Connect with us

Opinion & Analysis

The Wedge Guy: Just who are you guys? (survey results part 1)

Published

on

Again, I want to thank all of you who took the time to participate in the first Wedge Guy/GolfWRX Survey. It was good for me to get a clearer picture of who you are and how you play the game so that I can do my best to be as relevant as possible with my articles. That said, you GolfWRXers do make up a diverse slice of the 25 million golfers in the U.S. (and a larger number counting the rest of the world).

So, let me direct today’s post to giving you some “high level” results from the survey to hold you while I dive into the nitty-gritty of cross-tabulating results to get more granular insights into this demanding audience.

Let’s start with who are you readers? The survey indicates the largest age group is 25-40, with 40 percent of the respondents. The second-largest age group was 41-55, with another 24.5 percent. But nearly 32 percent of you GolfWRXers are over 55. This diversity helps explain many more of the answers about how you play the game.

You represent all areas of the country nearly equally, with 20 percent of you residing outside the U.S.—a true international audience. Over half of you have been playing golf most of your life and only 20 percent have played less than ten years—a very experienced group, for sure.

You all are more proficient at the game than the golfer audience at large, which is reported to average scores of 90 or above. Only 13 percent of GolfWRX readers are in that category. From the survey, 12 percent of you score 75 or better, and another 37 percent 76-81. The largest group of you falls into the 82-90 scoring category. Kudos to you all for having that dedication.
And you are all very active players, with over half of you playing over 40 rounds per year. Only 13.5 percent play less than 20 rounds. That scoring proficiency is likely due to the fact that you tend to be active practice range visitors, with 43 percent saying you practice “Frequently” or “As often as I play”. Only 3.7 percent said they never practice.

In those practice sessions, the most time is spent on iron play, with chipping/ pitching/bunker play ranking just behind it. You spend the least time practicing with your fairways and hybrids, and putting ranked just ahead of driver practice.
It was a bit surprising to me that you seem to not be an overly competitive bunch (at least on the golf course), with 61 percent saying you rarely or never gamble on the golf course, and only 20 percent saying it’s a regular part of playing golf. Likewise, only 21 percent report being active tournament participants, and 24 percent saying they have no interest in tournaments at all. My takeaway is that you play golf for the sheer enjoyment of hitting quality golf shots more often.
So let’s now look at what you said about your equipment.

With regard to your drivers, 43 percent said you’ve played your current gamer less than a year, but 19 percent have played their current driver more than 3 years. You overwhelmingly favor that driver for its accuracy (61 percent) to its distance (37 percent). You were pretty equally divided in your preferred shot pattern between straight (31 percent), fade (26 percent) and draw (28 percent), but 14 percent said you like to be able to work the ball both ways. That was interesting, because 46 percent of you also said you would like to shape your ball flight better, hitting draws and fades more reliably.

Looking at your answers about your iron play rendered some interesting insights, in my opinion. For age of your irons, the answers followed the driver question pretty closely, with 24 percent playing their current irons less than a year, and 34 percent playing them more than 3 years. You are stronger players, with 39 percent reporting that a “comfortable” 6-iron distance is over 175 yards, and another 43 percent saying it was 155-175 yards. Where you would most like to improve your iron play was in distance control (46 percent) and hitting the “in between” shots more reliably (40 percent). Similar to the responses to the driver question, 33 percent said you would like to hit draws and fades more reliably.

Because I’m “The Wedge Guy”, I’m going to reserve diving into the wedge section of the survey until next week, where I can give you a deeper insight into your answers and my analysis of them.

I’ll close the analysis part of today’s article by sharing that your single most desired improvement was hitting more greens (28 percent), followed by hitting more fairways (19 percent) and improving your putting (15 percent). When asked what most determines your overall enjoyment of a round of golf, you ranked “Feeling good about the quality of most of my shots” first, followed closely by “shooting a good score” and “enjoying the people I played with.” Dead last was “winning my bets,” obviously because most of you don’t gamble much or at all.

But let me leave you with this one key thought derived from the survey. The majority said you wanted to control iron distance and hit the in-between-clubs shots better, and that you want to hit more greens and more fairways. Well, all of that comes from a having a controlled swing on your drives and your “typical” or “comfortable” iron shots. For us recreational golfers, that means throttling back the power.

In Ben Hogan’s first book “Power Golf,” he divulged his yardage chart for all his clubs, and while lofts and technology have changed dramatically since then, the key takeaway from this chart was that he listed the “maximum” distance for all his clubs—driver to irons—as 25-35 yards longer than his “regular” distance.

If you don’t have at least 10-15 yards “in reserve” from what you consider your “comfortable” distance with all your clubs, I suggest you learn to throttle back a bit to get there. You will find your accuracy off the tee and distance control with your irons to greatly improve, and you’ll have two options on those in-between shots—either crank up the shorter iron a bit or simply grip down on the longer club. Either one works, and you’ll have the option.

Your Reaction?
  • 94
  • LEGIT10
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP1
  • OB0
  • SHANK4

Terry Koehler is a fourth generation Texan, a native of a small South Texas town and a graduate of Texas A&M University. He has had a most interesting 40-year career in the golf industry. He has created five start-up companies, ranging from advertising agencies to golf equipment companies. You might remember Reid Lockhart, EIDOLON, or SCOR, but you would certainly know his most recent accomplishment: the reintroduction of Ben Hogan to the golf equipment industry in 2015. Terry has been a prolific equipment designer of over 100 putters and several irons, but many know Koehler as simply “The Wedge Guy”, as he authored over 700 articles on his blog by that name from 2003-2010. For almost 25 years, his wedge designs have possibly stimulated other companies to also try to raise the CG and improve wedge performance.

4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. A. Commoner

    Sep 11, 2019 at 2:28 pm

    Perhaps the word tabulate would be more descriptive than the word analysis. I was a bit disappointed. No doubt the author can offer more than this.

  2. BigD

    Sep 11, 2019 at 2:24 pm

    Kdoooooooooooouche, kduoooooooooooche, kduoooooooooooche….

  3. Donkey Face

    Sep 10, 2019 at 5:20 pm

    Matt Kuchar is a big donkey.

Leave a Reply

Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

On Spec

On Spec: The origin stories of popular golf club designs

Published

on

Host Ryan Barath takes a long look back at the lineage of club designs from putters to drivers, and explains why we often see trends repeat themselves. From the eureka moments to modern-day manufacturing techniques that allow for continuous breakthroughs in forgiveness and overall performance. We try and cover it all on the show!

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

Your Reaction?
  • 4
  • LEGIT2
  • WOW1
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP2
  • OB1
  • SHANK3

Continue Reading

Opinion & Analysis

Renee Parsons is….

Published

on

When we started discussing the idea of a PXG series, one of the things I was most curious about was meeting the person that drives the feel of PXG—not the clubs, the feel of the company, the aesthetic, the physical experience, the style…you get it. My assumption was that an introduction to a creative team would be made, but I was dead wrong. The name I was given was one person, Renee Parsons.

Like my article on Bob, I need to say this out loud. Yes, she’s Bob’s wife. Get over it. Yes, they have lots of money. Get over it. Yes, they live in an atmosphere that to most would seem lavish and a bit extreme. Get over it. And yes, it’s probably convenient that Mrs. Parsons is leading the fashion side of PXG. Get over it. Could the Parsons have gone outside of their family walls to find someone else for the job? Probably. The question is why, when the best and most qualified person sits next to Bob 24/7.

It’s a fact, both of them came from very humble beginnings and clawed, scratched and fought their way to the reality they live in now. I’m sure there are those who don’t agree with how they get things done; I’m certain no one at the Parsons residence or PXG as a company is losing sleep over it. I’d love to meet the person who wouldn’t trade places with them. If that person exists please say hi…I’ll wait.

Now that the housekeeping is done…

Having been guest of PXG a few times, I am always overwhelmed by the detail that goes into the whole experience. I mean even the soap is the greatest thing ever. As the schedule started to go out for our shoot I was most excited and nervous for the interview with Renee. It’s the truth. I know Bob well enough at this point, but the Renee conversation is a bit outside my wheelhouse. She is the president of PXG apparel—fashion—something I know very little about. There is also the elephant in the room (that got blown away the moment we met) she’s Mrs. Parsons and anyone with a brain would approach this with a bit of nervousness.

Any caution or nerves I had amassed leading up to the moment of introduction evaporated quickly. As you’ll see in the video, Renee Parsons is a fun, real, tough and measured businesswoman whose ambition rivals Bob’s. After spending time with her, I not only found enhanced respect for what she is endeavoring but also what she has accomplished already.

The PXG brand overall is a culture. It’s big, disruptive, cocky and oh so much fun. It’s not engineered for everyone to like it FYI. It’s very high end, edgy apparel that refuses to stray away from the simple essence that is PXG. The best materials JAM-PACKED into a clean, sleek package.

Like the clubs, the apparel is expensive. $200 sweaters, $300 backpacks, etc. But, like the clubs, you get what you pay for. For a nonfashion eye, I can even attest that the PXG things in my possession hold up as well as anything I have, and even more they are special to me. That’s the thing. It’s special. This is the essence of what Bob, Renee and Team have done.

Like, for instance, Mercedes Benz, PXG has created a brand that part of you might resent because of the cost, but the other part is not only curious but is attracted to what you see. It makes you curious and that is the secret sauce of what Renee is pushing for PXG Apparel. You may see it and have preconceived notions, but damn if you aren’t curious to know more. Then, you get any PXG product in your hands, or walk into the doors of Scottsdale National or PXG HQ….and you know what? You never want to leave.

That’s the biggest takeaway from my time with Renee: I’m excited and curious to see where this goes. If it’s anything like my own personal experience with the things I have been involved in with PXG (like the Scottsdale National Experience that RP had a huge hand in cultivating) it will be big, fun, cocky and leave me wanting more. So, to answer the question, Renee Parsons is…ambitious, and she is going to make the PXG brand bigger than Bob ever dreamed.

Enjoy the video!

 

Your Reaction?
  • 15
  • LEGIT4
  • WOW3
  • LOL3
  • IDHT1
  • FLOP7
  • OB7
  • SHANK57

Continue Reading

Bogey Golf

Bogey Golf: How to plan a golf trip

Published

on

Larry talks with his buddy Pat about their upcoming golf trip to Forest Dunes. They discuss how to plan a trip, what not to do, and take some questions from the audience.

Check out the full podcast on SoundCloud below, or click here to listen on iTunes or here to listen on Spotify.

Want more GolfWRX Radio? Check out our other shows (and the full archives for this show) below. 

Your Reaction?
  • 0
  • LEGIT0
  • WOW0
  • LOL0
  • IDHT0
  • FLOP0
  • OB0
  • SHANK0

Continue Reading

19th Hole

Facebook

Trending