Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

So your kid wants to play golf…

Published

on

If you’re a non-golfer and your son or daughter is talking about taking up golf, this article is for you! To help you navigate the problem, I have teamed with my friends at Operation 36. We hope to provide the basic information you needed about when you should start your children, why Operation 36 works, and what type of investment parents might need to make in introducing their children to golf.

When should I start?

If you have the choice, start younger rather than older. Yes, that’s a broad statement, I understand that. However, if your kid waits until they are 13 to start playing the game, they have a significantly steeper mountain to climb than someone who started at 8. In many cases, starting to play at 13 makes it virtually impossible to play high school or college golf if that is the goal.

In Anders Ericsson’s landmark book “Peak – Secrets From the New Science of Expertise,” he states, “Pretty much anyone can develop with the right exposure and training. Nearly everyone with perfect pitch (expertise) began training at a very young age.”

Why Operation 36 Works

The core of Operation 36 is to develop on-course skills or scoring. Players start immediately on the golf course at 25 yards with a goal of playing 9 holes in a score of 36. When they accomplish their golf, they move away from the hole with the goal of being able to shoot 36 from the white tees.

The mission was founded on the premise that once a player writes down a score and believes they can improve that score with practice, they quickly become hooked! In the program, these players are supported by a coach who delivers weekly lessons to them with a long-term curriculum. They also get a mobile app to track progress, socialize with players in their Academy and motivate them to play and practice outside of class.

Although the premise sounds simple, Operation 36 is effective because it helps young golfers develop sound skills. This includes internal locus of control (or motivation), self-awareness, grit, and focus. The results are that kids feel empowered and engaged in their pursuits each week, which creates a magical connection to the game of golf.

What’s this gonna cost?

Here are the average costs associated with enrolling your child in an Operation 36 program. We have broken the costs into 2 groups; Phase 1 and Phase 2. Phase 1 is a time where your child is learning to build both a passion for golf and learning the basic skills. Based on 11 years of experience, the average player takes about 3-5 years to get back to the front tees. Now that your student has accomplished shooting 36 from the front tees, they are ready to enter Phase 2. In Phase 2, the player’s goal is to shoot 36 or better all the way to the back tee’s at your facility and start playing in junior tournaments.

Phase 1: Introduction to Golf

The costs include weekly classes and bi-weekly 9-hole events. In this graphic, we are assuming a 6-month commitment to golf which would include (24) classes and (12) 9-hole events per calendar year.

Phase 2: Tournament Player

As your junior golfer decides to take their passion to the next level, the costs associated with things like coaching, tournaments, and equipment will increase, looking something like this:

Please note: Not all players want to move on to becoming a tournament player. Some players might want to continue to engage in Phase 1 because their motivations better align with the values of this program.

I hope this article helps parents have realistic expectations of the costs associated with introducing their children to golf. With this knowledge, we can start to make more educated decisions.

If you are interested in learning more about Operation 36, please visit the website to find a location near you with a coach that is specifically interested in helping your child fall in love with playing the game of golf.

Your Reaction?
  • 12
  • LEGIT5
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP3
  • OB0
  • SHANK8

Brendan is the owner of Golf Placement Services, a boutique business which aims to apply his background in golf and higher education to help educate players, their families and coaches about the process! Website - www.golfplacementservices.com Insta - golf.placement.sevices Twitter @BMRGolf

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: A discussion of swingweight (Part 1: History)

Published

on

Image via Golfworks

For the twenty-five plus years, I’ve been in the equipment business, one of the most commonly-asked-about subjects is that of swingweight. It mostly comes up when a golfer is requesting over-length clubs or is contemplating changing to graphite shafts. So, I’m going to direct a discussion of this topic. Please chime in to let me know your thoughts and input.

The concept of swingweight was developed by custom clubmaker Kenneth Smith about 60 years ago. He was trying to figure out how to “match” clubs, and settled on balance point as a way to do so. His swingweight scale had a “hook” to hold the grip end of the club, and a fulcrum 14 inches from the butt. He created an arbitrary scale of measure that consisted of letters A-F, each letter divided into ten segments, i.e. D1, D2, D3, etc. When he measured the clubs of the day, he found most of them to be in the D2 range, so that became recognized as the “standard” for men’s woods and irons.

The golf club industry quickly adopted this method of “matching” clubs…well, because they had no other way! Because the longer the shaft, the heavier the head feels, clubheads increase in weight as the shaft gets shorter, so that the swingweight will stay the same. The theory then, and now, is that if the swingweight is the same, the clubs will feel essentially the same in the golfer’s hands.

But let’s look at what has happened since Kenneth Smith invented the swingweight scale.

  • Shafts have gotten longer by at least an inch. In the 1940s, a “standard” driver was only 42-43” long – now most are 45” if not more.
  • Shafts have gotten much lighter. Those old steel shafts weighed 150 grams or more, compared to modern graphite driver shafts in the 55-75 gram range.
  • Golfers have gotten stronger while clubs have gotten much lighter overall, but swingweights have always adhered to that D2 “standard.”

You must understand two very important factors about swingweight.

First, a “point” of swingweight–such as D2 to D3–is NOT a unit of measure like an ounce or gram. It takes much less weight to shift a driver one point, for example, than it does a wedge, because the shaft length is such an influence on this measure. Generally, the weight of a single dollar bill is a swingweight point on a driver—not much, huh?

And secondly, the overall weight of the club is at least as important as swingweight. Jack Nicklaus was noted for playing a driver in his prime that was 13.25 oz in overall weight–very heavy even for that time (most are about 10.5 oz now!), while his swingweight was only C9, considered very light. S

Swingweight by itself is a rather worthless piece of information!

So, that should get this discussion going. I’ll give you a few days to toss out your questions and comments on this subject, and then I’ll begin to address my own theories on swingweight for YOUR clubs.

Sound off, readers!

Your Reaction?
  • 37
  • LEGIT7
  • WOW2
  • LOL0
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP3
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Continue Reading

Podcasts

TG2: Review of the new ShotScope V3 GPS & shot tracking watch, Vessel VLX Stand Bag!

Published

on

I get the new ShotScope V3 GPS and shot tracking watch on my wrist for a few rounds and love the data. ShotScope V3 offers accurate GPS distances while seamlessly tracking your club data.

Vessel Bag’s new VLX stand bag is a high end, lightweight, luxury bag for golfers who love to walk. Walking with the VLX was actually more comfortable than my pushcart!

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

Your Reaction?
  • 1
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

Golf's Perfect Imperfections

Golf’s Perfect Imperfections: How to never miss another putt

Published

on

Learn how your own anatomy is designed to roll the golf ball in the direction you want to start the putt without any interference or assistance on your behalf.

All you need is a system of predictions that will help you confirm that your putting stroke is pointed in the right direction. This is how you become a witness to gravity sinking the putt for you. This will become clear after you listen to the podcast and give this a try at a golf course near you!

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

Your Reaction?
  • 2
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK5

Continue Reading

WITB

Facebook

Trending