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Titleist TS Hybrids: Score from everywhere!

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What happens when you take the most played hybrids on tour and make them better?

You get the TS hybrids from Titleist.

Born from the same Titleist Speed project as the TS metal woods (which have won multiple equipment counts on the PGA Tour this year), the all-new Titleist TS hybrids bring more forgiveness and speed to two distinct designs: the TS2 and TS3.

Hybrids are a unique animal: They’ve been around for a long time yet and some people still refuse to give them a shot (Titleist has you covered with the U500 series U500 Series). Some people look at them as more accurate versions of fairway woods, while others think long-iron replacement. Regardless of how you view them, you’re right! They fill a spot in your bag for a specific yardage, and like any club, they are designed to maximize performance.

Most fitters would say hybrids are more a part of an iron set than woods although they share a lot of the same technology. Instead of trying to maximize “distance,” the role of a hybrid is more similar to that of a wedge—a scoring club, and that’s how Titleist believes you should look at them too. Proximity to hole is one of the most important parts of the game to shoot lower scores—strokes gained statistics prove that. Regardless of the club you are hitting, if you hit it closer and stop it sooner, you’ll see lower numbers on your scorecard. That’s what the TS hybrids are designed for.

Titleist Speed technology to score

Stephanie Luttrell, Director of Metal woods Development, Titleist Golf Club R&D

“By taking everything we learned in developing TS drivers and fairways and implementing those technologies into our hybrid platform, we’ve been able to improve our speed and distance performance while maintaining the incredible playability that makes these hybrids scoring clubs – that easy, consistent distance that launches high and lands soft, closer to the hole.”

The first thing many will notice about both of the new models is no more ARC (Active Recoil Channel) in the sole. Why? because they don’t need it anymore, or as Principal Development Engineer Tom Bennett said: We engineered it obsolete!”

Speed comes from the face, and the faces of both the TS2 and TS3 hybrids are 16 percent thinner than previous 818 models. That 16 percent reduction in thickness means a substantial reduction in weight and greater flex across more area—the end result is more consistent ball speed across the face.

As I have said many times, golf club engineers work within a tight structure for the mass of each club, depending on what they are designing, a few grams here or there can mean the difference between compromising on something to create desired results and not having to compromise at all. By utilizing the latest technologies and materials there is no compromising—just optimizing.

The Speed Chassis helps save weight all over the club including the crown. This, in turn, allows for a lower COG and better mass positioning—end result being a 10 percent bump in MOI, higher launch, and lower spin. Lower spin might not seem like something you would want from a hybrid, BUT let me explain: ball speed equals lift and spin. Lift is good because it means a ball will elevate quickly (something you’re gonna want from a longer shot) but when spin gets too high, you can lose directional control in either windy conditions or on mishits. By creating the opportunity for players to launch it higher with less spin and more speed you create conditions for a more desirable and controllable trajectory. Control is a very good thing!

The Titleist TS2 hybrid

The TS2 was born from the idea of taking a well loved shape ( we’ll get to that shape in a bit ) and creating a hybrid for players that prefer the rounded larger shape of a metal wood. The TS2 hits the perfect balance between maximizing forgiveness and still offering complete playability for players with a more sweeping / shallow delivery into the ball. It has a lower further back COG to create higher launch conditions for those who need it.

So about shape. The TS2 might remind you of a club you have seen before: the 910H—well it’s no coincidence. When I pointed out this similarity to Tom Bennett, he had a great explanation. To paraphrase “hybrids are clubs people don’t switch too often, once a player has a good one and knows how it plays, it’s hard to replace it. Using extensive player feedback and looking at what older models people were bringing to TPI (Titleist Performance Institute), the 910 kept popping up as a favorite. When players prefer a shape it’s our responsibility as designers to refine it, make it better and pack as much technology and performance as possible. That’s how we created the TS2.”

The refinements are easy to spot: a much sleeker sole for better turf interaction, pleasing pear shape, and a sloped crown all improve performance—and that’s just on the outside. Plus, we can’t forget the tour-proven SureFit hosel to dial in exact lofts and yardages. With everything we already talked about going on inside the TS2, these are going to be big winners for a lot of players.

The Titleist TS3 hybrid

The TS3 is a different story. Designed to maximize speed and workability for players that hit more down on the ball, the shape is shorter front to back, taller in face height, and it has a more squared toe. Not only that, but the TS3 uses the adjustable Magnetic SureFit CG to further optimize shot shape for players seeking preferred trajectories—and that’s on top of the already proven SureFit adjustable hosel.

From address, you can see that along with the square shape there is a touch of offset from the hosel to the face to give it a look preferred by players looking for a true iron replacement. This also moves the shaft axis closer to the COG of the head, another way to increase workability without sacrificing MOI. There was even extensive player testing to determine what the grooves should look like and their length on the face, proving that no detail too small for Titleist designers. It all makes sense though when you are designing the number one hybrid on tour.

Specs & availability

Lofts for the TS 2 are: 17° (RH Only), 19°, 21°, 23°, 25°, 27°

Lofts for the TS3 are: 19°, 21°, 23°, 25°.

Just like the TS Series metal wood, the Titleist TS hybrids come with a huge variety of stock options to fit almost any players need, in addition to their industry-leading custom shaft options

  • KURO KAGE Dual Core Black 60 (High launch and moderate spin)
  • TENSEI AV Series Blue 70 (Mid launch and spin)
  • HZRDUS Smoke Black 80 (Low/mid launch and spin)
  • Even Flow T1100 White 90 (Low launch and spin)

The price for both the TS2 and TS3 hybrids is $279 and they will be available in golf shops around the world starting Aug 30th.

 

 

 

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Ryan Barath is a writer & the Digital Content Creation Lead for GolfWRX. He also hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on GolfWRX Radio discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club fitter & master club builder who has more than 16 years experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour professionals. He studied business and marketing at the Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop in Hamilton and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers, including True Temper. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, from course architecture to physics, and share his passion for club building, and wedge grinding.

1 Comment

1 Comment

  1. Ross

    Jul 31, 2019 at 2:23 am

    TS2 Looks great and can’t wait to test it against my 818 H1 that I put in the bag a few months ago. First time ever having a hybrid in my bag and it quickly became one of my favorite clubs. So versatile. Should have gotten onboard with the hybrid long ago. Fills so many gaps. Thought the H2 looked a lot better than the shape of the TS3 so it’ll be interesting to see how that’s received and how people get along with it. Props to Titleist for stepping up their game across the board with their clubs this past year.

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Thorbjorn Olesen pleads not guilty to sexual assault; will face trial next month

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On Wednesday, Thorbjorn Olesen indicated that he would plead not guilty to the charges of sexual assault, being drunk on an aircraft, and assault by beating, and he will now face trial in September.

Sky Sports broke the news that the Dane appeared at Uxbridge Magistrates’ Court on Wednesday where he confirmed his name, address, date of birth and nationality as well as his not guilty plea, and he has since been released on unconditional bail.

Olesen will now face trial at Isleworth Crown Court on 18th September which is the day before the European Tour’s Flagship event – the BMW Championship at Wentworth.

The 29-year-old was arrested on 29th July at Heathrow Airport and released upon investigation after being accused of sexually assaulting a woman and urinating in the aisle of a first-class cabin.

Olesen is currently suspended from the European Tour while the case is ongoing.

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PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan stresses that the Tour won’t be “overly reactionary” in attempts to solve slow play issue

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Days after the European Tour announced their 4-point plan to tackle slow play in the game, PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan has stated that the Tour will not be reactionary to their counterparts across the Atlantic Ocean.

According to USA Today, Monahan spoke to media at East Lake Golf Club on Tuesday and acknowledged the ire of golf fans around the world. But the commissioner stressed that while the Tour is currently in the process of combating the issue—there is no quick fix.

“We’ve been working on this, and we can be criticized for taking too long. But there’s been more than 1.2 million shots hit this year, and we’re talking about a few instances – and granted, they’re instances that are extreme – and we’re going to go down a path and we’re going to address that.

And I feel really good about where we’re going to get to, but it takes longer than you want, and you can’t be overly reactionary. I tend to have a fair amount of urgency around everything I do, and sometimes you can’t execute the urgency you want. You have to stay on the path you’re on.”

Per the report, PGA Tour officials have held numerous meetings with the Player Advisory Council and the Policy Board and one rule change which we know will be coming into effect for the 2020 season is that only the top-65 and ties instead of the top-70 and ties will play the weekend next season. While teams in Florida have also reportedly been analyzing ShotLink data going back to 2003 to identify trends and solutions to solve the issue plaguing the sport.

But while the European Tour have gone about things their own way, Monahan says that their new ideas will not influence the PGA Tour’s future decision making on the situation in any way.

“I wouldn’t say we’re going to be influenced in any way. I think everybody looking at this, talking about it is a good thing, and they’ve obviously decided that that’s the right thing for the European Tour. And when we’re ready to talk about what we’re going to do, I’ll be excited to talk to all of you about it.”

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Morning 9: PGA Tour commish wants to slow down slow play discussion | Greg Norman: Roll back the ball | Langston

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By Ben Alberstadt (ben.alberstadt@golfwrx.com; @benalberstadt on Instagram)

August 21, 2019

Good Wednesday morning, golf fans.
1. Let’s slow down the slow play discussion
Golfweek’s Steve DiMeglio…”Monahan, in a gathering with members of the media Tuesday morning at East Lake Golf Club, said the Tour is on the right path toward resolving any issues regarding pace of play.”
  • “He feels everyone’s pain, he has seen the ire on social media and heard from the mouths of top players after recent episodes of excruciatingly dawdling play. He’s just not going to lead a sprint to any resolutions.”
  • “We’ve been working on this, and we can be criticized for taking too long,” Monahan said to a few chuckles from the listeners.
  • “But there’s been more than 1.2 million shots hit this year, and we’re talking about a few instances – and granted, they’re instances that are extreme – and we’re going to go down a path and we’re going to address that,” he added. “And I feel really good about where we’re going to get to, but it takes longer than you want, and you can’t be overly reactionary.”
  • “I tend to have a fair amount of urgency around everything I do, and sometimes you can’t execute the urgency you want. You have to stay on the path you’re on.”

Full piece.

2. Greg Norman: roll it back to pre 96!

 

(h/t to Geoff Shackelford for the spot & Golf.com)
3. No risk, plenty of reward
Will players going to approach East Lake differently owing to the staggered scoring?
PGATour.com’s Sean Martin…”There’s nothing to lose, and everything to gain. The only question is how to make up those strokes.”
  • “Don’t expect drastically different gameplans, especially in the early rounds, though. East Lake isn’t a course that offers a lot of risk-reward opportunities. Instead, it’s a straightforward layout that rewards repetitive execution.  Plodding along with pars and taking advantage of the occasional birdie opportunity is the best way to succeed here. Professional golfers are a conservative bunch by nature, and they aren’t convinced that slamming on the gas pedal for 72 holes is the best strategy at the season finale.”
  • “I don’t think I’m really going to change my game plan too much,” Conners said. “I’m going to try to make a lot of birdies. Starting in this position, there’s really nothing to lose. You can’t be silly, but if I can put four really good rounds of golf together, I have a chance. I think everyone feels like they have a chance.”
  • “Since 1983, there have been 19 victories by players who trailed by 10 or more strokes after any round. Nine players won when trailing by 10 or more strokes with 54 holes remaining, while seven players did so with two rounds left to play.”

Full piece.

4. Inkster losing sleep
Golf Channel’s Randall Mell…”Juli Inkster joked that making her two U.S. Solheim Cup captain’s picks are so difficult this year, she wished she didn’t have any picks at all, but the truth is that she would like more.”
  • “Inkster said Tuesday at the CP Women’s Open that she wished she had three picks.”
  • “Two picks don’t really do much for me,” Inkster said. “If I had four picks, it would be great, but I do think we need one more pick in there.”
  • “Inkster’s automatic qualifiers will be determined with Sunday’s finish to the CP Women’s Open. She’ll announce her two captain’s picks on Monday. European captain Catriona Matthew made her four captain’s picks last week. Inkster said another pick would help her with pairings.”

 

5. Well done, Lucas!
Golf Channel’s Rex Hoggard on Lucas Glover’s return to the Tour Championship
  • “For the three-time Tour winner, rock bottom came in 2015 when he was forced to play the Korn Ferry Tour’s finals events to regain his status.”
  • “That was a pretty bad year,” Glover said on Tuesday at East Lake. “I didn’t do anything very well. That was about as low as it got, that first journey back to the Korn Ferry finals.”
  • “By comparison this season has been an unqualified success. He’s made 20 of 25 cuts, posted seven top-10 finishes and heated up at the perfect moment with a tie for seventh last week at the BMW Championship to qualify for East Lake for the first time since 2009.”

Full piece.

6. The forgotten history of Langston
Elliot Williams at The Washingtonian…”In 1927, golfers petitioned Uncle Sam to build a course for African Americans. While they eventually prevailed, the replacement wasn’t much of an upgrade. Located atop an abandoned city dump in Northeast DC, Langston-named after John Mercer Langston, Howard University’s first law school dean and the first black man from Virginia elected to Congress-opened in 1939 with grass missing and just nine holes. (The other nine were added in 1955.) There were no shelters for bad weather, and the course was surrounded by disused tires and a sewage ditch. Trash and all, though, Langston was still home.”
  • “Over the years, it also became a see-and-be-seen destination. Heavyweight champion Joe Louis played an amateur tournament at Langston in 1940, drawing 2,000 fans. Lifelong golfer David Ross met Muhammad Ali one day on a putting green: “His limousine pulls up, and . . . he said to me, ‘I’ve never picked up a golf club before,’ and he reached out and got my putter.”
  • “By the 1970s, black people could comfortably play at many courses. As the demographics of the city changed around it, Langston did, too. Today newcomers-often white and in their twenties-play just as often as the old-timers. The course, however, is again in shambles. The National Park Service says it will open up operations to bidders this year and will strike a new contract by October 2020. But a similar plan to renovate was under way two years ago and ended abruptly. Longtimers hope the limbo will soon be in the past-and that after 80-some years, the course conditions will finally befit its loyal players.”

Full piece. 

7. Bobby’s missing medal
A segment of a fascinating story from Helen Ross at PGATour.com
  • …”The medal, which is slightly larger than a silver dollar, is the one Jones received when he won the 1927 Southern Open. On the front is the crest of the Southern Golf Association while the back is engraved in 14-carat gold with the words: Open Championship, Atlanta, March 1927, Won by Robert T. Jones Jr., 281 strokes.”
  • “What the younger Jones didn’t know is that serious golf collectors had wondered where it was ever since his grandfather donated all his championship medals to the United States Golf Association. The medal was the only first-place award not in the collection.”
  • “One day, Jones and his wife, Mimi, who happened to be wearing the medal, walked into a reception. A good friend, Sidney Matthew, the Tallahassee, Florida lawyer who is one of the foremost experts on all things Bobby Jones, immediately took notice.”

Full piece. 

8. A Tiger-inspired generation
Golf Channel’s Will Gray…“The world that Woods took by storm two decades ago is far different from the one he looked to reconquer last year, and different still from the one that watched him slip into a green jacket this spring. Gone are the scores of journeymen who once cobbled out a decent living on Tour without much time for practice. Same for the single-skill specialists, the ones who shined so brightly in one area as to make up for glaring deficiencies elsewhere.”
  • “This is the Tiger Effect. The one he bore and the one he’s had to overcome.”
  • “Out on Tour in 2019, you need to have the entire package. Fairways are lined not with players who spend more time at the buffet table than the gym, but instead by physical specimen who have honed their craft by combining two workouts for every round played. The era of Brooks Koepka, Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy is upon us, with athletes taking to golf rather than golfers gleaning athletic skills to boost their skill set.”

Full piece.

9. Youngest CWO competitor ever
BBC report on 12-year-old Michelle Liu…”As well as practicing alongside LPGA players, Liu met Henderson, 21, on the driving range on Monday and said she had a picture taken with the defending champion, who became the first home winner last year.”
  • “Liu qualified for the event, which started in 1973, via the Canadian Women’s Amateur Championship in July.”
  • “I know there is a lot of great players in the field here so I definitely say it’s going to be pretty hard,” she added.

 

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