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Tech Talk: UST Recoil Graphite Iron Shafts

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In the last decade, graphite has become the material of choice on the PGA Tour for the shafts in drivers, fairway woods and hybrids.

It would make sense that graphite shafts would slowly have started to creep into irons as well, but almost every top player on Tour is still using steel shafts in his irons and wedges.

Mike Guerrette, vice president of brand development and Tour operations for UST Mamiya, said the reason why graphite shafts haven’t become popular with Tour players in their irons was because of a problem with their design.

According to Guerette, graphite iron shafts of the past had walls that were too thick, which decreased ovaling and resulted in poor energy transfer. That resulted in less feel and less distance — two things that never go together on Tour.

UST’s new Recoil iron shafts are made with denser graphite fibers that allowed engineers to decrease wall thickness. Because the fibers are denser, the shafts can be made as heavy as 110 to 125 grams, the weight range that is preferred on Tour. Click this link to read more about the Recoil Shafts. 

Check out the video below, where Guerrette explains in detail the construction and benefits of the new shafts, which he says will give golfers more distance and a better feel than steel.

Read more and join the discussion in the forums

[youtube id=”yxA4LqQpKN0″ width=”620″ height=”360″]

Read more and join the discussion in the forums

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16 Comments

16 Comments

  1. Rick

    Mar 6, 2015 at 2:00 pm

    Why should I take your word? Haven’t even heard your story. Have not seen any reviews on the 800 or 600 series but I’m sure they r out there.

  2. Mike Boatright

    Oct 6, 2014 at 3:25 pm

    I like this concept but what I fear is breakage with let’s say a 9 iron over time. Your hitting down pretty hard vs a driver that never sees much ground impact.

  3. Mike

    Jan 26, 2014 at 7:41 pm

    I purchased these shafts, F4, in the Callaway Apex irons. I own a Trackman, here’s the numbers with a 7i, club speed 83.6, ball speed 120.5, spin rate 5970, carry 177.5, total 185.9, launch angle 19.2, dynamic loft 24.1, spin loft 26.5, smash factor 1.44, angle of attack -2.2. Five shots all about the same. Look at ball position to adjust height, spin, carry, etc. Shafts feel great. Would love to feel these in my Ping S55’s with the 110 shaft and see the numbers. These shafts don’t feel like the graphite I’ve tried, tip soft, launch high. I know where the club is, I can feel it.

  4. Gerald

    Feb 18, 2013 at 3:43 pm

    This sounds like the same comments I heard when people were being asked to put down their persimmon woods and try metal heads.

  5. JEFF

    Jan 31, 2013 at 12:37 pm

    I shot a 68 yesterday with my crappy DG X 100 STEEL shafts. I got them for 6.00 each!

  6. Bill Gabbert

    Jan 31, 2013 at 12:27 pm

    Do your homework fellows. You can buy these shafts from Hireko Golf fo only 44.99. And if you haven’t tried them maybe some people on here should try them first before you write such negative comments on a product that might just changed your golf game. I have one coming to demo in an extra TM 7 iron.

  7. Sean

    Jan 30, 2013 at 9:00 pm

    I’d be very interested in these shafts, but the price is a bit out of my reach.

  8. Pingback: Graphite Iron Shafts??? | Golf ETC in Hilton Head

  9. Chris

    Jan 28, 2013 at 9:21 pm

    Wow – lots of negative comments. Have any of the previous people actually hit one of these? They feel great, the offer many of the positives of steel shafts without the negative vibrations. We’ve only had the demos in our shop for a couple of weeks and have already had a couple of “steel only” guys that don’t need or want a lighter weight shaft, make the switch after picking one up. They loved the distance, improved dispersion and feel. Maybe give them a shot???

    • S

      Jan 31, 2013 at 2:34 am

      I would love to, if you could sell each shaft for around $30, I would do it. $125 is a bit much, especially when there is nothing wrong with steel

  10. Scott

    Jan 28, 2013 at 3:54 pm

    If these are so great why aren’t PGA Tour players playing them? Two guys on the Senior Tour are playing them, but that’s what they were always made for: old people.

  11. Famous Davis

    Jan 28, 2013 at 1:21 pm

    The opening sentence of the article is a hoot. In the last decade, graphite has become the material of choice on the PGA Tour for the shafts in drivers, fairway woods and hybrids. Like graphite wasn’t already the default choice in 1998? GMAFB. To see my ungodly ballstriking for yourself, just come out to Admiral Baker any Tuesday. I’m the guy in the dumpy khakis.

  12. Desmond

    Jan 28, 2013 at 9:21 am

    I like his hair, wish he spoke English instead of terminology. When he discussed torque towards the end, he reverted back to English. Interesting concept – they should go down to lighter weights and give Aerotech a run…

  13. G

    Jan 28, 2013 at 2:34 am

    It has NOTHING to do with DESIGN. It’s all to do with COST!

    Why would you want to pay $125 PER SHAFT for your irons!!!!!! That’s INSANE.

    • Andy

      Jun 13, 2013 at 7:52 am

      They are worth every penny! Take my word for it.

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Equipment

Tiger Woods opts for lead tape on his Newport 2 rather than a heavier putter: Here’s why it makes sense

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After days of speculation about which putter Tiger Woods might end up with an attempt to tame the greens at Royal Portrush, we now officially know he settled on his old faithful GSS Scotty Cameron but with a twist—some added lead tape.

The whole reason the speculation was in high gear early in the week was because of Tiger was spotted with a new custom Scotty that had the Studio Select weights in the sole to increase head weight to help with slow greens, something Tiger has talked about in the past—especially when it comes to the greens at The Open Championship.

We can even look back a few years ago when Tiger finally put a Nike putter in play, the original Method (those were nice putters) and talked about both the increased head weight and the grooves on the face to help get the ball rolling on slower greens.

The decision to stick with the old faithful with added lead tape goes beyond just a comfort level, even if the two putters look the same at address, it’s about feel and MOI around the axis.

Let me explain. Sure the putter heads weight the same, but depending on where the mass is located it will change the MOI. The putter with the Select weights vs. lead tape in the middle will have a higher MOI because there is more weight on the perimeter of the head—it’s like a blade vs. cavity back iron. Sure, two 7-irons can weigh the same but the performance will vary significantly.

For a player with such deft feel like Tiger Woods, any change like that can could cause doubt. Tweaking an already great putting stroke and on the eve of the last major of the year is not really something you want to do, which is why it isn’t surprising he stuck with his legendary Newport 2.

Lead tape in the middle allows Tiger to increase the head weight with very little change to the natural rate of rotation for hit putter and hopefully manage the slower Portrush greens better.

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Your optimal wedge set-up?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from ClevelandKyle who brings up the subject of wedge set-ups. In the thread, our members discuss what wedges they like to carry as well as answering ClevelandKyle’s question: “If you had to carry two wedges for the rest of your life, what would they be (degree, make, model) and why?”

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • SEP1006: “PW / GW – 0311P PXG GEN 2, same as irons. 54/12 and 58/06 – Ping Glide Stealth 2.0: best wedges I’ve ever played by far, very versatile.”
  • cardoustie: “Like the OP, I keep going back to old school Vokey sm2’s .. 50/54/60. TVD m grinds. No wedge spins it as well or feels as good. I am ordering a Glide 3.0 eye 2 58 though.”
  • manoagolfer: “Vokey 48, 54, 58 and 62. Just added the 62 for the short stuff around the greens and steep faced bunkers.”
  • BCULAW: “RTX4 Raw 46 mid, 50 mid, 56 full, 60 low. After playing Vokeys almost exclusively for the last ten years or so, these Clevelands have been a real eye-opener. Spin is greatly increased, and the grind on the 60 is stellar. Highly recommended.”

Entire Thread: “Your optimal wedge set-up?”

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “1 or 2-iron recommendations?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from Afor1991 who is on the hunt for a 1 or 2-iron after having no luck with hybrids. With a swing speed in the low 100s, Afor1991 is confident he has the speed and consistency to make a 1 or 2-iron work for him, and our members have been giving him their best suggestions in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • boggyman: “1st generation TM UDI 16* hard to beat with right shaft for a 1-iron, IF you could find one. Used mine in a set of OL Cobras for a while. Need to re-shaft it now though.”
  • Pepperturbo: “I have been effectively using T-MB 17* 2 iron since it was introduced. Now and again put my old Mizuno Pro 16* 1 iron in the bag to remind me those clubs require a good swing. Good luck with your choice.”
  • joelsim: “It depends on how much you value consistency over distance. And of course what your handicap is. I don’t have an official handicap but am regularly scoring in the 70s at my home club, at most 85 if I have a really bad day. And I tried a UDI #2 a couple of weeks ago and sold it a day later. Will stick to my G400 #4 Iron at power spec 19*. Gives me 195y carry consistently with run out according to ground hardness. So far it beats G and G400 Crossovers, Cobra King Utility and TM UDI #2 hands down.”
  • wam78: “Currently playing Mizuno mp h5 2 iron and I absolutely love it! Feels good, easy to hit high and low and can be found for a good price.”

Entire Thread: “1 or 2-iron recommendations?”

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