, they pronounce their “o” like we do, and thus they are all honorary Canadians in my book), would this service interest me?

Well, the “birdie” package costs roughly $300 a year and the drivers offered to those consumers is a mix of relatively new but not current models (Ping G15, Cleveland TL310, Taylormade R11, Diablo Octane to name a few). The website’s FAQ also says the average client makes about four trades a year which would bring the total to roughly $360 if I factor in shipping charges. So would I pay $360 for this service, to use four drivers in 2013?

To be honest, probably not, as I actually already own three of the four drivers I listed above (a G15, Tl310 and Octane) and my local golf store still has all of them new for between $95 and $150 factoring in U.S. conversion. I just bought my Cleveland TL310 for $95. You could buy two or three brand-new drivers offered in the “birdie membership” for less than the price of a year’s payments. And they are yours, you own them and can trade them in later for credit. You can’t do that if you have to return them to the site. So the price point of that program is maybe a bit of a concern.

The top-of-the-line “hole in one” program might make a bit more sense to a hardcore club-swapper. If you keep your membership for a year you’d pay roughly $400 plus the shipping dues. That would bring you to roughly $460 a year if you are an average member making about four trades. That is more expensive than almost any premium driver on the market but if you planned on using three or four a year, as well as upgrading every year, I could see how that might be appealing to someone who always wants to try something new, and maybe have a status club in the bag. But I could also see how if you ever found something you really liked and wanted to stick with it, you’d feel you were spending a lot to use it. Though I suppose people who stick with drivers is not really GolfRedefined’s target audience.

Speaking of target audience, I also wonder about whether the obsessive tinkerer has much use for a completely stock driver. For example, he site does not reference an ability to change the grip, adjust the length, or hot melt/lead tape the head for swing weight purposes. This might not be a problem for 99 percent of the golfers out there, but obsessive tinkerers seem to comprise the main target market of this website. I wonder how many players out there switch drivers four times a year but also want to play them all completely stock?

I would also be interested in hearing reviews of actual members. While the FAQ section seems to be geared heavily at customer satisfaction, it is also pretty vague in regards to stocking levels and damage policy. The site does promise to try to have all new drivers in stock at all times, but there is no guarantee of turnaround time. There is also no guarantee that the shaft flex of your choice will be available either. Do they stock more regular then stiff? Any X flex? These also might be concerns for the compulsive tinkerer. As far as the damage policy goes, you are covered for “everyday” wear and tear but I’m not sure what that is. What about skymarks? The site promises all clubs are in “new” or “new like” condition. If I skymark a driver do they throw it out? Do I get charged for it?

OK, I’ve been a bit tough on GolfRedefined, but in all fairness, with any program you are never tied in to anything long term (the longest commitment seems to be three months) and you can quit at any time. In the end, spending $25 to $40 a month to try out a bunch of drivers and see where it goes could be fun. The site does say that if you decide you want to keep a driver, they will sell it to you and allow you to cancel when your term is up. So there is that. I could also see this being of value to someone who only plays a few months a year, wants to use a $350 driver, but doesn’t want to pay for one. If you take the “hole in one” membership and pay $100 for three months, you could use a Ping G25 this golf season for only $100. That isn’t bad.

Feel free to check out the site for yourselves and form your own opinions (click here). Worst case you have another option of how to go about acquiring clubs, and for any golfer, that is a good thing.

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Jeff Singer was born and still resides in Montreal, Canada. Though it is a passion for him today, he wasn't a golfer until fairly recently in life. In his younger years Jeff played collegiate basketball and football and grew up hoping to play the latter professionally. Upon joining the workforce, Jeff picked up golf and currently plays at a private course in the Montreal area while working in marketing. He has been a member of GolfWRX since 2008

11 Comments

11 Comments

  1. JKratz

    May 9, 2013 at 7:45 am

    Just learn how to use an auction site. Buy and sell the drivers you want/don’t want. You may incur some losses, but not a monthly fee. And…you may even MAKE money if you know what you’re doing!

  2. Tyson

    May 1, 2013 at 1:48 pm

    In Canada where did you get your drivers for 95-150$?

  3. Spencer

    Apr 25, 2013 at 1:47 pm

    I got as far as “Monthly fee” before I stopped reading.

  4. kloyd0306

    Apr 25, 2013 at 5:27 am

    This will fail because it’s dumb…….

  5. Flip4000

    Apr 23, 2013 at 9:46 am

    If your a golfer who cares about spending extra money on after market shafts, your probably someone who doesn’t buy 3-4 drivers per year and therefore the program doesn’t appeal to you. I think its more for the guy who maybe is a little older or the single post college grad with a little bit of income to throw around or someone who just likes to try the latest and greatest drivers rather than trying to fully customize a driver to their game.

    Look, when you rent a car, they dont let you pick any custom rims or aftermarket parts to put under the hood, nor should it matter since its a RENTAL,this program is the same concept. if your someone who wants to custom build a club just for “you”, then just continue buying clubs at store or online for a discount and throwing whatever expensive shaft you feel like on it.

    I think its more for the person who cant make it out to a demo day or doesn’t have access to a demo day in order to try a club on the course and see how it may or may not fit their game. we have all hit a driver on a simulator and said to ourselves “psh, clearly i drive the ball farther than this” or ” oh sure i hit it good at the store but what would it look like on the course”. With this program you basically get to have your own demo day at your course when ever you feel like it, which i think is kinda cool. I am not someone who really cares about the latest and greatest so i wouldn’t ever use this program but i can see the market for it

    i think the target market was mis represented in this article;it appeals more for the guy who sees the new Taylormade driver is in stores and immediately heads down to golf galaxy to take on the latest yard challenge rather than people who take time to tinker with their clubs. Just my thoughts

    • Blanco

      Apr 23, 2013 at 11:35 pm

      I guess those guys do exist… but looking at the web site, in particular the Anser Driver… has four stock shaft options that are completely different in every way. Not only are you prevented from selecting a specific shaft, you aren’t even made aware of the shaft you’re choosing.

  6. Blanco

    Apr 23, 2013 at 2:18 am

    Nice idea. Poorly thought out.

  7. justplay

    Apr 22, 2013 at 8:59 pm

    sounds dumb!!!

  8. J

    Apr 21, 2013 at 9:15 pm

    No shaft options mentioned on their website.

    So this is a service that lets you try out completely stock, bare bones drivers.

    Nope.
    Their not offering custom shafts and custom lengths, different grip types… All of the stuff that their target audience would be after means failure.

    You want ” tinkeres ” to use your clubs? Offer more than stock. Period.

  9. Trevor

    Apr 21, 2013 at 7:59 pm

    I don’t like the idea at all. Seems almost scam-like and why not try them out the store before buying them anyway?

  10. Ronald Montesano

    Apr 21, 2013 at 1:23 pm

    Key words: disposable income!

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