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Forum Thread of the Day: “Best method for curing the shanks?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from Yieeman who asks WRXers for their advice on methods to solve the dreaded “S” word. Our members share their suggestions which include swing tips as well as practice drills.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • balls_deep: “So I had the shanks earlier this year, and it was driving me nuts. Watched lots of videos and did the standard drills – standing further from the ball, second ball outside addressed ball etc. etc. and nothing worked. I was talking to my FIL who has also struggled with them, and he said he thought his head was moving towards the ball on the backswing. I started to think about this and started messing with it, and it actually fixed it. It was mostly happening to me on 3/4 wedges, and I realized my head was moving forward slightly. Try it out – might make a bit difference. I now feel like I’m more on my heels, and I keep my head back during the swing and boom. Wedges lethal again.”
  • PorscheFan: “I can tell you that while the Mizuno MP33 wasn’t the best for shank dispersion, it had amazing feel. You could feel exactly where you hit it on the hosel… If you hit it right on the center of the hosel it was just pure… Like off-COG butter. Best feeling in the world. Made me want to shank more just to get that feeling.”
  • Milfordlefty: “Do you shank hybrids or fairway woods? If not, look for a set all hybrid style irons, an example is Cleveland golf Launcher HB irons. Or try this change at address. It is likely your arms are moving out from your body in the downswing. Address the ball with the toe on the ball. If you are moving arms out, you’ll move middle of club to ball. Try it. See a pro for a lesson to figure out why arms are moving out.”
  • Ri_Redneck: “By definition, a shank is only a fraction of an inch from being a perfect shot. You’re returning the club to the ball slightly further out than you normally do. For me, I do it when I start really focusing on my line and unconsciously start crowding the ball. The preshot routine has usually gotten sloppy when this happens.”

Entire Thread: “Best method for curing the shanks?”

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Gianni is a freelance writer. He holds a Bachelor of Arts as well as a Diploma in Sports Journalism. He can be contacted at gmagliocco@outlook.com. Follow him on Twitter @giannimosquito

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Ryan

    Oct 23, 2019 at 10:57 am

    I have gone through the shanks once a year for about my entire life. Its always the same thing. I stand a little too close and swing way to far out to in. I found that even standing to far from the ball can still cause a shank because of the over the top swing path. I take two clubs lay the top one of the other side of the ball for target line and then lay the other at my feet but at a 45 degree angle for my swing path. Then I swing along that path. It forces me to drop the club inside and hit the inside of the ball which puts my miss out on the toe which is the instant cure for the shanks. It takes a little faith to do it and I usually hit them thin for a while until I regroove that swing. Playing in the midwest, we only get to play consistently March to November. Coming out of the offseason in March would usually produce a shank for the first month or so, until I started doing this drill. Once I hit one shank, I would start doing this and they would leave.

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Courses that are now obsolete on Tour due to power in the game?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from Titleist99 who asks WRXers if they feel some golf courses are now obsolete on Tour due to the ever-growing power element in the game. Some of our members list tracks which they think will struggle to host majors again, while others explain why they feel every famous course still has its place on the calendar.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • oikos1: “The courses aren’t obsolete because most fans enjoy seeing a course overpowered. Golf traditionalists may not like it but just look at other sports today. Sure, a no-no, once it gets to the 7th becomes interesting, but most fans want to see homers and runs scored. Same in basketball, no one wants a pro game ending at 60-54 and football clearly is shooting for high scoring passing affairs. The majority of golf fans just don’t want to watch pro’s grind it out every week. They want to cheer for birdies and eagles. They want to see if the impossible is possible, the potential for crazy good. Bring on the 54 in golf! So no, golf courses aren’t becoming obsolete. PGA Tour attendance has been on the rise the last three years. If anything, they are looking at ways to make the events bigger and will seek venues that allow for just that.”
  • LICC: “Some former Majors courses that are now too short for the majors: St. Louis, Canterbury, Northwood, Prestwick, Myopia, Five Farms, Wannamoisett, Chicago Golf Club.”
  • Obee: “The problem with the shorter courses is that the Tour players don’t like having driver taken out of their hands. And that’s really all it is. They get ‘bored.’I get it; it does take away a large part of the game. But I would love to see them play more short courses were drivers taken out of their hands on a good number of holes. But as far as ‘obsolete’ goes. None of the courses are obsolete. They are just different.”
  • NJpatbee: “Course design and not just length add to the difficulty of a course. Pine Valley will never host a pro tournament because of their inability to handle the crowds; I would speculate that even the regular tees would be a challenge for the PGA Tour pros. The Championship Tees would be a bear. Now, I have never played there, but I am available if any member wishes to invite me!”
  • Titleist99: “PGA TOUR might want to add a little rough to protect our classic courses..”

Entire Thread: “Courses that are now obsolete on tour due to power in the game?”

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WRX Forum Buzzz

Forum Thread of the Day: “How hard do you swing?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from jjfcpa who asks fellow WRXers how hard they swing and what the overall result is depending on what per cent they swing at the ball. Our members discuss their methods and how going after it harder or softer can rely on the situation and club being used.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Moo: “Driver where it matters…100% Short par 4 where it doesn’t matter, 80%. The rest of the clubs, 80%. But, I think the % thing is a guess for me. It’s about control and release for me. I can get quick and get some bad results, so I’m always trying to find that balance point that gives me good distance, but excellent contact and direction. Also, at 54, there are days when my 100% is not the same 100% as the day before, so there is that variable.”
  • cardoustie: “Close to full past 200. 150-200 at 90. Short irons … 75-80%”
  • MtlJeff: “I’m not sure anyone, even pros truly swings at 100 per cent. Literally as hard as you can on every shot? Unlikely though it’s probably closer than most think. 80 is waaaaay to low. Do you know what 80 per cent of 115mph swing speed is? 92mph. I probably didn’t swing driver at 92mph all of last year on any individual swing. If you swing your 7 iron at 90mph. That would mean your average 7 iron you’re swinging around 72mph. I know there’s more to it than just pure swing speed numbers, but you get the idea. 92 to 95% is probably realistic for many.”
  • TheSphynx: “Ever since tiger said he swings 80% in that book… everyone’s brain is stuck on swinging 80%. I just have a hard time believing that when someone pulls a 7 iron, and their “stock” swing is 80mph; they have the ability to ramp it up to 100mph.”
  • dbornack: “I’m about 90% on everything. Sometimes I get a little too hard with driver, been working to back that off a bit. Which is funny, when I just “try to hit it straight” it ends up going further.”

Entire Thread: “How hard do you swing?”

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “58 vs 60-degree wedge”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from xyckin who is looking to find the perfect wedge for 100-yard shots. Currently, with his 60-degree wedge, xyckin excels on short shots and from the bunker, but without wanting to compromise on those shots, he is considering changing to a 58-degree club in order to hit a comfortable “high 100-yard shot”. Our members share their advice.

Here are a few posts from the thread but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • ChipNRun: “It takes quite a touch to hit full shots with an LW – be it 58* or 60*. It appears you may be experiencing the lob effect with your 60*. The lob effect is the point(s) in your wedge mix at which going from to a fuller swing launches the ball higher, but not much longer. I have found the first 60* LW since before 2000 that I can hit reliably. Still, anything more than a 3/4 swing is unstable and unreliable. It’s not just with LWs. A few years back, I found a Wilson SW that picked up the lob effect at more than a half swing. Half swing = 60 yards / 3/4 swing = 70 yards // full swing = ??whatever?? In your case, it seems a 58* would give you a little extra distance to fill in your yardage gap.”
  • rt_charger: “Not to be that person but I would highly recommend not trying to choose 58 or 60 based on distances – depending on what manufacturer, chose based on bounce (some don’t have a 58 or 60 mold and bend to get loft affecting bounce) and on your need to hit lower or higher shots floppy/pitch shots around the green. I myself prefer a 60 to get more loft on flop shots; I hit it full once in a blue moon when I have a front pin, the exact yardage, and the right conditions to do so; I also carry 4 wedges and consider myself a short game specialist.”
  • dalehead: “I choose my lob wedge on how it performs around the green and out of bunkers not how it performs on full shots. If I need to take 10 yards or so off my 54 I choke it down an inch and make a full swing. Gives me better results than trying to hit the lob wedge hard.”
  • RainShadow: “I went to a 58* many years ago and haven’t looked back: more consistent full shots ( Rarely used for those) and same function around greens. I use mine as 75yd full. 54* goes 90yd full, 50*GW is 105 Full. Learned to control distances with all wedges and short irons….develop those golf skills.”

Entire Thread: “58 vs 60-degree wedge”

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