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GolfWRX Spotted: Titleist Vokey SM8

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In what is not unusual in today’s media age, Titleist gave the golf world a heads up that tour seeding of the all-new 2020 Vokey SM8 wedges would begin this week at the RSM Classic on the PGA Tour.

Although Vokey isn’t giving us the full rundown of the technology that is being implemented into the new SM8 wedges, there are a few things from the pictures so far that have us speculating on what those changes could be.

Titleist Vokey SM8 wedges: What we know

Refined Vokey Grinds: Titleist Vokey wedges are driven by tour feedback from the best players in the world. There’s no question there have been some tweaks to the grinds that many players know and love. These subtle teaks are all about keeping up to the demands of the modern game and turf conditions. Technology in turf management is just as advanced as modern golf club manufacturing and as we continue to see it change, the short game tools like Vokey wedges will continue to evolve with it.

New Milling Techniques for Grooves: We are keen to hear the details on how the Vokey wedge R&D team approached this new SM8 face and groove design, especially considering how good the SM7s already performed.

Titleist Vokey wedges have utilized variable groove shaping based on loft to maximize short game performance in the past and we’re ready to hear how the Vokey team looks to improve on that.
If we draw potential comparisons to recently released wedges like the new Callaway MD5 JAWS, tool changes and draft angles can now bring each and every face right to the limit of conformity and increase control, as long as companies work with machine shops to constantly check parts. Titleist’s quality control is already one of the best in the business, so to see how they have improved it once more will be interesting.

Mass Shifting & Feel Improvements: Feel comes from sound, and sound comes from vibration. In previous Vokey designs, engineers have moved mass vertically in the head to change the center of gravity and improve ball flight and spin control. With the SM7s, that mass shifting was well pronounced with a large “scoop” or channel in the back of the higher-lofted wedges. With the new Titleist Vokey SM8, it appears that the SM7 style channel is gone and replaced with a traditional flat back—but looking closer it’s easy to see how the top half of the higher lofts are still thicker than lower loft options, and this could be about feel.

As mentioned, feel is sound, and as any piece of metal gets thinner it can start to vibrate at a higher pitch, and in golf clubs that higher pitch and be considered an unpleasant “feel.” It looks like designers may have solved this with the SM8s by continuing to shift mass but also replace some of the lost thickness from the previous SM7 to improve sound and feel without sacrificing control.

Join the discussion to see what golfers are saying about the all-new Titleist Vokey SM8s wedges in the GolfWRX Forums

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Ryan Barath is a writer & the Digital Content Creation Lead for GolfWRX. He also hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on GolfWRX Radio discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club fitter & master club builder who has more than 16 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

13 Comments

13 Comments

  1. Trevino

    Dec 3, 2019 at 4:53 pm

    The satin finish looks amazing just like my 620MB. Definitely will buy these.

  2. Ryan

    Nov 19, 2019 at 9:25 am

    I think the look is for stamping. There is all that empty free space on the back to stamp sayings, logos, etc. That seems to be an ever growing trend and it doesn’t surprise me that Vokey designs a wedge to maximize that.

  3. Moses

    Nov 19, 2019 at 6:47 am

    I love Ping Glide Wedges.

  4. Srksi

    Nov 19, 2019 at 6:23 am

    The progressive center of gravity technology from the 6 and 7 series is gone? Is there an explanation? Odd.

  5. M

    Nov 19, 2019 at 4:25 am

    Epic fail in the looks department.. No tech for wet spin… time to buy Ping

  6. CrashTestDummy

    Nov 18, 2019 at 9:52 pm

    I have had pretty much every version of the SM series. The SM7 they made it more of mid-size wedge. Not fond of it. With the bigger head, it has very different feel and doesn’t swing as freely as the older smaller headed versions. Hopefully, they made these ones with smaller head and get back to more of a player’s wedge size.

  7. Big Donkey

    Nov 18, 2019 at 9:46 pm

    M Kuchar sucks.

  8. JThunder

    Nov 18, 2019 at 7:03 pm

    “Feel comes from sound” … “Feel is sound”.

    Both statements are FALSE. This is a complete lack of understanding in the golf world, likely related to poor education and the inability to understand words properly.

    Feel and sound ARE related – it is difficult to separate them.

    SOUND is the vibration of an object that causes compression and rarefaction in the air – sound waves / acoustic energy – which is picked up by our ears and sent to our brains through our sense of hearing.

    FEEL is the vibration of an object that is picked up by the nerves in our hands (in the case of a golf club), transmitted to our brains through our sense of touch.

    Deaf people can feel vibrations. We can hear pitch without touching an object.

    The two things are separate – let’s not dumb down the world any more by saying they are the same thing.

  9. jgpl001

    Nov 18, 2019 at 6:47 pm

    Don’t agree with any of the comments
    They look fresh and modern with a smaller more rounded profile like the ping glide forged.
    I’ll be the first in the queue when released
    I do hope there is a raw or black option

  10. Tom Long

    Nov 18, 2019 at 6:15 pm

    I hope they change style. They look like Taylor Made p-790 irons, the ugliest irons out there. Say it ain’t so Bob.

  11. Jerryal Ingram

    Nov 18, 2019 at 4:59 pm

    Thy look too much like Taylormade wedges

  12. DJ

    Nov 18, 2019 at 4:48 pm

    vokey needs to bring back the black nickel.

  13. JACKWOODS@GMAIL.COM

    Nov 18, 2019 at 4:36 pm

    UGLY

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Whats in the Bag

Presidents Cup WITBs: International Team

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  • see the U.S. squad’s WITBs here 

Hideki Matsuyama

Driver: TaylorMade M5 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 8 X

3-wood: TaylorMade M4 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 9 TX

Hybrid: Ping G410 (18 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD-DI 115 X

Irons: Srixon Z 965 (4-PW)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Wedges: Cleveland RTX4 Forged (52, 56, 60)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron Prototype

Golf Ball: Srixon Z-Star XV

Grips: Iomic X-Evolution

Joaquin Niemann

Driver: Ping G400 LST (10 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Chemical Tensei White 70 TX

3-wood: Ping G410
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8X

Hybrid: Ping G400
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI Hybrid 95 X

Irons: Ping iBlade (4-9)
Shaft: Project X 6.0

Wedges: Ping Glide 2.0 (46 degrees), Ping Glide Forged (52, 56, 60)
Shafts: Project X 6.5

Putter: Ping Vault 2.0 Anser
Putter Grip: P58 Midsized

Golf Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Ribbed

Louis Oostuizen

Driver: Ping G400 LST (10 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS T1100 65

5-wood: Ping G400 (17 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Tour Spec 7.2 X

Driving iron: Ping Blueprint (3-iron)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Red Hybrid

Irons: Ping Blueprint (4-PW)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (52, 56, 60)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Putter: Ping Vault 2.0 Voss
Putter grip: PP58 Midsized Cord

Golf Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Grips: Custom Switch Grip

Adam Scott

Driver: Titleist TS4
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 8 X

3-wood: Titleist TS2 (16.5 degrees, A1 setting)
Shaft: Fujikura Rombax P95

Irons: Titleist 680 (4-9)
Shafts: KBS Tour 130X

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM8 (48, 52, 56, 60 degrees)
Shafts: Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Putter: Scotty Cameron Prototype SC-X

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Abraham Ancer

Driver: Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero

3-wood: TaylorMade M4
Shaft: LA Golf Shafts 70x White Tie

5-wood: TaylorMade M2
Shaft: Matrix VLCT X

Hybrid: TaylorMade UDI (23 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi OT110 X

Irons: Miura MB-5005
Shaft: Mitsubishi OT110 X

Wedges: Artisan MT Grind (51.5, 56, 60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

Cameron Smith

Driver: Titleist TS2 (9.5 degrees)
Shaft: Graphite Design Dj6X

3-wood: Titleist TS2 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF 70 TX

5-wood: Titleist TS2 (18 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei BF 70 TX

Irons: Titleist T100 (4-9)
Shaft: KBS Tour X

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM7 Raw (46-10, 52-10, 56-08, 60 degrees)
Shaft: KBS Tour 130X

Putter: Scotty Cameron

Ball: Titleist Pro V1X

Haotong Li

Driver: TaylorMade M6 (9 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Rogue Silver 130 70TX

3-wood: TaylorMade M6 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila Rogue Silver 130 80TX

5-wood: TaylorMade M5 (19 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 80X

Irons: TaylorMade M3 (3), TaylorMade P750 (4-9)
Shafts: Nippon Pro Modus3 120X

Wedges: TaylorMade MG (48) High Toe (52) Vokey SM7 (60T)
Shafts: Nippon Pro Modus3 120X

Putter: Bettinardi Custom

Ball: Titleist Pro V1

C.T. Pan

Driver: Titleist TS2 (9.5 degrees, A1 setting)
Shaft: Fujikura Atmos Blue 6X

3-wood: Titleist TS3 (16.5 degrees, A1 setting)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Red 70 TX

Irons: Titleist U510 (3), Titleist U500 (4), Titleist T100 (5-9)
Shaft: Project X HZDRS Red 85 (3), Project X 6.0 (4-9)

Wedges: Vokey Design “Raw Heated” SM7 (46-10F, 52-08F, 58-10K, 62-08M)
Shafts: Dynamic Gold Tour Issue Purple S400

Putter: Scotty Cameron 009M
Ball: Titleist Pro V1X

Sung Jae Im

Driver: Titleist TS3 (9.5 degrees, D1 setting, draw CG)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 7X

3-wood: Titleist TS3 (15 degrees) D1
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 8TX

Hybrid: Titleist 818 H2 (19 degrees, A1 setting)
Shaft: Graphite Design Tour AD DI 105 X

Irons: Titleist T100 (4-PW)
Shafts: Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design SM8 Raw (52-08F, 56-08 M, 60-04L)
Shafts: Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X-100

Putter: Scotty Cameron Phantom T6 STR
Ball:  Titleist Pro V1X

Byeong Hun An

Driver: Titleist TS3 (8.5 Degrees) B2 Setting, Draw CG
Shafts: Accra TZ5 65 M5

3-wood: Titleist TS2 (13.5 Degrees) D4 Setting
Shaft: Project X HZDRS Smoke Black 80X

Irons: Titleist 716 TMB (3, 4, 5), Titleist 620 MB (6-9)
Shaft: Nippon Pro Modus Hybrid TX (3), Project X 6.5 (4-9)

Wedges: Titleist Vokey Design Raw SM8 (48-10, 52-08, 56-08, 60T)
Shafts: Project X 6.5 (46, 48, 52), Project X 6.0 (56), True Temper Dynamic Gold S400 (60)

Putter: Scotty Cameron Proto

Ball: Pro V1X

Marc Leishman

Driver: Callaway Epic Flash Sub Zero (9 Degrees)

Shaft: Fujikura Speeder 757 Evolution II X

3 wood: Callaway Epic Flash (15 Degrees)

Shaft: Fujikura Motore Speeder VC Tour Spec 9.2X

5 wood: Callaway Epic Flash (18 Degrees)

Shaft: Fujikura Motore Speeder VC Tour Spec 9.2X

Utility: Callaway Apex UT (21 Degrees)

Shaft: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X

Irons: (3-9): Callaway Apex MB
Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X

Wedges: Callaway Jaws MD5 (48, 52,56)

Shafts: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X

Lob wedge: Titleist Vokey SM7(60-08M),

Shaft: Nippon N.S. Pro Modus3 Tour 130X

Putter: Odyssey Versa 6 Black

Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft X

Adam Hadwin

Driver: Callaway Epic Flash (10.5 Degrees) 

Shaft: Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana D+ 70x

3 wood: Callaway Rogue (14.5 Degrees) 

Shaft: Mitsubishi Rayon Diamana D+ 72x

Utility: Callaway X Forged (3-4) 

Shafts: True Temper Project X 7.0

Irons: (5-PW): Callaway Apex MB, 

Shafts: True Temper Project X 7.0

Wedges: Callaway Jaws Mack Daddy MD5 

Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Putter: Odyssey Stroke Lab Double Wide

Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Is one brand OCD a thing?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from IamMarkMac who asks WRXers whether they feel one brand OCD is a thing. Our members share their thoughts on the subject and discuss the pros and cons of having a one brand bag.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Tim Sherwood: “I don’t mind having a bag where there’s a mix of manufactures (although my bag is now all Srixon except wedges and putter, as their gear just works for me); however, I cannot stand having a bag that is branded and having none of that OEM’s clubs in it. I recently had to buy an off-brand bag as I couldn’t bring myself to put zero Taylormade clubs in a Taylormade bag. Finding a clean, almost unbranded bag wasn’t easy though.”
  • MattyO1984: “It’s something that I have thought about, and I definitely believe that I have OCD when it comes to my bag. I am all Titleist everything. My being a Titleist guy goes back to when I was barely even a teenager. Tiger had a Scotty putter and a 975D driver. I wanted them, and from there, over time, everything became all Titleist everything and everything in the bag has to match. There are plenty of other headcovers that I could have bought for my clubs, but because they aren’t black, white and red, I simply wouldn’t go near them. I even mark my ball with one black dot above the number and red dot below the number. I know it’s weird, but I am OK with it. If anything, I feel more confident using Titleist, and at the end of the day, confidence is a huge factor in golf so I can’t see my changing any time soon…well apart from my AP2’s which will shortly be switched for T100’s.”
  • pheenomz4774: “Brand OCD is a thing for me. I sometimes don’t, but when I found a manufacturer, I liked I tend to go all-in. For me it’s not about being looking like anything to anybody else, it’s a trust in a company that’s engineered their own products to match feel, gapping, etc. throughout their own bag. Most manufacturers have several options in every spot in the bag, so while it may have been true in the past, it’s very hard not to find a type of club you want within a single OEM. If I were truly “min/maxing” to squeeze every possible yard and spin rate, I’d probably have several different brands in the bag. For how much I play, that chore seems way too exhausting to sift through, and so I found a manufacturer that got me “close enough” knowing my actual golf scores won’t differ so much.”
  • ChipNRun: “Is it OCD, or does focusing on one brand save one time and money? Since about 2012, most of my club choices have been Callaway and Tour Edge. They just seem to fit my eye better. That said, Cobra hybrids have a solid place in the bag. I also like the Cobra FWs, but I can only have so many golf bag sets. As for Callaway, the top two pros at my club are Callaway guys. Golfers at the club get to hit a lot of prototype models the pros get for us prior to general release. They work closely with the Callaway rep, who shows up for general demo days and special Callaway-only visits. You can make a club selection decision over several months rather than after one day on Trackman. Tour Edge is good also. I got to know the regional TE reps very well the past ten years, and the lesson pro I work with is a knowledgeable TE fitter.”

Entire Thread: “Is one brand OCD a thing?”

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Forum Thread of the Day: “Best driver for low face contact?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from barony19 who is on the lookout for a driver that “combines forgiveness and great spin control on contact that’s below the center of the face.” A single-digit handicapper, barony19 is currently playing a Rogue SZ, and our members discuss drivers in the market which could be good alternatives.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • getitdaily: “M5…not just because I play it, but because I’ve missed low on the course in just the 2.5 weeks I’ve had the driver and the ball still goes.”
  • Noke: “Cobra LTD and Wishon 919 come to mind. They use similar, flatter roll up/down the face that will help with low contact. LTD has a lower CG, but Wishon 919 is higher MOI.”
  • reider69: “ST190. I have been shocked at how much distance I get on low/thinned shots.”
  • DixieD: “My brother has a F8 plus that he purposefully tees low and hits cut bullets. The thing flies.”
  • GSDriver: “Epic, works well anywhere on the face. Maybe tee it lower if can’t get impact point up to where it should be?”

Entire Thread: “Best driver for low face contact?”

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