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WRX Spotlight: Shapland Sunday bag

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Product: Shapland Sunday bag

Pitch:Shapland Sports Co. is passionate about design, quality, and doing things right. We believe that quality design is built to last.  Whether it is a beautiful building, a classic car, a family heirloom, or a well-made sports bag, these things become more important to us as time goes on.  We have engineered all of our products so you can take pride in them for years to come. While our products gain inspiration from the great designs of the past, we will only make something if we believe we can improve upon it. Whether by using the best materials available or tailoring it to the modern age, our lightweight and water resistant products made from 14-oz canvas, top-grain leather accents and antique brass hardware will become a reliable addition to your life. When you buy a Shapland product, you know that you are not just getting the best made product money can buy, but the best designed product of its kind.”

Our Take on Shapland’s Sunday bag

Shapland’s Sunday bag is built for comfort and for those walkers out there on the course; it’s a detail which is impossible to overlook. One of the best features of this bag delivers that comfort through the two shoulder straps which are billed as “cushion-like” – a description which is a very accurate assessment. An added benefit of these straps is also the fact that these cushion straps are removable, which gives players options depending on the way they like to carry their bag on the course.

The bag’s lightness is a wonderful relief. Weighing in at just 3.5lbs, the Sunday bag is an excellent walker’s bag and combined with the cushion straps, really provides the low maintenance and practicality which walkers seek on the course.

The bag contains a 4-way cushioned divider which, like the entire bag, is very pleasing on the eye and the bag also boasts an impressive full-length spine rod, and the overall balance of the bag is on point. While lightweight is the priority of a bag such as this, the company have gone to extra lengths to deliver quality, and the premium leather trim enhances the style of the bag, while the actual feel of the bag is luxurious and of excellent quality.

The UV resistant and water-resistant canvas fabric provides you with ultimate protection against the elements which you might not expect to find in a lightweight bag such as this, while the waterproof zippers are another delightful addition of a bag which mixes nostalgia with modernity. The classic colors provided also add to the style, with navy, black, gray, burgundy, and green color codes available.

Generous storage areas on such a lightweight bag is another excellent element provided by Shapland, while the waterproof head comes in the same color as the bag keeping in line with the classic look. Shapland also offers custom embroidery on the bottom of the bag—if personalization is your thing.

Nailing everything you’d want in a lightweight bag while also being easy on the eye, the Shapland Sunday bag retails at $275 and is available to purchase at ShaplandBags.com.

 

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Gianni is a freelance writer. He holds a Bachelor of Arts as well as a Diploma in Sports Journalism. He can be contacted at gmagliocco@outlook.com. Follow him on Twitter @giannimosquito

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Nils Nelson

    Nov 18, 2019 at 5:13 pm

    When I saw the leather spine on the Shapland and how it extends above the top of the bag–for improved balance–I thought of the truly original design that I found in a thrift store back in the ’80s. It was the stick bag, a simple canvas golf bag with one pocket from the ’30s or ’40s that had a hickory spine extending about five inches past the top. I made a soft foam strap to replace the worn canvas strap and voila! Perfect balance. With 12 clubs, the bag rode gently on my shoulder and I didn’t even know it was there.
    Around that time, I saw a new stick bag, but it was poorly made. Inexpensive, though. I ended up trying to make my own, but without the requisite professional sewing machine to do the job properly, it didn’t work out.
    I may still have that old hickory model buried in my golf shed. The Shapland is handsome, but my heart belongs to “old hickory.”

  2. Pelling

    Nov 16, 2019 at 8:46 pm

    Or you could just get a Jones bag for $139-$159…Shapland looks poorly designed, cheap.

    • Mike B

      Nov 17, 2019 at 12:11 pm

      I have the original stand bag. You couldn’t be more wrong on the quality. Top notch. And when they discovered an issue with 1 of the straps they mailed out a new strap. Customer service like I haven’t seen in a long time. Kudos to Shapland.

  3. Peter Seltenright

    Nov 15, 2019 at 2:00 pm

    You won’t be disappointed with a Shapland bag. I have the original design and it’s incredible, I’m always getting compliments at the course.

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Whats in the Bag

Andrew Landry’s winning WITB: The American Express 2020

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Driver: Ping G410 LST (10.5 degrees, neutral setting)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Blue 65 TX (tipped 1″, 45.25″)

3-wood: TaylorMade M5 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow

5-wood: Ping G (set at 17.75)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow 85-6.5 (42″)

7-wood: Ping G410 (set at 20.5 degrees)
Shaft: Project X HZRDUS Yellow 83-6.5 (41″, tipped 2″)

Irons: Ping iBlade (4-PW)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 105-X

Wedges: Ping Glide 3.0 (46 bent to 45), Titleist Vokey Design SM8 (54, 60 degrees)
Shafts: Nippon Modus3 Tour 105-X

Putter: Ping Vault 2.0 ZB Stealth (33″, 22° lie, 3° loft)
Grip: PP58 Full Cord Standard

Grips: Lamkin Crossline Full Cord 58R

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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Whats in the Bag

Lee Westwood’s winning WITB: 2020 Abu Dhabi HSBC Golf Championship

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Driver: Ping G410 Plus (10.5 degrees at 10 degrees, neutral)
Shaft: Aldila NV 2KXV Green 65 X (tipped 1/2 inch)

3-wood: Ping G410 (14.5 degrees)
Shaft: Aldila NV 2KXV Green

Hybrid: Ping G410 (19 degrees at 19.7)
Shaft: Aldila Tour Green Hybrid 85 X (40.5 inches)

Driving iron: Ping G Crossover (2)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff

Irons: Ping i210 (4-UW)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff w/Cushin stepped 1 strong

Wedges: Ping Glide Forged (60 degrees)
Shaft: Ping JZ Stiff w/Cushin, stepped 1 strong

Putter: Ping Sigma 2 Fetch

Grips: Lamkin Crossline Full Cord 58 Rib (+2 wraps) on woods, Ping ID8 White 1/2 Cord (+2 wraps) on irons

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

 

Additional specs on Ping.com

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Equipment

From a Fitter: Everything you need to know about wedge shafts

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This is such a dark corner of the golf industry that I truly believe needs a lot of work. Hopefully, this article can shed some light on wedge shafts for you.

I will mention some standards, explain some of my experience, and hopefully, help you make some good choices.

Linking back to the first article on aspects of a wedge that I target when fitting, I place a lot of weight on the style, bounce, grind, and loft/lie/length to get my wedge fitting started. As we move into shaft options, I look at crossing T’s and dotting I’s to ensure a player enjoys their new wedge setup.

We carry a bunch of shaft options built into different heads. As yet we do not have a consistent way to swap shafts in wedges during a session that still allows them to play at a reasonable swing weight and perform as we would like. Moving forward, I will be looking to explore this area to see if we can deliver better service and experience.

Generic standards for wedge shaft setup

  • Dynamic Gold “wedge flex”
  • Matching exactly the same shaft in your irons to your wedges
  • A slightly heavier shaft in your wedges
  • Putting an 8-iron shaft in your wedges
  • Using a wedge-specific shaft

During an iron fitting, we see a lot of variables in flight and feel, this is mainly because we use 6-irons as our demo clubs. When clients are hitting 6-iron shots, they are often looking for max carry, flight, and shot-shaping ability. This leads to hitting a lot of full swings and placing the shaft under a decent amount of load, therefore, we see some notable changes when we swap shafts. This will not show up as drastically in wedges as we are not always trying to hit the full shot. 

As we get into wedge fitting, I discuss with my clients in-depth what they use each wedge for, how far they hit them, what is the most common shot they play, what are the most common bad shots, how does the ball react on the green and what shots do they feel they need in the bag. Basically, trying to get a good overview of their game in a short period. In very few cases do players mention the ‘full shot’ lets them down? Often players say they are more comfortable hitting “softer shots” or 3/4 swings, this gives them the flight/shot that they require on a regular basis and the niche shots and consistency lets them down.

Logic here says to me, you probably do not want exactly the same shaft in the irons all the way down to the lob wedge when you are hitting soft shots 95 percent of the time. When I look at shaft specs, I am trying to build a shaft that can easily put up with the stress of a full shot and handle a softer shot without feeling blunt (for all clubs in the bag).

When I merge this process into wedges, the only wedge a “matching iron” shaft seems to be applicable (for the majority) is the gap wedge or the wedge that is predominantly a full-swing club. This is the club you hit full and maybe knock-down shots with, but you’re rarely trying to hit “flicky” spinning shots. (Those shots are why you also have a sand and/or lob wedge in the bag).

It would then make sense that if you are rarely hitting any full shots with your sand wedge or lob wedge, you probably want a softer golf shaft in those (as they are not trying to put up with your “flat out” swing), still ensuring the shaft does not feel ‘blunt’ or hard work to play around the greens with.

This is not a one size fits all theory, but I think a lot of players would have success even thinking about their wedge shaft layout in this way.

As an example: Personally, I am playing True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue 120g X100 flex iron shafts. I hit a lot of full shots with my 50 and 54, so I have chosen to play the DG 120TI X100 shaft exactly the same way in those two clubs. My 60-degree however, I rarely hit the full shot, so I feel need it a little softer in stiffness, but I need the weight to get my tempo correct and to give me more control to hit lower shots. For this club, I play the Dynamic Gold S400 Tour Issue. I chose this shaft as the profile is very close to my iron shaft but it is 13g heavier and has a slightly softer tip section, which I feel gives me a little better response.

Please see the S3 shaft profile comparison below

(I am very lucky to have the S3 shaft data, it gives me an apples-to-apples comparison of shaft profiles and weights and make wedge shaft selection a lot easier).

I also wanted to capture some data to highlight the difference wedge shafts have as simply as possible. Below is a graph showing a PGA pro’s shot grouping with a few shaft options. His 6-iron speed is about 94mph, and he has a sharp back-swing to down-swing ratio. This would put him at the quick end of people I fit. This generally means the player enjoys stiffer shafts, stiff style profiles, high swingweight, high total/shaft weight (and again not in all cases).

He tested three shafts all in the same wedge head, with the same length, loft, and lie.

Please see the grouping below

The three shafts tested were: Nippon Modus 105 Wedge specific, Dynamic Gold Wedge flex and Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400.

In no way am I trying to demonstrate the DG S400 is the best shaft for wedges, but in this group of data all that shows up is, the stiffest profile, heaviest shaft (of the test group) gave the player the tightest grouping for his 55-degree wedge shot. His explanation was that he felt the club’s position in the swing better and the strike through the turf was much more consistent, producing more consistent land zones with the DG S400. This small test shows that the wedge shaft alone has an impact even for a skilled golfer.

There are however always exceptions to theories (especially in golf!)

When I have a player using, for example, C-Taper 130 X or Dynamic Gold X100 in their irons it is tough to find a profile that matches closely that is heavier and not any stiffer. In these cases, I tend to have them play the same shaft all the way down to their LW, but I try to increase swing weight and decrease FM in the niche shot wedges (SW and LW). This can just mean adding head weight to soften the shaft a little, or sometimes soft-stepping the product to get some ‘feel’ back. 

The key take-away points

  • Think about the shots you play with your wedges most and how hard you hit them
  • Think about linking your shafts to your irons, but they do not always have to match
  • Test options and measure: grouping, turf interaction and flight consistency
  • Try and break down if the ‘”feel” of stiffness or weight help or hinder you making a consistent swing/strike
  • Don’t just settle with the shaft the wedges come with… unless they match in with your setup!

Getting all the information in one article is always tough, and I hate generalizing, so feel free to shoot me some questions—I like to try to help and also hear your experience and ideas when I can!

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