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Titleist 620 irons: Classics refined for the modern player

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Some irons need no introduction.

For decades, the number 600 has been synonymous with classic forgings from Titleist. Blades and cavity backs that have found their way into the bags of the world’s best and golfers looking for the ultimate experience in shotmaking and feel. Be it the 660, 670, 680, 681, or 690, a set of these in a golf bag usually meant one thing—look out!

These timeless designs evoke memories of well-struck shots and golf balls curving in the air at a player’s will. In homage to the legacy of those that have come before, and looking towards the future with refinements for the modern player, Titleist introduces 620 MB and CB irons.

Titleist 620 MB irons

Blades, also known as muscle backs, are the easiest style of clubs to recognize in the game. Whether it be on a shelf in a pro shop or in a Sunday bag next to the practice green, you can spot them in a second. The thing is, when it comes to the 620s from Titleist, you won’t find the initials MB on them anywhere. The reason is beyond simple in its explanation, according to Marni Ines, Director, Titleist Irons Development: “We wanted to bring this blade back to its roots and make it as clean as possible, eliminate any unnecessary markings on the hosel on the back. So we didn’t stamp it with MB. We figure it you’re in the market for a blade you don’t need to be told what one is.” As I said, it almost makes too much sense.

Beyond the stamping, there is more to these irons than initially meets the eye. The 620 series offers improved turf interaction throughout the set thanks to more camber and a tweaked leading edge. I realize this is something often mentioned with new releases, especially with players clubs, but there is a good reason: As modern swings are changing, so are turf conditions. The improved agronomy of modern courses means club soles especially need to be tweaked to offer maximum playability. The sharp leading edges of yesteryear are LONG gone!

In addition to the sole tweaks, there is also less sole to worry about in the short irons. Let me explain: To offer greater control of trajectory and help players “hit their proper windows,” the set has characteristics hidden in each club. The blade length is progressive from the longest iron to the shortest, the transition is so smooth that unless you set clubs next to each other, it’s quite difficult to notice. Every detail of each head was checked, double-checked, and tour validated before getting to this point. The next part of this progression is the face height, which also transitions from more shallow to tall in the pitching wedge. This is where the extra control comes from, especially in the shorter irons with a higher CG.

Titleist has taken everything it has learned from previous MB designs, and with feedback from the best players in the world, created the finest, most controllable, blade it has ever made. It will never be the most forgiving option, but I can’t blame a player of any skill level for wanting to give 620 MB irons a try.

Titleist 620 CB irons

Just like its big brother, the blade, the Titleist 620 CB has gone through a total refinement process to get to where it is today. The sole and profile have similar tweaks to the MB but in an ever-so-fractionally larger package.

Progressive blade length and face height create the same trajectory control, but what makes the CB different is that unlike the blade (or the Titleist T300 iron), it’s not a club found at either end of the spectrum, it’s within it. Data shows that more thanr 80 percent of tour players play some sort of combo set, whether it be blades to CBs, or CBs to unsupported faster-faced irons. What this means is that the CB has to hit this perfect middle ground between transition club and being its own boss.

This is what Titleist has done to complete perfection, not just with the CB but with the clubs around it. Each radius, curve, and transition slots in perfectly with the models on each side of it, this allow you as the player to pick the set the way YOU want, and not be dictated by some unpleasant look from address. The 620 CB is still 100 percent its own unique club, designed for a specific player type, but thanks to some very smart engineering it also gives you more options.

There is more than meets the eye with the long irons of the 620 CB too. Just like the T100s, the 3 and 4-irons of the CB are co-forged with tungsten in the heel and toe to keep the size small but give a serious boost to MOI and launch.

“Our ability to use co-forged high-density tungsten in such a compact blade size like 620 CB is extremely powerful, especially at the long end of the set where players need the most help with launch and forgiveness,” Marni Ines, Director, Titleist Irons Development.

This isn’t the only club in the new Titleist iron line that has gone through this reimagining. The T100 profile has been shrunk compared to the previous AP2 (its most direct club in the previous line) to be the exact same size as the CB to offer greater stability through the ball thanks to embedded tungsten. So, regardless of if you are looking to go full CB or build your own combo set, the 620 irons from Titleist give you the classic look and feel you want—with plenty of performance.

620 MB and 620 CB Specs

STOCK SHAFTS

Steel

620 CB: True Temper Project X LZ: Mid-launch shaft that offers smooth feel, and tour trajectory for those looking to maximize control and have a smoother tempo.

620 MB: True Temper Project X: Low-launch, low-spin shaft that has been a staple on tour and in the bags of some of the world’s top players with faster tempos looking for maximum stability.

Graphite

This is a new one for Titleist. Just like with the original True Temper AMT, they will be the first to offer the Mitsubishi MCA Tensei White AM2 (stands for “ascending mass”).  This new shaft is a low-launch, low-spin option for those wanting a lighter total weight and vibration dampening. The shaft will ascend two grams per club, starting at 108 grams in the PW and going to 94 grams in the 3-iron.

These options are on top of Titleist’s already extremely large selection of available shafts—including options from KBS and Nippon—many of which are available at no additional up-charge.

AVAILABILITY

The new Titleist 620 irons will be available in golf shops worldwide beginning August 30, with fittings beginning August 8.

Steel: MAP $175 per club ($1,399/set of 8)

Graphite: MAP $187.50 per club ($1,499 /set of 8)

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Ryan Barath is a writer & the Digital Content Creation Lead for GolfWRX. He also hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on GolfWRX Radio discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club fitter & master club builder who has more than 16 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop in Hamilton and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. Mike

    Aug 8, 2019 at 8:33 pm

    Finally one with nothing stamped on it, just a clean Blade NICE!

  2. Bobbyg

    Aug 7, 2019 at 1:40 pm

    Makes me miss my 660 blades.

  3. Doesnotno

    Aug 7, 2019 at 8:46 am

    $175 for the MB, made by hitting a black of hot metal with a hammer before grinding and polishing it. The T300 is $125 a piece, with multiple pieces and polymers, and presumably a degree of grinding and polishing.

    What gives? Aren’t blades the cheapest clubs to manufacture any more?

  4. dat

    Aug 6, 2019 at 8:47 pm

    MB yes, CB no.

  5. The dude

    Aug 6, 2019 at 2:12 pm

    MB’s….wow!…now that’s clean (lookout Miz)

  6. Michael Constantine

    Aug 6, 2019 at 9:57 am

    Specs available anywhere?

    • jgpl001

      Aug 8, 2019 at 3:44 am

      Yes, both MB and CB 7 irons are 35 deg and both PW’s are 47 deg – no strong lofts here!

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Whats in the Bag

Justin Thomas’ winning WITB: 2019 BMW Championship

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Driver: Titleist TS3 (9.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana BF 60TX

justin-thomas-witb-driver

3-wood: Titleist TS3 (15 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro Blue 80TX

5-wood: Titleist 915Fd (18 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Motore Speeder VC 9.2 Tour Spec X

Irons: Titleist T100 (4-iron), Titleist 718 MB (5-9)
Shafts: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue X100

Wedges: Vokey Design SM7 (46, 52, 56 degrees), Vokey Design SM6 (60 degrees)
Shaft: True Temper Dynamic Gold Tour Issue S400

Photo via Vokey Wedge Rep Aaron Dill

Putter: Scotty Cameron X5

Grip: SuperStroke Pistol GT Tour

Ball: Titleist Pro V1x

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How @justinthomas34 marks his @titleist Pro V1x ????

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Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Best ball for players with slower swing speeds?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from ghoul31 who created a thread dedicated to finding the ideal golf ball for players with slower swing speeds. Our members have their say on what is the ball most suited to slower swing speeds, with a variety of models receiving a mention.

Here are a few posts from the thread but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Hogan9: “My SS is 80 to 85. I play the Titleist AVX. Many people on these forums tell it’s wrong for me. I’ve tried several brands and types over the last year ( Pro-V-1 and 1X, Cally Supersoft and Chrome Soft, TM TP5X, Wilson Duo Soft and the Snell MTB. The AVX gives me the best overall performance for my game. I’ve had to slightly adjust to how it reacts on chips and pitches, but the extra distance off the tee is well worth it. “
  • North Butte: “Maybe 90mph driver swing on a good day. Driver 205-ish hit 6-iron from 150. Pro V1x but I have played AVX, B330, TP5 with pretty much similar results to my favorite V1x. Also played the Chrome Soft for a while but it seemed to fly a little low and sometimes have trouble holding greens (or maybe I just didn’t give it a long enough chance to know for sure).”
  • Hat Trick: “Pro V1X – Spin and higher launch keeps it in the air longer, but at the same time that spin holds the greens – SS 96-98 mph.”
  • Kmac: “My SS is right around 95-100, and I find the QST to the perfect for my game. I will also play the AVX or Chrome Soft Truvis. But for the money, nothing beats the QST.”

Entire Thread: “Best ball for players with slower swing speeds?”

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Equipment

Forum Thread of the Day: “Single length irons stunting development?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from rbark11 who has sparked an interesting debate over single length irons in our forums. Rbark11 has been playing single length irons for the past seven months, and he is concerned that he may have issues changing back to regular length irons. Our members give their take on the matter, as well as discussing single length irons in general.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • mcs4: “No, it will not. Both my father and I are currently playing Cobra One Length irons after decades of playing variable length irons. It took both of us maybe a few rounds to feel comfortable with the switch. This weekend I played a round with my old irons, and it was different but not a big deal. My opinion is that there are pros and cons with each approach, but I don’t think picking one will make any particular negative impact on your ability to later switch to the other.”
  • Quadra: “I’ve played both. Right now I am back to VL clubs ( Wishon 560 irons). Find VL gives me more shot-making options. With uneven lies, especially with the ball above or below foot level, the shot seems easier with a more upright or flatter lie, rather than trying to manipulate a shot from clubs with only a single length/lie. VL = more shot possibilities.”
  • Aucaveman: “I played Cobra ftbo for a year. Shot my best scores ever. Our club switched to Mizuno exclusively, so I had my first real fitting. I switched to the 919 forged and had to sell the Cobras to fund the mizunos. Really wished I hadn’t. I really liked the Cobras. The shafts in the Mizuno’s are better suited for me but had I put the same shafts in the Cobras; I’d prob been better off. At some point, I’ll prob do it and go back to one lengths. I was perusing eBay yesterday actually.”
  • Brandons68: “I think that the consistency you gain from SL irons is pretty great. I have not played them personally, but have talked to several people that have, and they really like the feel of the irons and the fact that they swing every iron the same because they are all the same length.”

Entire Thread: “Single length irons stunting development?”

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