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What separates your good rounds from your bad ones?

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I have had the privilege of working with some of the best golfers in the world, including those that have won major championships. Before I teach them my Fluid Motion Factor program, I have this kind of conversation with them.

Let’s say this player just had the best ball-striking day he has had in the past six months and someone comes up to him after the round and asks him why he hit the ball so well today. Could he answer, on a fundamental level, why he played so well?

If I ask them enough questions, eventually they say they are too sure. Everything just clicked. The swing felt great.

And then I ask this same player that if he went out the next day and had a poor ball-striking day and someone walked up to him and asked him why he played so poorly, could he answer, on a fundamental level why he played so poorly. He would probably say he was not sure, because he thought he was doing the same thing he did yesterday but had the opposite results.

So we have some of the best ball strikers in the world and they are not too sure what happens when they play well and not too sure what happens when they didn’t play well. Could there be anything more wrong with this picture?

Well, fortunately, there is an answer to why accomplished golfers swing well one day and poorly the next. It is not my answer; it is nature’s answer. Golf is about motion, motion is about the muscles, so one has to look at the operating system of the muscles to understand why a swing is synced correctly one day and not the next.

We are not talking about sports psychology here. We are dialing down to the motherboard of the swing; the processes in the mind that are responsible for timing, for making adjustments in the swing, for ball control, for literally everything.

This is probably an arena you are not familiar with, but it should be an arena you should be very familiar with as it controls every element of the swing.

All the information I about to tell you comes from Dr. Fred Travis, a world-renowned neuroscientist that has worked with two Olympic teams and written numerous books on the brain and zone experiences.

In order to generate motion, any motion, you have to generate an intention, a signal in the brain. There are two parts of the brain I will talk about here; the prefrontal cortex, (the discriminating intellect, also called the CEO of the brain) and the motor system. When someone generates a fluid, well-timed swing, the signal bypasses the PFC and goes directly to the motor system. It is the motor system that communicates with the body to produce motion.

The problem occurs and it is a major problem, especially if you are a professional golfer when the PFC intercepts that signal and delays it in getting to the motor system. Then during the swing, the body is looking for direction from the mind, there are too many processes going on and that is when the bulkier, core muscles tend to dominate the motion.

This good process, when the PFC does not interfere with the signal and goes straight to the motor system, I have labeled as the Fluid Motion Factor program. It is not my process; it is everybody’s process. This process HAS to be accessed to produce a fluid, well-timed swing. It also explains that when golfers play well, they are not thinking that much. Thinking involves getting the PFC too involved in the swing.

So back to our initial conversation with our top-notch golfer. The main reason why he played well one day and not the next is on the good-ball striking day he accessed the Fluid Motion Factor consistently and the day he didn’t strike the ball well, he didn’t. Could it be that simple? Yes. If someone took videos on both days, of course, they would see differences in the swing. That would be obvious because something had to adversely happen during the swing on the second day.

But the question is why did it happen? One has to file down to where the swing originated to fundamentally answer that question. In the next series of articles, I will write about more aspects of the Fluid Motion Factor and how to access it more consistently.

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Steven Yellin is founder of the revolutionary Fluid Motion Factor program and teaches it at the Leadbetter Golf Academy in Orlando. Steven has written two books, The 7 Secrets of World Class Athletes and The Fluid Motion Factor. He has developed a certification program for golf instructors that has been taken by some of the top golf teachers around the world, including the National coach of Denmark and the Olympic coach of France. His program has been taught in 12 sports including seven professional sports. He has produced two DVD’s: one for golf and one for bowling.

3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Scoot

    Jul 10, 2019 at 9:18 am

    Typos on typos in this article.

  2. Mike

    Jul 7, 2019 at 9:07 am

    Let’s see…keeping it in the fairway, decent approach shots & short game on point (esp putting). Don’t need a scientist to analyze it any further than that.

    • Tom

      Jul 8, 2019 at 6:00 am

      This is literally just an add for the authors product.

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