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Titleist T-Series irons: Ultimate tour performance

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New technology, new name: The Titleist T-Series irons.

The concept behind the T-Series started with one goal: To produce the best performing, most technology packed, playable irons, ever produced by Titleist…simply put: mission accomplished! With the launch of the new T100, T200, and T300s, Titleist is ushering in a new era of forgiveness, speed, and control with Max Impact.

What does that mean? Before diving into Max Impact, let’s start with the control part. With the launch of the new T-Series, Titleist is reminding golfers that fitting is the key to maximizing your set. From wedges to woods, each club should serve a distinct purpose and earn its spot in your bag—never carry a club because you “think” you need it, carry the clubs you know you will use.

Titleist calls this is the 3D Fitting Process

  • Distance
  • Dispersion
  • Descent

Focusing on these factors ensures each iron in your bag is creating the proper parameters to improve scoring. Statistics prove that the closer you hit it to your target (descent and dispersion) the likelihood of getting the next shot closer (or in the hole) goes way up—it’s the strokes gained principle pioneered by Mark Broadie. Each iron in the T-Series has been designed to blend with the other models including the 620 series blades and CBs to make sure regardless of your final set make up it transitions on both looks and performance. With the new T-Series, the larger the number model 100, 200, 300, the faster the ball speeds and the higher the launch. Add the all-new Max Impact Technology, and you have three distinct iron sets designed to help any player find the performance they are looking for.

Titleist T100 irons

Built from the ground up with direct input from Titleist’s PGA Tour staff, the mission statement from the design team for the new T100 was to simply create the best performing tour iron ever—NOT “the best AP2.” With a shape that is distinctly Titleist but completely redefined as far as offset, top line, sole width, camber, and blade length, the T100 gives players looking for a tour performance iron more playability than ever before.

Co-forged with large amounts of tungsten (66g on average in the 3-7 irons) in the heel and toe, the T100 looks a lot more like a single-piece forged players cavity back than multi-piece forgiveness monster, but looks can be deceiving. It has the thinnest face they have ever built into a true forged players club, which allows designers to push more mass around the head and create greater ball speed, which is a never a bad thing especially when you consider that it still has a fully supported face.

Just like with club technology, turf conditions are always evolving with new grass types and mower techniques. This means where the club contacts the ground has to evolve too, which is exactly what has happened to the whole T-Series including the T100. Sole width and profiles have been reduced to offer more camber and radius, which through the testing process has lead players to say the same thing over and over: “they feel faster through the turf.” That’s from Marni Ines, Director, Titleist Irons Development. It’s not that they actually go through that much faster but they react through the ground much more efficiently, which means as course conditions vary, whether through the season or thanks to traveling, you are going to great results shot after shot.

(Club fitter thought break for a moment)

I can’t reiterate this enough: In the world of designing golf clubs, the rules set forth by the governing bodies along with mass totals for club heads will always create a unique challenge for engineers. Every single gram saved is valuable in creating higher MOI, better COG placement, and optimizing ball speed. Tweaks that might appear to be small can actually make a big difference for some players, for example; a simple change in sole shape. What we are seeing is the practice of marginal gains, which can be summed up by this practical application: rather than attempt to improve one thing by 10 percent, improve 10 things by 1 percent to equal better results. Now take it further and imagine if you improve 10 measurable factors by 1.5 percent, these are tangible numbers for increased performance.

So why do I bring this up? It’s because this is how engineers work to help you play better golf. All these small changes compounded together make for big improvements to your golf game. It’s about using every technology available in both production and design to create improvement. If you can change three parameters to get angle of decent two percent higher from 43 degrees to 45 degrees that’s greater stopping power to help you get closer to flags, equaling the potential to score better. Something we all want to do.

Speaking to technology jumps, this bring us to…

MAX Impact

Max Impact is a combination of technologies that pairs the thinnest faces Titleist has ever produced with structural support and polymer core behind the geometric center of the face to increase speed, launch, and improve feel.

So about the supporting polymer: It’s not some run of the mill, “Hey that sound like a good idea,” piece of just anything. If there is one thing Titleist knows beyond how to make the number one irons on tour, it’s polymers. With help from the golf ball R&D Team, the Titleist Iron engineers went through a multitude of options before settling on the what was the final variation based on density, rebound properties and finally acoustic enhancement. As they explained,

“Think of the unsupported face like a trampoline, pulled tight with a huge potential for rebound. Now take that trampoline and put an exercise ball underneath it right in the middle. You’re going to bounce higher and increase the rebound not only in the middle but also when you don’t catch the middle of the trampoline – That’s the application of the Max Impact.”

So what do we do about all of this speed? The one thing players often talk about is the inconsistency in distance they see from irons with unsupported faces (“hotspots”) that occur on shots hit around the face. During my discussion with the engineering team, I asked if these “hotspots” still really exist on modern irons and to my surprise I was told in one way or the other “YES…BUT.” These shots that go further don’t actually come from the face being hotter in one area, they come from gear effect from shots usually hit high on the face above the center of percussion…

Center of percussion? Let’s explain that before going any further (Thanks Harvard Natural Sciences Lecture) “The center of percussion (COP) is the place on a bat, racket, or golf club where it may be struck without causing reaction at the point of support. When a ball is hit at this spot, the contact feels good and the ball seems to spring away with its greatest speed and therefore this is often referred to as the sweet spot.”

Just like with a driver, shots hit above that area will launch higher with less spin—that creates parameters for shots to go further. But if you can prevent that from happening or shrink that area, the likelihood of those shots occurring goes WAY down and you get a much more consistent ball flight. That’s part of the genius of Max Impact, not only does it help create greater speed but creates more consistent speed and launch conditions all over the face. Everything you want in an iron built for speed in a players package.

Titleist T200 irons

The first thing you’ll notice that makes the T200 unique from any Titleist iron before it is Max Impact Technology. I realize this sounds very different from any Titleist iron before it and…well…that’s because it is.

Thanks to new materials and manufacturing techniques, along with lessons learned through the introduction of the Concept Series and Speed Project, the T200 has an unsupported (by metal) Forged L-Face that not only feels great but flexes for more ball speed. Thanks to the weight savings of the thinner Forged L-face, more tungsten (average of 90g from the 4-7-irons) can be placed low and on the perimeter of the club to increase forgiveness and overall total stability where players need it.

That’s part of the reason stronger lofts are required—these things really do LAUNCH. Max Impact isn’t found in every T200 though, it has been placed in the 4- 7 irons because Titleist player testing and data crunching proved time after time that as players get away from their scoring clubs distance gapping and dispersion becomes an issue. This is where the 3D fitting process makes sure every club in the set has a purpose and hits a proper flight and distance.

Titleist T300 irons

If you just look at the spec for the T300, I already know what you’re going to say “WOW, these lofts are jacked, no wonder they go so far.” That’s not the full story, and at this point in golf technology, I’m completely over hearing that as an excuse for players to NOT trying a club. This comes from the perspective of a fitter rather than a player—not the other way around.

The T300 is the hottest and most forgiving Titleist iron ever made. Just like its smaller brother, the T200, it uses the same Max Impact Technology to both add rebound and improve overall feel. The unsupported face is stretched across a larger area thanks to the bigger face size, wider sole, and undercut perimeter to push the COG low and away from the face—if the T200 launches, then the T300 REALLY Launches! This deep COG and thin fast face is what makes this club launch so high, it’s also the reason stronger lofts are necessary. If it wasn’t for strong lofts, then with the speed and spin they would create at “standard” lofts, ball flight would end up uncontrollable. Basically the exact opposite of what you want in an iron.

Part of how they were able to make the T300 the most forgiving Titleist iron ever is by actually eliminating a part of the club that was beneficial in previous models (like the AP1)—hollow-body construction. Even with a hollow-body design, there is unnecessary weight placed high along the back of the club.

Generally for many designs this is fine because the wall thickness is minimal, and thanks to smarter people than me, this allows for more flexing of the body of the club to enhance ball speeds. But if given the option between the two, a fully undercut iron would have a higher MOI and help create that same trampoline when engineered properly and free up more discretionary mass. For the T300, Max Impact is found in the 4-7 irons to again help with launch and speed and create proper set gapping.

Stock Shafts & Availability

Titleist has one of the largest available shaft matrices available through custom order, but the stock shafts for each model are as follows.

Steel

T100 – True Temper AMT Tour White AMT White
T200- True Temper AMT Black AMT Black
T300- True Temper AMT Red AMT Red

Graphite

This is a new one for Titleist. Just like with the original True Temper AMT, they will be the first to offer the Mitsubishi MCA Tensei AM2 (stands for ascending mass) shafts that will come in  versions White, Blue, & Red.

T100 – Mitsubishi MCA Tensei White AM2 | Low launch, low spin | 94-108g (2g per club)
T200- Mitsubishi MCA Tensei Blue AM2 | Mid launch, mid spin | 74-88g (2g per club)
T300- Mitsubishi MCA Tensei Red AM2 | High launch, mid-high spin | 54-68g (2g per club)

T-SERIES AVAILABILITY: New Titleist T-Series irons will be available in golf shops worldwide beginning Aug. 30, with fittings beginning Aug. 8. With Pricing of the T100 and 200 set at $175 per club with steel ($1,399/set of 8) and $187.50 per club ($1,499 /set of 8) graphite

T300 will be $125 per club ($999/set of 8) Steel & $137.50 per club ($1,099/set of 8) graphite

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Ryan Barath is part of the Digital Content Creation Team for GolfWRX. He hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on the GolfWRX Radio Network which focuses on discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

23 Comments

23 Comments

  1. B LANEY

    Aug 19, 2019 at 4:24 pm

    Do you guys have an editor? If not, please hire one. The spelling and grammar errors across the site are sloppy very unprofessional.

  2. bill

    Aug 19, 2019 at 3:20 pm

    whats the offset?

  3. Nate

    Aug 19, 2019 at 2:06 pm

    You negate the question, but then don’t answer it – WHY does Titleist use these ridiculous loft angles!? PSA to anyone at Titleist – I was actually getting into the idea of getting these T200s, but when I see these loft angles, I just think that you guys are trying to fool us into thinking our X iron goes further than the competition and that makes me really not want to get these. Is there a reasonable explanation why??

  4. Aztec

    Aug 17, 2019 at 1:55 am

    These are UGLY…

  5. s

    Aug 8, 2019 at 5:10 pm

    Now that PW is a 150yd club, we will need to buy 5-6 Vokey wedges to fill the gap. Way to go, Titleist!

  6. Pelling

    Aug 8, 2019 at 6:31 am

    Junk.

    • Bing Hogan

      Aug 8, 2019 at 10:20 am

      Yep, and embarrassing to have in the bag.

  7. Bobby

    Aug 7, 2019 at 8:32 pm

    The T300 will be in my bag ASAP. AP1s were great. If these are better, sign me up.

  8. Bing Hogan

    Aug 7, 2019 at 9:43 am

    Time to have a PW distance contest

  9. Robstercsi

    Aug 7, 2019 at 5:16 am

    See you’ve changed the spelling of ‘descent’ now – no thanks needed, and best wishes, Rob

  10. Mark

    Aug 7, 2019 at 2:05 am

    Dear Mr. Barath,

    I have an interest in golf club technology but possess limited knowledge. Given your extensive knowledge, please would you be so kind as to explain what the terms “tour performance” and “tour iron” mean.

    Yours appreciatively,

    Mark B.

  11. Kansaslefty

    Aug 7, 2019 at 12:25 am

    No thanks

  12. Spyy

    Aug 6, 2019 at 11:03 pm

    One ugly set of irons, a huge glob stuck in cavity’s…….pitiful loony

  13. Chuckies In love

    Aug 6, 2019 at 10:41 pm

    Oh look!! Fashion irons, the penny loafer and tie bar on a stick!

  14. Brent

    Aug 6, 2019 at 10:38 pm

    I’d be interested in AP1 irons this fall, but not the new T300s. Ryan, any idea if both sets will be available for custom orders for a few more months, or only the new irons?

  15. DJ

    Aug 6, 2019 at 8:54 pm

    I want the T300 11* one iron

  16. dat

    Aug 6, 2019 at 8:47 pm

    Hideous

  17. Curt

    Aug 6, 2019 at 8:29 pm

    Cool clubs. To much technology. Should be banned on tour. I’ll never understand why pros are so spoiled. Be like the MLB finally allowing metal bats. Just making the sport easier and easier every day. Personally do not believe modern pros are any better and every record breaker needs an asterisk *****.

  18. Scott

    Aug 6, 2019 at 5:57 pm

    Mizuno MP 20 release is 9/5

  19. Cc Shop

    Aug 6, 2019 at 5:04 pm

    Much better look in person. Plus I couldn’t argue with results. Current 718 Ap2 are two degrees strong loft and I was getting nearly identical distance and spin numbers out of the T100 at its stock loft. If your an AP2 player give the New CB a strong look. A little higher spin for me but feel and forgiveness was outstanding.

  20. JCGolf

    Aug 6, 2019 at 2:15 pm

    Changing descent angle from 43 degrees to 45 degrees is a 4.6% difference. Not a 2% difference.

  21. BettiBoop

    Aug 6, 2019 at 1:50 pm

    Those have to be the ugliest irons I’ve seen in a long time. All of them are just plain ugly.

  22. duke

    Aug 6, 2019 at 11:39 am

    Beautiful clubs and T100 for me. Wow 43* PW. OEM’s are on a “pw loft” competition.

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Whats in the Bag

Rory McIlroy WITB (2020 ZOZO Championship)

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Driver: TaylorMade SIM (10.5 @8 degrees)
Shaft: Fujikura Ventus Black 6X (45.5 inches, 59.25 lie, D4)

rory-mcilroy-witb-2020

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM Titanium (15 @13.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro White 80 TX (43.25 inches, 58 lie, D4)

5-wood: TaylorMade SIM Max (19 @ 18.25 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro White 90 TX

Irons: TaylorMade P7MB (3-PW)
Shaft: Project X Rifle 7.0 (6.5 in PW) 

Wedges: TaylorMade MG2 (54-10SB, 60-08LB)
Shaft: Project X Rifle 6.5

rory-mcilroy-witb-2020

Putter: TaylorMade Spider X Copper (34.25, 2.5 loft, 70 lie)

Ball: 2019 TaylorMade TP5 (#22)

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord (58R 1+1, logo down)

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GolfWRX Spotted: 2021 Mizuno ST-Z and ST-X drivers on USGA Conforming List

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When it comes to drivers, Mizuno isn’t usually the company that comes to the top of mind for many golfers, but starting with the ST-190, and then the ST-200 series in 2020, they have quickly changed the perception of their metal woods thanks to wins on tour and more players choosing to put them in play—most recently Brandt Snedeker as a non-contracted player.

This morning, with the update of the USGA and R&A conforming equipment lists, we are getting a sneak peek at what Mizuno will have in store for 2021 with the release of the ST-Z and ST-X drivers.

What we know

Based on the information provided in the USGA submission by Mizuno, the ST-X will only be available in right-handed (10.5 and 12-degree lofts), while the ST-Z will be available in both right (9.5  and 10.5 degrees) and left-handed (9.5 degrees only).

ST-Z

Based on the images from the USGA list and our experience with the Mizuno product line, it appears that the ST-Z is the next step in the evolution of the standard ST200 with no adjustable CG but with a customizable weight in the back of the head.

We haven’t seen any images of a moveable weight driver in this new ST series, so it could be that the G-woods are getting phased out in favor of more internally biased weighting, but since those types of drivers often take a bit more time to get just right, it could be a matter of time before a “G” type driver hits the list.

As for technology, it has Mizuno’s standard wave to create flexibility behind the face, an adjustable hosel, and based on the images, more carbon fiber used around the head compared to previous generations, especially on the sole. I would also expect to hear a new face material or design story to complete the package and to boost MOI and ball speed.

ST-X

Based on the image from the USGA list and our experience, it appears that the ST-X is the next step in the evolution of the ST200-X driver, which is the lighter weight, more upright, and draw-biased driver from Mizuno. Don’t think draw bias always means it’s for higher handicaps either, because Mizuno staff player Chris Kirk got along very nicely with his out on the Korn Ferry and PGA Tours in 2020, including a win.

The tell-tale sign is the more heel biased weight in the back of the driver and what looks to be some sort of textured area to create “visible technology” towards the heel of the clubhead.

Beyond being draw-biased, when it comes to technology, it shares a lot of similarities to the ST-Z with Mizuno’s standing wave to create flexibility behind the face, an adjustable hosel, and more carbon fiber used around the head compared to previous generations, especially on the sole, and in the case of the ST-X, on the sole.

We don’t have any information on the release of these new drivers, but considering Mizuno didn’t adjust product release schedules in 2020, I would imagine it will be doing the same in 2021, and we can expect to hear more about these ST drivers either late 2020 or early into 2021.

To see what other golfers are saying about the newly spotted Mizuno ST-Z and ST-X drivers, check out the GolfWRX forums and join the discussion: GolfWRX – New Mizuno drivers spotted on USGA Conforming List

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Equipment

5 hybrid vs 5 iron – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing the logic behind removing their 5 iron from their bag. WRXer ‘rwl’ asks whether any fellow members have experiences doing so, and WRXers have been sharing their thoughts and experiences in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • RobertL.: “I replaced my 5 iron with a 5 hybrid. I find it far easier to hit than my 5 iron. I also took my 6 iron out of the bag, so now my longest iron is a 7. I now carry a 3, 4, and 5 hybrid since they’re so much easier to hit than long irons. Makes a big difference for this senior golfer.”
  • JohnKHawk: “For last 2 seasons I’ve played with a Cobra F9 5 hybrid. It’s 24 degrees & gaps perfectly between Cobra OS 3-4 hybrid at 20.5 degrees & Apex19 6 iron which is 26.5 degrees. The 5 iron was just getting to be to undependable. Misses with the 5 hybrid were more playable than the 5 iron. Use what works best for your game.”
  • Abe21599: “Never a bad idea to have both a 5i and 5h options in the trunk, just gotta watch lofts.”
  • nitram: “I know it sounds so “old man” but if you want to make a change in your 5-iron slot and can’t seem to get along with a hybrid, give the 9-wood a try. You may be pleasantly surprised.”

Entire Thread: “5 hybrid vs 5 iron”

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