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New 2020 PXG 0311 Gen 3 P, T, and XP irons

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2020 PXG 0311 Gen 3 irons: Real improvement

It’s been almost six years since Bob Parsons launched his passion project PXG, and it’s been as polarizing a golf equipment conversation as any out there. The only other company that generates that much conversation is when a TaylorMade driver hits the market, and from where I sit, it’s always a good time to see the reactions. I’ll be honest, PXG is progressing slowly but surely in the driver category, but one thing they have always done really well is irons.

Flashback to September of 2019 when I received an email from PXG inviting me down to see something new. I had no idea what to expect as their release cycles are a bit stretched out and the Gen 2 Irons had only been on the market for just over a year. Gen 2 Metal woods were out for an even shorter period of time, and besides putters and wedges, what else was there? Chief Product Officer Brad Schweigert had even mentioned earlier in the summer that he had no clue when a new iron would hit the market. And he’s the guy who makes ’em.

Needless to say, I was pleasantly surprised when I walked onto the back range at Scottsdale National and lead fitter Dave Cunningham unveiled what I now think is the best overall PXG iron line thus far: the PXG Gen 3 XP, P, and T irons.

New 2020 PXG Gen 3 Irons

2020 PXG 0311 Gen 3 P, T, and XP irons: The story

PXG has always utilized a high-end forging process in all of its lines, and with Gen 3 it’s cranked up a notch. Utilizing a 5x forging process (8620 Soft Carbon Steel), the team at PXG was able to create a face that is even thinner than the Gen 2. This process, in combination with their proprietary material to fill out the hollow body design (the foundation of PXG iron tech), creates an iron that is forgiving, feels amazing, and performs consistently.

These comments are a recurring theme with all high-end iron products, so overall it’s a familiar story. How does PXG add some honey to the pot to make ’em better and competitive? In this case, I can attest that the changes made to the Gen 3 legitimately made the PXG irons longer than previous models, and that’s across the board. So, to get this outta the way, yes, these irons are a step up as far as performance.

So what’s new and how did they do it?

It’s basically two main things:

  1. Impact Reactor Technolgy: PXG irons have always had an extremely thin hitting area. In the case of Gen 3, this has been ramped up with the addition of more mass behind the hitting area which equates to even higher launch across the line and significant distance gains. I saw this first hand in my testing, putting Gen 2 T against the Gen 3 T at the same specs. On average I gained 3 mph more ball speed, the launch went up a little and descent angle improved. After all that math, it equated to an increase in carry distance of six yards. That’s significant in the player’s irons category, and in my case, a welcome addition.
  2. New proprietary inner core material: It’s the PXG material inside the irons that has always been the secret sauce. This is where Bob and his team have excelled consistently. The simple way to explain what they did with Gen 3 is they added an even more elastic material to the core and added support for that material with the Impact Reactor. Obvious result: More distance, forgiveness, higher launch…you know how this goes.

The Looks

PXG 0311 Gen 3 P
The Gen 2 P was one of the best and most playable irons I had hit in years. It looked good, felt good, and it was an iron that had extreme forgiveness, all while giving better players all the playability they would want. In my opinion, the Gen 3 P took a step away from the player’s iron category and into a player’s distance iron, which is fine when you hear the report on the new T.

The new PXG Gen 3 P iron has a more robust look at address and a longer blade length. I noticed they launch even higher with even more forgiveness than the predecessor. What I really like about this change is the ability to create a serious combo for those players looking for easy to hit launch monsters in the long irons and something more precise in the short irons.

PXG 0311 Gen 3 T

The new 2020 PXG Gen 3 T iron was the highlight of this launch for me. It took the best things about the Gen 2 P and put it into a T package. Although these are a tour iron, players who were a bit nervous about the ease of use in this line will be presently surprised with Gen 3 T. These irons have the soft feel and workability of a forged blade all while providing plenty of forgiveness on off-center shots.

Case in point, I tend to hit a lot of shots center thin. With Gen 2 T, I would lose on average seven to eight yards of carry distance, with Gen 3 my center strike distance increased seven yards (on avg) and my thin shots flew the same distance as my center strikes with Gen 2…make sense? For a player like myself, that type of gain in a forged tour club is a unicorn scenario.

PXG 0311 Gen 3 XP

The two letters on the club say it XP: Xtreme Performance. These things are basically the T and “P” on steroids. The new 2020 PXG Gen 3 XP is a high-launch, high-MOI, distance machine in a very PXG package. This is the PXG iron for the slower speed player who wants to have 6 or 7 extra drivers in the bag. I will say that typically irons in this category tend to lose themselves from a looks category, but the OEMs seem to be slowly figuring this equation out. Gone are the days when the combination of distance and forgiveness had to live in a design that resembled a shovel.

The Feel/Sound

Solid. PXG irons have always felt and sounded amazing. The new 2020 PXG Gen 3 irons do feel and sound a little different. It’s a heavier hit now, especially in the T and P. In my experience with PXG, the hit with previous lines felt great but always lacked that sledgehammer feel that I look for. With the new inner core and Impact Reactor technology, PXG now has an iron that feels soft off the face and has that nice crunch at impact.

Overall

Very impressed with this launch. The new 2020 PXG Gen 3 irons offer everything Bob claims they do: quality, performance and most importantly they are fun to play.  As I mentioned, the standout for me in this line is the T. That iron will catch a lot of attention in the player’s iron category due to how easy it is to hit—all while being a legit “tour” iron.

So how do the new 2020 PXG Gen 3 irons stack up against the market? Honestly, it’s hard to say. All the OEMs are bringing the heat this year in the iron category. I will say PXG has the iron thing dialed—like TaylorMade with drivers and Titleist with balls. Some companies just do certain things better than most. My normal advice, get fit, hit ’em all, and decide for yourself. The Gen 3 will be in every conversation, I can say that, and it’s hard to deny what PXG has done. The new 2020 PXG Gen 3 are the best overall lineup the company has offered, and that’s saying a lot.

Well done, PXG crew.

PXG 0311 Gen 3 P, T, and XP irons: Pricing/availability

Pricing: $425 per club

Available: January 9

Specs per PXG below

 

 

 

 

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Johnny Wunder is the Director of Original Content, Instagram Manager and Host of “The Gear Dive” Podcast for GolfWRX.com. He was born in Seattle, Wash., and grew up playing at Rainier G&CC. John is also a partner with The Traveling Picture Show Company having most recently produced JOSIE with Game of Thrones star Sophie Turner. In 1997 Johnny had the rare opportunity of being a clubhouse attendant for the Anaheim Angels. He now resides in Toronto, On with his wife and two sons. @johnny_wunder on IG

24 Comments

24 Comments

  1. doesnotno

    Jan 14, 2020 at 9:02 am

    “With Gen 2 T, I would lose on average seven to eight yards of carry distance, with Gen 3 my center strike distance increased seven yards (on avg) and my thin shots flew the same distance as my center strikes with Gen 2”

    So a Gen 2 thin strike cost you 7 or 8 yards, and.a Gen 3 thin strike cost you 7 yards.

    I’m not seeing that as worth shouting about.

  2. Clutch Putman

    Jan 10, 2020 at 5:14 pm

    G3 PXG = Perfection. No long iron picks the ball up as well from a tight lie.

  3. WS

    Jan 10, 2020 at 5:08 pm

    Sorry but not worth $425/, plus they don’t look good – look cheap to me – yes they feel nice and the seem go far – strong lofts, I know i’ve been down this road before I sure wouldn’t go down it again

    • Clutch Putman

      Jan 10, 2020 at 6:40 pm

      G3 PXG is a dollar well spent

    • 19_Majors

      Jan 28, 2020 at 10:05 am

      Actually the Gen 3 0311T are not really strong lofted compared to most iron sets. Maybe a degree or 2 from traditional. Also, go see the 0311 in person. Photos don’t do them justice. I don’t own a set but hit them at a fitter last week. In person they look ultra premium.

  4. Pelling

    Jan 10, 2020 at 4:45 pm

    So $425 per iron for a Taylormade RACMB TP knockoff!

  5. Cay

    Jan 9, 2020 at 10:19 pm

    they released the t zoid true MP. MP means moron preferred.

  6. Shawn

    Jan 9, 2020 at 6:37 pm

    So ugly.

  7. Speedy

    Jan 9, 2020 at 6:36 pm

    Anyone buying this brand?

  8. Karsten's Ghost

    Jan 9, 2020 at 6:19 pm

    They’ve even “borrowed” Ping’s 5/8″ lengths. Do these guys have no shame? They should just call themselves Samsung Golf.

  9. Fredo

    Jan 9, 2020 at 5:22 pm

    Ugly? That’s debatable, but who cares if they rock your world! It will be hard to give up my Gen 1 irons, but I might give these a spin.

  10. Connor

    Jan 9, 2020 at 4:05 pm

    The T’s look pretty good I can’t lie. Probably will test these to see if anything has changed but price tag is still just not in my price range

  11. Rich Douglas

    Jan 9, 2020 at 12:17 pm

    Would you play them if money was no object? Are they objectively better than other irons, with their cost being the only barrier to universal acceptance?

    I doubt it.

    The cost will knock out most players from even considering them, but there are other considerations, too (for those who can pay). Other irons might be better for you.

    Now, if they come out with a single-length set….

  12. Cody Reeder

    Jan 9, 2020 at 10:46 am

    I would love to try their blades, but they are just too far out of my price range.

  13. Kenny

    Jan 9, 2020 at 10:39 am

    Go practice and dig it out of the dirt….

  14. Chris

    Jan 9, 2020 at 9:54 am

    Those look awesome! My game has improved dramatically with the Gen2s. I look forward to trying these.

  15. Dyson Bochambeau

    Jan 9, 2020 at 9:53 am

    Ugly

  16. Will

    Jan 9, 2020 at 9:33 am

    Would buy them if I could, but for now will stick with my i200’s. Don’t understand the hate that PXG gets sometimes. I actually like the looks of them.

  17. dat

    Jan 9, 2020 at 9:21 am

    How can you make a product better when it was already the best in golf, PERIOD? lol. $3500+ a set?Oh well, a sucker born every minute – although very few suckers can afford these.

    • Tyler Durden

      Jan 9, 2020 at 6:41 pm

      Look at this pathetic person, whining about how someone else spends their own money

      • dat

        Jan 9, 2020 at 9:10 pm

        Nice comment, ad hominem as well.

        • Travisty

          Jan 11, 2020 at 1:19 pm

          @dat You can say the same thing about your original comment.

  18. Anthony

    Jan 9, 2020 at 9:05 am

    Those irons are so pretty.
    I hit them and you are correct John, +3mph ball speed, +6yards

  19. Rob

    Jan 9, 2020 at 7:36 am

    Yikes! Those are hideous.

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What GolfWRXers are saying about iron covers

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@thegolfinggreen

In our forums, our members have been discussing iron covers with WRXer ‘anythingfinite’ championing the use of iron covers when walking. As a walker, ‘anythingfinite’ says

“I hated the sound of clubs clanking together with every step. So I used neoprene iron covers and endured the ridicule for years. They never, ever slowed my play as I average 18 holes in a little over 2.5hrs playing by myself. It was never about protecting resale value, just about the noise.”

And our members have been discussing iron covers and whether they currently use them or would be tempted to use them in the future.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • jvincent: “Clanking irons in the bag is like the sound of metal spikes on a path. It’s old school golf.”
  • Z1ggy16: “Toss your club cleaning towel in the clubs to help stop them from clanking *as much*. You can also use your one hand to kind of hold some of them in place as you walk.”
  • Windlaker_1: “I use the neoprene covers. Not for resale value, as I normally keep them so long they aren’t worth diddley-poo at that point. Use them to maintain a nice-looking set of irons.”
  • MtlJeff: “I don’t really notice it that much when I walk, to be honest. Maybe its how I arrange my clubs….If the clanging is bothering me, you can just move the clubs slightly, and it usually mitigates it. But if you’re like, breakdancing down the fairway, tough to stop it.”
  • puttingmatt: “It’s your choice. I use iron covers, lets me not forget a club around the green, as the cover in pocket is a quick reminder that something is a miss. Also, it’s a good way to protect your clubs, and at these prices, makes you wonder why not since woods and putters are sold with covers that are intended to be used. One other note, it may keep others from assessing what’s in the bag, and keep a thief wondering if the bag is worth the effort. Hate the feeling about club theft, but clubs are targets.”

Entire Thread: “Confessions of an iron cover user”

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Is 8 degrees between pitching wedge and sand wedge too much? – GolfWRXers have their say

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In our forums, our members have been discussing gapping degrees and whether 8-degrees between your PW and SW is too much. WRXer ‘jonsnow’ seldom hits his GW and is considering dropping the club from the bag and wants to know, if he does so, will the current 8-degree gap between his wedges be too much. Our members have their say.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • ZA206: “For years I played a 47 PW and a 56 SW. I had a big hole in my scoring irons range (115-105 yards) that I tried to avoid at all costs. It cost me many strokes over the years. I felt like that gap was way too big and eventually settled on 46, 51, 55 (I also play a 60 LW) as my preferred setup. No gaps and I can hit every yardage without any issue. I’m a much better wedge player now than I ever was back then, but that’s not due to having more wedges, that’s more about technique.”
  • RainShadow: “In theory, yes. In actual real world action, depends on how many types of shots you can hit with the PW.”
  • MtlJeff: “I’ve played with 52 to 60 gaps. It depends on what type of shots you want to hit. I never chip with sand wedge and would rather hit a 3/4 shot with a 52 than a full with a 56. So it all depends on your game.”
  • bazinky: “A lot depends on how often you have shots in that yardage range. For example, I replaced my 50 and 54 with a single 52 wedge because I hardly ever had a yardage that required my 50 (I would sometimes go weeks without ever hitting it). That said, my biggest gap is 6 degrees. I think it’s doable as long as you have the discipline to be smart when you have a bad yardage. It can be tough to just aim for the fat of the green when you have a wedge in your hand.”
  • Pingistheanser: “I don’t think so. I’m more of a believer that you should pick lofts based upon the distances that you need to hit from. If those lofts allow you to hit distances that you need to hit, then they’re fine for you. I’m not a believer that you should have 4-degree gaps between your wedges because what good is a club that you never hit because you never find yourself in that distance range? For a time last year, I carried a 46-degree AW and a 56 degree as my only wedges, and they worked just fine. I’d sometimes have to make some adjustments if I found myself 90 yards off of the green because it would be too far for the 56, so I would just narrow my stance, grip down a bit and only swing the AW at about 75%.”

Entire Thread: “Is 8 degrees between PW and SW too much?”

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Are modern irons with stronger lofts easier/harder to hit than older irons? – GolfWRXers have their say

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In our forums, our members have been discussing modern irons with stronger lofts and whether they are easier or harder to play than older irons. WRXer ‘harpu728’ kicks off the thread saying:

“Being that higher-lofted irons within the same set are easier to hit (i.e. an 8 iron is easier to hit than a 6 iron), I’m trying to draw comparisons to modern irons with stronger lofts, and if these lofts make them harder to hit in theory.

My 10-year-old’s 7 iron is 33 degrees and carries about 150. When comparing this to some of the newer sets out there where 7-irons are slightly longer (club length) and have lofts of 30 degrees, would this mean that ‘on paper’ the modern 7-iron is ‘harder’ to hit than my 10-year old’s 7 iron? Or should I be comparing my 7-iron to the modern 8-iron, which would likely carry as far as my current 7-iron?”

And our members have been weighing in with their thoughts in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • CAT GOLFER: “Good question, the way I understand it, disregard the number on the bottom of the club. A stronger(lower) loft in newer irons will produce a higher ball flight than the weaker(higher) loft in older clubs. At least that is the marketing pitch. The intent is to make it easier to launch the ball higher and in the process easier to hit. Also, keep in mind modern clubs also have more forgiveness built into them. Stronger lofted, higher launching, easier to hit if you buy the whole pitch.”
  • Sean2: “I don’t pay attention to the number on the club, so much as the loft. With the stronger lofts, I have no long irons in my bag as I simply can’t hit them…maybe being 65 has something to do with it as well, lol. At one time I carried 4-iron on down, now it’s 7-iron on down. But no way I can hit a 18º-19º 4-iron, let alone a 21º 5. I have the same number of irons…they just have a different number/letter on them than they did before.”
  • Warrick: “Important to pair the right shaft with these new iron setups, more so than ever.”
  • puttingmatt: “Look at it like this, instead of missing the green with a standard lofted 7 iron, now you can miss the green with the strong lofted 8 iron. I do not think the modern lofted irons translate into better scores or better misses for golfers. The loft alone is not going to turn a 5hc into a scratch player.”
  • lil’mike: “I guess you could say it something like this. Nowadays when you use a 5 iron, you get the height of a 6 iron but the distance of a 4 iron! Lol. I do think that it can make it hard to hold greens with the irons producing lower spin or at least too low of spin like some reviewers have mentioned in some cases. The bad thing about the stronger lofts is that they are getting to the point of needing two-gap wedges now before you reach the loft spacing that a sand wedge loft of 56 degrees has. For example, the new Mavrik irons have two gap wedges. So it is a 4 iron at 18 degrees, a PW is 41, so AW is 46 and GW is 51. I think that is getting ridiculous as they are turning the stock set makeup from 3-PW to 6-double gap wedge! lol”

Entire Thread: “Are modern irons with stronger lofts easier/harder to hit than older irons?”

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