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Morning 9: Captain Els makes his picks | What makes a great captain’s pick? | Brutal DQ

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By Ben Alberstadt
Email me at ben.alberstadt@golfwrx.com and find me at @benalberstadt on Instagram and golfwrxEIC on Twitter.

November 7, 2019

Good Thursday morning, golf fans. 
 
**Just a reminder we’re looking for advertisers for 2020. Drop me a line if you’d like to talk about getting your message in front of the M9 readership.** 

 

1. Els’ picks
Golf Channel’s Rex Hoggard on the International Team captain choosing age over experience…”Els named Joaquin Niemann and Sungjae Im – 20 and 21 years old, respectively – along with Jason Day and Adam Hadwin, 32, his four captain’s picks for this year’s International Presidents Cup team.”
  • “The four picks, which were announced Wednesday evening, round out what is the youngest International team with six rookies, but Els didn’t see that as a drawback following more than two decades of futility in the biennial matches for the International side.”

“I didn’t go looking for Joaquin who is 20, or Sungjae who is 21, but they made themselves a lock on this team,” Els said. “I definitely wasn’t that good at 20, 21, but these guys are world-class players and they’ve proven themselves. I’m excited by the new blood that’s coming in.”

Full piece.

2. The essential qualities of good captain’s picks
Shane Ryan, international team competition aficionado that he is, catalogs the crucial attributes of great captain’s picks.
Here are two…”Form…As strange as it might sound, a player’s form entering a match-play exhibition doesn’t matter as much as logic says it should. Yes, you can find examples of bad form persisting, as we famously saw with Webb Simpson in the 2014 Ryder Cup at Gleneagles, but more often the cauldron of a Cup renders recent results less critical than many believe. The heightened pressure, along with the format change to match play and the addition of a team, tends to stop individual momentum.”
“Ferocity…Fear is a killer. We see it over and over again, and of the Ryder Cups I’ve covered, one of the most memorable one-offs came in 2014 at Gleneagles. Paul McGinley, in an otherwise perfect captaincy, made his lone “mistake” when he selected native Scotsman Stephen Gallacher as a captain’s pick and never played him after the first session when it became clear that the stage was too big for him. (I put “mistake” in quotes because from a diplomacy angle, McGinley had to pick a Scotsman to play on a team competing in Scotland.) But it was most prominent in 2016, when Darren Clarke’s English rookies-Chris Wood, Danny Willett, Andy Sullivan, and Matthew Fitzpatrick-looked like they wanted to dig a hole in the Minnesota earth and bury themselves. Meanwhile, fellow rookie Thomas Pieters dealt with the hostile environment by decimating almost every American who stood in his way, including another fairly tough rookie named Brooks Koepka. Why? Because Pieters is a badass, and his English teammates were not. It doesn’t mean he’ll have a better career than the English four, or even that he’s a better player-it means that when faced with high pressure and a mano-a-mano duel, he’s up for it. He even enjoys it.”

Full piece.

3. Brutal DQ
Alex Myers with the horror story…“At the second stage of Q school, Luis Gagne put himself in decent shape after an opening round 70 in Plantation, Fla. Or so he thought. Turns out, Gagne left the course without signing his scorecard and was disqualified. Thanks to Ryan French (Monday Q Info) for first noticing this unfortunate occurrence.”
  • “Monday Q Info…The rules of golf can be harsh at times…Luis Gagne who is at 2nd in Plantation forgot to sign his scorecard before leaving the scoring area, the penalty for doing so…Disqualification. He had shot a -1 70 before being DQ’d. Gagne was ranked 24th in WAGR before turning pro”

Full piece.

4. European Tour ROY race
Golfweek’s Alistair Tait…”The Race to Dubai isn’t the only sprint to the finish over the remaining three tournaments of the 2019 European Tour season. There’s a pretty good contest to see who’ll become the Sir Henry Cotton Rookie of the Year, too.”
  • “Kurt Kitayama, Robert MacIntyre, Adri Arnaus and Guido Migliozzi wouldn’t have featured on my list of possible contenders to follow in the footsteps of future stars like Jon Rahm, Brooks Koepka, Martin Kaymer, Paul Casey, Ian Poulter, Sergio Garcia, Thomas Bjorn, Colin Montgomerie, Jose Maria Olazabal, Sandy Lyle and Nick Faldo.”
5. Lucy Li turns pro
Golf Digest’s Alex Myers…”The San Francisco Chronicle’s Ron Kroichick first reported the news on Wednesday after getting confirmation from Li’s mom. But it’s a move that surprised no one following Li’s T-72 at Stage 2 of LPGA Q School last month. Following that performance, which didn’t advance her to the final stage, but did earn her Symetra Tour status for next season, Li said the following”
“I’m excited to be playing here and really looking forward to the Symetra Tour next year, then hopefully take that jump to the next level.”

Full piece.

6. AJGA POY
Meet Max Moldovan, match play maestro and AJGA POY
Golfweek’s Julie Williams…“Maxwell Moldovan isn’t someone you’d want to meet on the other side of a match-play bracket. On his way to winning the Polo Golf Junior Classic at Liberty National this summer then helping the East Team win the Wyndham Cup, the 17-year-old Uniontown, Ohio, native compiled a 9-0-1 match-play record. For such strong play, Moldovan earned the American Junior Golf Association’s highest honor: Rolex Player of the Year.”
  • “I had a really good year … definitely the best of my career so far,” Moldovan said. “My goal was to finish in the top 15 in Invitationals and try to win an AJGA tournament. I won in 2016 and 2017, but not last year. I can’t thank God, my family and friends enough for all they’ve done in my life. My faith has led to great things and winning this award is a true honor that reflects God’s glory.”

Full piece for the rundown of first and second-teamers.

7. Colin Montgomerie: course designer
Simon Cambers of the New York Times talked with Monty, designer of this week’s European Tour venue in Turkey…”What does it mean to you, and to the club itself, for the Montgomerie Maxx Royal to be holding the Turkish Open again this year? It is a fantastic honor, having designed a course that I am very proud of and one that is hosting its fourth Rolex event, one of a number of premier European Tour events.”
  • “Marc Stein has covered Jordan. He’s covered Kobe. And LeBron vs. the Warriors. Go behind the N.B.A.’s curtain with basketball’s foremost expert.”
  • “How would you describe the challenges presented by the Montgomerie Maxx Royal?”…”It can be played by all types of golfers. I particularly like the par 3s, which are very challenging. All the par 5s are risk-reward, which tests even the best European Tour pros. The green designs are such that the pin positions can be in some quite difficult and challenging positions. Therefore, hitting the fairways is a must, to allow the player to attack the pins. I particularly like the 12th hole. It is a very strong par 4, one where you have to hit the fairway, and then your second shot is very demanding, played into an undulating green. But really, I am very proud of all 18 holes.”

Full piece.

8. Ever wondered what’s in Tiger Woods’ pockets on the golf course?
…no, this isn’t the start to a lewd joke, but rather…
Peter Morrice at Golf Digest...”In the final episode of “My Game: Tiger Woods,” you’ll go behind the scenes at the shoots and hear some of the small things that go into Tiger’s game. Here’s a fun one: What does Tiger carry on him when he plays?”
“In my right-front pocket, there’s always a quarter, a divot tool and at least three tees. In my left-front pocket, there’s my Chapstick,” Tiger says. “If it’s cool and damp, my glove is always in my front-left pocket. If it’s hot out, I’ll air it out in my back-left pocket. Other than that, I really don’t have any quirks [smiles].”
9. A most interesting morsel
From the Twitterverse…Interesting excavation of a mention of “advice seeking” in the form of peeking into another player’s bag in a 1953 newspaper article on Ben Hogan’s U.S. Open victory, pointed out by Jeff Martin on Twitter.
See it in the image below.
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Morning 9: Brandon Matthews is a good man | The art of the painful comeback | Are the Rules still too complicated?

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1. Singular stuff
Pretty impressive stuff from Brandon Matthews. Via Julie Williams at Golfweek…”Matthews, 25, entered a sudden death playoff with Ricardo Celia on Sunday after both reached 11 under for 72 holes.”
  • “The two men tied the first two holes, and as Matthews stood over an eight-footer for birdie to extend the playoff to a fourth hole, a yell rang out from the crowd. Matthews missed the putt, despite having felt his putter was dialed in all week.”
  • “…The missed putt was perhaps season-altering. It handed Celia the title. Matthews was frustrated in the moment, but that was before the pieces came together.”
  • “As it turns out, the voice belonged to a middle-aged man with Down Syndrome, a detail Matthews only came to know because a tour official sought him out to offer an explanation in the locker room after the playoff ended, according to Golf Digest reporting.”
  • “Matthews immediately returned to the course to meet with the man, sign a glove and assure him that he was not upset.”

Full piece.

2. Back-to-back for Brendon Todd
AP report…”Two tournaments, two victories…They didn’t make Brendon Todd forget about the dark years, when he had the full yips so bad he didn’t know where the ball was going and made only two cuts in 35 events he played over three years.”
  • “They just made him appreciate how good it feels to be back…Todd returned Monday morning and quickly holed an 18-foot birdie putt for a 1-shot lead, then closed with two nervy pars for a 3-under 68 to win the Mayakoba Golf Classic for his second straight PGA Tour victory. He won the inaugural Bermuda Championship two weeks ago.”

Full piece.

3. The art of the painful comeback 
Shane Ryan on the incredible resurgence of Brendon Todd…
“The dark days couldn’t have been far from his mind.”
  • “I really lost it,” Todd said of the first long slump of his career. “I would get to the first tee, no confidence, nervous, and I’d hit it 50 yards right. It might go out-of-bounds, and from there it would be an all-day grind just to keep the ball in play. Then I’d chip and putt phenomenally, shoot 75, and miss the cut.”
  • “At home, Todd would break down crying with his wife, Rachel, and though he never lost his desire to play, he began to question whether there was a real future. He knew he could get a regular job if he needed to, and a lot of people had it much worse, but that didn’t make him feel any better.”

Full piece. 

4. Love’s Plantation Course redesign
PGATour.com’s Sean Martin on Davis Love III’s work giving the Plantation Course a facelift…
  • “And that’s what the World Golf Hall of Famer did, hopping on a bulldozer to shape some of the sharp angles and old-school features that will be on display this week during the PGA TOUR’s annual visit to Sea Island. The Plantation Course will be used, along with the neighboring Seaside layout, on Thursday and Friday. The RSM’s weekend rounds will be played on Seaside.”
  • “The Plantation Course’s new look is a blast from the past, drawing upon the course’s history and other attributes common to golf’s Golden Age designs.”
  • “Plantation is the oldest course at Sea Island. The Walter Travis design opened as a nine-hole course in 1928, shortly before the Seaside nine that was designed by Harry Colt and Charles Alison.”
5. Are the Rules of Golf still too complicated?
The Golf.com team debated that question (among others) in Tour Confidential…
  • “Russell Henley was penalized eight strokes at the Mayakoba Golf Classic for violating the One-Ball Rule. Henley used a slightly different Titleist ProV1x model for holes 9-12, and that violation of Rule 20-3 cost him two strokes per hole (he missed the cut). This comes days after a bizarre Billy Mayfair rules controversy was reported by Michael Bamberger, and in a calendar year when a considerable number of rules infractions have made headlines. Almost a year after the governing bodies made sweeping changes to the rule book, are the rules still too complicated?”
  • “Josh Sens, contributor (@JoshSens): No. There are too many of them for the average player to expect to know them all offhand. But overly complicated? There’s nothing especially murky or obscure about the rules that have been violated recently. Where things have gotten muddy is in how certain people have responded to those violations. But that has to do with the complexities of human nature, not the rules themselves.”
  • “Michael Bamberger, senior writer: With Josh. Casual golf cannot be played with obsessive following of the rules. Serious tournament golf requires it. What Henley did show is that he could not live with himself had he known he played in violation of the rules. There’s a sound reason for that rule. If you want to get rid of it, start a petition, but you won’t get far. Henley set the right example.”

Full piece.

6. Wanna buy a golf course? 
Todd Kelly at Golfweek…”The Spring Valley Golf Club in Elizabeth, Colorado, is going up for auction Tuesday, Nov. 19, according to businessden.com. The course is located about 40 miles southeast of downtown Denver.”
  • “The 18-hole, par-72, 7,200-yard (from the tips) course opened in 1998. The land was previously a working cattle ranch. The 240-acre property includes the course, a restaurant, a maintenance facility and a pro shop as well as two adjacent vacant parcels of land.”
  • “The businessden.com story reports that the Haynes Family LTD sold the property in 2003 for $3.8 million, then re-acquired it in 2010.”
7. Financial security for LPGA pros
Golfweek’s Beth Ann Nichols with some perspective…”Sunday’s unprecedented payday at the CME Group Tour Championship – $1.5 million to the winner – could be a life-changing day for one of the 60 players at Tiburon Golf Club. Unlike previous years, anyone in the field can claim the big prize. The total purse for the week is $5 million.”
  • “CME’s commitment to raise the bar sends a message to current and potential sponsors, and everyone else, that women’s golf deserves more. There are favorites – World No. 1 Jin Young Ko, Nelly Korda and Lexi Thompson to name a few ­- but Caroline Masson believes that any of the 60 players here can win the CME. In fact, she’s hoping someone unsuspecting grabs the title to further illustrate the depth of the LPGA. Twenty different players have won on the women’s tour this season. The last player in the field to gain entry happens to be Lewis, a former No. 1.”

Full piece.

8. Dinner at DL3’s
Golfweek’s Forecaddie…”As far as The Man Out Front is concerned, the best Tuesday night meal of the golf year isn’t the Champions Dinner at Augusta National. That may be the most coveted invite, but The Forecaddie can attest that it doesn’t get much better than the RSM Classic’s pro-am draw party hosted in a tent in the backyard of former U.S. Ryder Cup captain and World Golf Hall of Famer Davis Love III.”
  • “This is the 10th year Love has played host to more than 250 of his newest and closest friends willing to fork over $8,000, or $22,000 for a threesome, for the opportunity to play in the tournament pro-am on Wednesday. There’s nothing else on the PGA Tour quite like a night under the oaks feasting on the best low-country cuisine that can be had at DL3’s digs, A.K.A. Sinclair Plantation.”
9. ICYMI: The greatest shank
Our Gianni Magliocco…”While the claim of greatest shank ever is undoubtedly subjective, you’ll do well to find a hosel rocket which proved more effective than Joachim Hansen’s during Saturday’s round at the Nedbank Golf Challenge.”
  • “On the par-4 18th during the third round, Hansen found himself in the greenside bunker where his spectacular shank caused his ball to cannon into a bank and ricochet perfectly onto the green and end up just a foot away from the hole.”
  • “Fellow pro’s posted their tongue in cheek thoughts on the shot, with Luke Donald stating “Perfect spin control”, while Dylan Frittelli went into more in-depth analysis saying “Textbook bunker play. Hit two inches behind the ball, hosel-rocket to bank shot to reading the break perfectly.”

See it here.

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Tour Rundown: Tri-Eagle Fleet, Todd, Celia

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We’re going to give you a preview of next week’s events, before running down the trio of tournaments from last week. In Naples, Florida, the LPGA Tour season will close at the CME Group Tour Championship. The European Tour will arrive in Dubai for its Race To Dubai finale. Along Georgia’s coastline, the PGA Tour will conclude official 2019 play at the RSM Classic. The weekend before the USA’s Thanksgiving holiday will bring an enviable conclusion to this calendar year’s top-shelf tournament golf.

Back to the present! Three events figured in this week’s touring schedule. The PGA Tour was hosted by Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula, at Mayakoba. The European Tour’s penultimate event took place at Gary Player’s joint in South Africa. Finally, the Silver City of Argentina, Buenos Aires, hosted the 2nd-last tournament of the PGA Tour Latinoamerica schedule. Without further delay, have a tasty read of our Tour Rundown for Monday, November 18th.

Tri-Eagle Fleet fleeces Kinault for Nebank Championship

Tommy Fleetwood has 5 European Tour wins. Given his Ryder Cup record, we’re always surprised it isn’t a larger total of triumphs. In South Africa this weekend, Fleetwood saved his best for last, a Sunday 65 that took him from 12th place to a tie for 1st at round’s end. Joining him at that number was Sweden’s Marcus Kinhult, 1 of 3 players to post 4 rounds below par (none of them won, sadly.) Fleetwood absolutely decimated the par five holes at GPGC in round 4: 3 eagles and 1 birdie allowed him to figure in 3 bogies (plus 3 more birdies) in his 65. On Kinhault’s part, 68 should have been good enough to claim a  2nd Euro Tour win for 2019, but along came Fleetwood. On playoff hole 1, the Englishman made par to the Swede’s bogey, and matters were resolved. On to Dubai, and the Tour Championship.

For those who love suffering, the Gary Player Golf Club is their cup of tea. The final threesome, consisting of Zander Lombard, Louis Oosthuizen, and Thomas Detry, played its final round in a combined 12 strokes above par. The kikuyu rough usually doesn’t swallow orbs, but it does redirect club heads in an exasperating manner. Same goes for chipping around the green (reference Graeme McDowell’s putter-toe chip on Saturday.) The closing stretch enjoys a dalliance with water, compelling errant shots to lay up in regulation. Purists eschew such disastrous hazards, but there is no denying their ability to change the course of a round in an instant.

Mayakoba held up a day by darkness

Brend0n Todd just became Steve Stricker’s 1st Ryder Cup nightmare. With his 2nd consecutive win on the PGA Tour, Todd jumped to the front of the Ryder Cup list for 2020. His resurrection is the talk of the fall, but will it sustain through September of 2020? Between us, I love this type of story! The Mayakoba event finished Monday morning, thanks to delays and darkness. Todd went to sleep in a tie with Vaughn Taylor, at -20. When things resumed, the Bermuda champion was able to finish with pars for a 264 on the week. Unfortunately for Taylor, no birdies and one crushing bogey came his way. Taylor fell into a tie for 2nd with Carlos Ortiz, the home-country favorite, and Adam Long. Both Long and Ortiz finished cleanly, but each lacked that one birdie extra to catch Todd. Cone to think of it, perhaps Stricker looks forward to having Todd on his team. Like Todd, Stricker traveled the comeback trail on multiple occasions, and played his best golf after dealing with swing demons. Here’s to Wisconsin in 2020, and the appearance of Brendon Todd in RWB and stars and stripes.

Open de Argentina to Celia in playoff

After rounds of 69-67-63, not much good was happening for Augusto Nunez on Sunday. He was even par through 10, still in the lead, when the wheels fell off. The coming 5 holes brought 2 bogies and 2 doubles, and the Argentine hope was dashed, as he tumbled to -6 and a 7th-place tie. With the door wide open, Colombia’s Ricardo Celia and the USA’s Brandon Mathews took full advantage. They clawed their way to -11, one shot clear of Jarod Wolfe, and away they went to a playoff. After two turns across the 18th, the duo dropped to the par-3 17th. Celia ended it there, with a delightful birdie for the win. The title moved the Colombian from 55th to 13th in the Order of Merit standings, giving him an outside shot at a Korn Ferry Tour promotion. More than likely, a 2nd consecutive victory at the tour championship next month will be needed. Surprising, too, was the final-nine collapse by Nunez. More was expected from the OOM leader, but the stumble confirmed that even the finest professional golfers are human.

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Morning 9: Tommy triumphant | Monday finish at Mayakoba | A death blow for amateur golf?

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1. Tommy triumphant
Hard to believe Fairway Jesus hadn’t won in almost 2 years!
Sport24 report…”Tommy Fleetwood waited 22 months for a win, and when it came it was big
  • “The Englishman won the richest first-place cheque on the European Tour this week of $2.5 million with his playoff victory in the Nedbank Golf Challenge hosted by Gary Player at the Gary Player Country Club on Sunday.”
  • “He did so with a final round of 65 including three eagles, and then beat Sweden’s Marcus Kinhult on the first extra hole of a playoff after both finished tied for the lead on 12-under par.”

Full piece.

2. Monday finish
Golf Channel’s Will Gray…”It’ll take another day to decide a winner at the Mayakoba Golf Classic.”
  • “After heavy rains washed out all play on Thursday, tournament officials have been playing catch-up all weekend along the Mexican coast. That meant more than 30 holes Sunday the leaders, who began third-round play in the morning and will now return to the course at 7:30 a.m. ET Monday with Brendon Todd and Vaughn Taylor tied for the lead.”
  • “Todd started the final round with a one-shot lead and is in search of his second win in as many starts after capturing the Bermuda Championship earlier this month. He’s at 20 under and will face a 20-foot birdie putt on No. 15 when play resumes.”

Full piece.

3. No brotherly advice
Golfweek’s Eamon Lynch…”…25-year-old…Chase Koepka. He earned his status on both the Challenge and European Tours, and next month faces final qualifying for the Korn Ferry Tour. Success will bring him one step closer to joining his brother Brooks on the PGA Tour, but he isn’t planning to rely on his celebrated sibling for advice on tackling the four-round gauntlet at Orange County National near Orlando.”
  • “He’s probably not the person I would lean on because he’s never really done well in Q-School,” Chase says with a laugh. “He knows that. He’s better at major championships than he is at Q-School.”

Full piece.

4. New caddie (for a week) 
Golfweek’s Forecaddie…”This week’s DP World Tour Championship in Dubai will be Rory McIlroy’s 25th and last start of the year, but it will be the first for his new caddie. And the last.”
  • “The Forecaddie hears McIlroy’s bag will be toted in the European Tour’s season finale by his pal Niall O’Connor. But the gig is a one-off assignment for O’Connor, who will head back to his regular job in private equity in New York City next week.”
  • “McIlroy’s regular bagman, Harry Diamond, is taking time at home in Belfast to enjoy fatherhood. Diamond’s wife, Claire, gave birth to their first child, Georgia Iris, on Nov. 11. Mom, dad and baby are all doing well, The Man Out Front is assured.”
5. Hole-in-ones come in bunches on the PGA Tour now? 
An interesting phenomenon! Golf Digest’s Ryan Herrington…”Early in Sunday’s final round at the El Cameleon course in Playa del Carmen, Mexico, defending Mayakoba champion Matt Kuchar holed this shot on the par-3 eighth hole….Five minutes later, Brian Gay stepped to tee on the par-3 10th hole and watched as this happened.”
  • “…How often do you see a pair of holes-in-one in such a short span?…Well, actually it happened just two days earlier at Mayakoba. On Friday during the rain-delayed first round, Cameron Tringale and Chase Seiffert made holes-in-one on the par-3 fourth … in consecutive groups. According to PGATour.com, the last time players in back-to-back groups made holes in one came in the third round of the 2013 Northern Trust on the 14th hole at Liberty National (K.J. Choi and Greg Chalmers). Prior to that it had at the 2004 Masters with Padraig Harrington and Kirk Triplett.”

Full piece.

6. 8-stroke penalty! 
You may have missed it earlier in the course of the OHL Classic: Russell Henley was penalized two strokes on three consecutive holes. How did it happen?
  • Christopher Powers at Golf Digest…”it came to Henley’s attention that he had accidentally used a ball other than his usual Titleist Pro V1x during the round. This is a violation of the PGA Tour’s One Ball Rule, not a part of the Rules of Golf, but is usually only adopted for professional golf tournaments as well as high-level amateur events. The rule requires players to use the same ball throughout the round, meaning Henley violated the rule if he did not use the same Titleist Pro V1x model that he began the day with.”
  • “It was a small dash, a different way it was marked that would have been easy to overlook,” said PGA Tour Rules Official Brad Fabel. “He came to us and said he didn’t know how it had gotten in his bag.”
  • “Henley’s reward for calling himself out? Eight penalty strokes, as he figured he used a different model ball on holes 9-12. He was given a two-stroke penalty on each hole, giving him a 77 instead of a 69…”

Full piece.

7. Poke takes control 
Golfweek’s Alistair Tait…”Denmark’s Benjamin Poke is in control of the European Tour Qualifying School at the halfway stage. The 27-year-old takes a two-shot lead into the final three days at Lumine Golf Club in Tarragona, Spain. The Danish professional is hoping to take the lead card of the 25 on offer for the 2020 European Tour.”
  • “Poke had four birdies and only one bogey in a 3-under par round of 69 on Lumine Golf Club’s Hills Course. He sits at 12-under par.”
  • “Lars van Meijel of The Netherlands lies in second place after a 7-under 65 that included six birdies and an eagle-two on the Hills Course’s par four 12th hole.”

Full piece.

8. “Amateur golf is doomed” files
Interesting perspective from Geoff Shackelford…”I’m loathe to pick on Sierra Brooks for turning pro hot off her Q-Series T-62 finish, guaranteeing Symetra Tour status. A perk she will take while conceding her final few months at Florida where she’s one of college golf’s best players on one of its best teams.  But I will anyway.”
  • “After all, Brooks is one of many players-male or female-choosing to end her college career to turn pro even if the awaiting opportunities pale in comparison to the college golf structure.”
  • “Golf is just the latest sport to, in seemingly sound ways, to address the desire of athletes and those around them to test the professional waters with rules that allow players to retain their amateur status while playing at Q-School.”

Full piece.

9. Tommy Fleetwood’s winning WITB
What the Englishman had in his bag for the Nedbank Golf Challenge
Driver: TaylorMade M5 (9 degrees @7.75)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage XTS 70TX (44.75 inches)
3-wood: TaylorMade M6 (15 degrees bent to 14.25)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana DF 70X (42.5 inches)
5-wood: TaylorMade M6 (19 degrees bent to 18.5)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF 80TX (41.5 inches)
Irons: TaylorMade GAPR Lo (@18.75), Srixon Z785 (4, 5-iron), TaylorMade P7TW (6-9)
Shafts: GAPR: Project X 6.5 (39.5 inches), 4, 5-irons: Project X 6.5 (38.5 inches), 6- 9-irons: Project X 6.5
Wedges: Titleist Vokey SM7 Raw (47, 52, 60 degrees)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400
Putter: Odyssey White Hot Pro #3
Grip: Super Stroke Mid Slim 2.0
Ball: Titleist ProV1x

 

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