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Swing Sequence: Steve Stricker by Golf Digest

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By Ron Kaspriske
Golf Digest
Edited By Peter Morrice
Photos by J.D. Cuban

Quietly getting it done

Most golfers would kill to have Ernie Els’ easy rhythm or Phil Mickelson’s hand-eye coordination, but you rarely hear anyone say they want to swing like Steve Stricker.

“Ha! I guess not. But they should,” says Dennis Tiziani, Stricker’s father-in-law and swing coach. “I can’t think of a swing of a world-class player that’s easier to copy.”

The key to Stricker’s swing is, it has fewer moving parts: It’s a stiff-wristed action controlled by a big body turn. Most better players maximize wrist hinge on the backswing to gain leverage at impact — like cracking a whip — but Stricker’s wrists are fairly quiet. That’s why his swing is shorter, and why he’s among the top 30 on tour in hitting fairways.

“When you hinge, you need good timing to hit the ball where you want,” Stricker says. “By trying to eliminate wrist cock, my swing’s more under control.”

If you think J.B. Holmes’ and Bubba Watson’s swings look violent and powerful, you’d probably say Stricker’s is slow and graceful. But he generates power by turning his body and rotating his forearms back and through, compared to the last-second snap of the wrists you see in many top players. Tiziani says Stricker’s armsy action is more reliable under pressure.

“I try to make it simple. I take the left arm, rotate it to the top and don’t worry about the wrist set,” Stricker says. “I try to be as firm with my wrists as I can, and just turn through. I feel like that’s a more consistent way.”
–Ron Kaspriske
——————-
AGE: 43 | HEIGHT: 6-feet | DRIVER: Titleist 909 D3, 8.5 deg. | BALL: Titleist Pro V1 (2007) | DRIVING DISTANCE (RANK): 278.8 yards (124th) | DRIVING ACCURACY (RANK): 67.7 percent of fairways (26th)

Here’s a tour swing you can copy
The world’s No. 4 player has a simple, repeatable move

Most golfers would kill to have Ernie Els’ easy rhythm or Phil Mickelson’s hand-eye coordination, but you rarely hear anyone say they want to swing like Steve Stricker.

“Ha! I guess not. But they should,” says Dennis Tiziani, Stricker’s father-in-law and swing coach. “I can’t think of a swing of a world-class player that’s easier to copy.”

The key to Stricker’s swing is, it has fewer moving parts: It’s a stiff-wristed action controlled by a big body turn. Most better players maximize wrist hinge on the backswing to gain leverage at impact — like cracking a whip — but Stricker’s wrists are fairly quiet. That’s why his swing is shorter, and why he’s among the top 30 on tour in hitting fairways.

“When you hinge, you need good timing to hit the ball where you want,” Stricker says. “By trying to eliminate wrist cock, my swing’s more under control.”

If you think J.B. Holmes’ and Bubba Watson’s swings look violent and powerful, you’d probably say Stricker’s is slow and graceful. But he generates power by turning his body and rotating his forearms back and through, compared to the last-second snap of the wrists you see in many top players. Tiziani says Stricker’s armsy action is more reliable under pressure.

“I try to make it simple. I take the left arm, rotate it to the top and don’t worry about the wrist set,” Stricker says. “I try to be as firm with my wrists as I can, and just turn through. I feel like that’s a more consistent way.”
–Ron Kaspriske

His lack of wrist set keeps the face from rotating open.

When his right elbow gets behind him, like here, he can overcook his draw.

Steve keeps his right heel down to use the ground for leverage.

This is great sequencing of the body at the ball: hips open, shoulders dead square.

You can tell Steve hits a draw because his left forearm is higher than his right.

Read More http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-instruction/swing-sequences/2010-08/photos-steve-stricker#ixzz1fdL664QD

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Mark Winkler

    Feb 17, 2012 at 7:40 am

    Try to copy this swing and game improvement is immediate, from chipping to driver your game will improve, trust me!

    • Jason

      Jul 2, 2014 at 6:46 am

      Can you go into any kind of detail on setup and maybe a feel for the backswing?

      Are his wrist really uncocked at address? So high hands?

      His chipping stuff (like Dan Carraher’s) has helped me tremendously.

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Instruction

Golf 101: What is a strong grip?

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What is a strong grip? Before we answer that, consider this: How you grip it might be the first thing you learn, and arguably the first foundation you adapt—and it can form the DNA for your whole golf swing.

The proper way to hold a golf club has many variables: hand size, finger size, sports you play, where you feel strength, etc. It’s not an exact science. However, when you begin, you will get introduced to the common terminology for describing a grip—strong, weak, and neutral.

Let’s focus on the strong grip as it is, in my opinion, the best way to hold a club when you are young as it puts the clubface in a stronger position at the top and instinctively encourages a fair bit of rotation to not only hit it solid but straight.

The list of players on tour with strong grips is long: Dustin Johnson, Zach Johnson, Bubba Watson, Fred Couples, David Duval, and Bernhard Langer all play with a strong grip.

But what is a strong grip? Well like my first teacher Mike Montgomery (Director of Golf at Glendale CC in Seattle) used to say to me, “it looks like you are revving up a Harley with that grip”. Point is the knuckles on my left hand were pointing to the sky and my right palm was facing the same way.

Something like this:

Of course, there are variations to it, but that is your run of the mill, monkey wrench strong grip. Players typically will start there when they are young and tweak as they gain more experience. The right hand might make it’s way more on top, left-hand knuckles might show two instead of three, and the club may move its way out of the palms and further down into the fingers.

Good golf can be played from any position you find comfortable, especially when you find the body matchup to go with it.

Watch this great vid from @JakeHuttGolf

In very simple terms, here are 3 pros and 3 cons of a strong grip.

Pros

  1. Encourages a closed clubface which helps deloft the club at impact and helps you hit further
  2. It’s an athletic position which encourages rotation
  3. Players with strong grips tend to strike it solidly

Cons

  1. Encourages a closed clubface which helps deloft the club at impact and can cause you to hit it low and left
  2. If you don’t learn to rotate you could be in for a long career of ducks and trees
  3. Players with strong grips tend to fight a hook and getting the ball in the air

 

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Clement: Driver lesson to max out distance and help you get fit properly

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This is an essential video on how to get you prepared for a driver fitting at your local Club Champion or favorite golf shop or store. I will be showing you two essential drills that we use at Wisdom In Golf, which will get you in the right focus for your driver fitting session which will also give you way more accuracy and consistency out on the golf course. What you should be looking for before your fitting session is the consistency of the golf ball hitting the center face of the driver and your ability to maintain an ascending angle of attack to your target.

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Shawn Clement’s Wisdom in Golf has been going against mainstream instruction for the last 40 years. Before that, we had the Snead Squat, and the teachings of Bobby Jones and Jack Nicklaus and Wisdom in Golf has taken it from there while others were too busy nipping and tucking all the talent and natural ability out of the game through video analysis. Those teachings showed up in the ’80s, we have theorized on what to do with our body parts and we have examined under a microscope what the leg work of the PGA Tour and LPGA tour players have. We taught “resist with the legs and coil upper body against the lower body” and paid a heavy price both physically and mentally. Then we said “stable lower body,” then finally, just a couple of years ago, we start saying to “let the hips turn” in the backswing.

Well, we have been doing our own thing and blazing a trail for our 115, 000 followers, and because your Human-machine is free of wires and strings, it knows what to do if you give it a clear task. CLARITY IN YOUR TASK will get you the consistency in the movement and it is important for your mind to understand so you know how to let things happen! Enjoy this video on proper leg work in the golf swing and enjoy the practice in your backyard with the easy drills we provide you!

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