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Ping Blueprint irons are officially coming to retail

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After what has been much speculation they are here: Ping’s Blueprint forged blades.

Born from the idea of creating a club for the most exacting of golfers, Ping meticulously prototyped and tested in house with their tour staff and other highly skilled players on everything from preferred shots, grind, to blade size and shape. When it comes to shape, the Blueprints are one of the smallest blades on the market, but there’s some reasoning behind this.

From Ping:

“After extensive in-house research with varying head sizes, the findings revealed the theory of “aim small, miss small” was validated by many of the highly skilled players in the test, who produced tighter stat areas when hitting the more compact head.”

Only the bravest golfer will take on this 2-iron

It makes a lot of sense when you consider the fact that the more you concentrate mass, the more that mass will transfer energy when you get close to it right? It was that final design that we saw out on tour around nine months ago that has ended up becoming what we will see at retail. Tried tested and ready for fittings and finding their way into golf bags.

From Ping’s President John K Solheim:

“When we launched it on tour, a few players put it in play immediately and it wasn’t long before we had our first win. Based on a lot of their input, we were able to deliver exactly what they were looking for while expanding our iron offerings into a new category. We’re very pleased with the development process we went through and are looking forward to applying our learnings to future PING products.”

Like everything Ping, the company has gone the extra mile when it comes to engineering every last aspect of these irons. Even something as simple as a tip weight has a calculation attached to it. Just like the G410 irons, the Blueprint irons have a visible tungsten toe weight.

Let me explain: basically every iron on the market utilizes a tip weight, either inserted into the shaft or into a port in the bottom of the hosel. (We’re about to go deep into the weeds from a design standpoint but stick with me). There is 100 percent nothing wrong with OEMs using tip weights to achieve desired swing weight but when you use them you move the CG closer to the hosel/heel side of the club…not on a humanly noticeable level but certainly from a definite engineering perspective.

This is why Ping has always placed the CTP (Custom Tuning Port) in the middle of the club head, directly behind the COG. But with a forged blade this is NOT possible because it’s solid metal, but there is a way to keep that COG EXACTLY where you want it: taking the amount of needed mass, dividing it by two and placing equal amounts in the hosel and in the toe. Simple? Yes. Done by anyone else? No.

Ping Blueprint irons construction

Ping is utilizing a four-step, multi-stage process for the one-piece forging to create the Blueprint forged iron. This process provides very tight dimensional tolerance control within the compact design. The high-strength, 8620 carbon steel (same material used in the Glide forged wedges) increases the iron’s durability compared to other carbon steels, ensuring long-lasting performance. The Blueprint irons go through more than 50 steps in the manufacturing process, including milling faces and grooves to ensure quality control club after club with each and every head checked for absolute accuracy.

Details

  • Available in 2-PW, starting at $230 per club
  • Stock shaft options: True Temper Dynamic Gold 120 (S300, X100), Ping AWT 2.0 (R, S, X) with all other Ping shafts available at additional cost
  • Arccos Smart Sensor grips available at an additional cost

 

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Ryan Barath is part of the Digital Content Creation Team for GolfWRX. He hosts the "On Spec" Podcast on the GolfWRX Radio Network which focuses on discussing everything golf, including gear, technology, fitting, and course architecture. He is a club-fitter & master club builder with more than 17 years of experience working with golfers of all skill levels, including PGA Tour players. He is the former Build Shop Manager & Social Media Coordinator for Modern Golf. He now works independently from his home shop and is a member of advisory panels to a select number of golf equipment manufacturers. You can find Ryan on Twitter and Instagram where he's always willing to chat golf, and share his passion for club building, course architecture and wedge grinding.

24 Comments

24 Comments

  1. Mark

    Jun 9, 2019 at 11:47 am

    I tried those irons today. They are so easy to hit straight (smaller MOI makes it easier to square the face) and really very forgiving as for blades. There is no comparison to traditional Miura blades that are more demanding for sure. I am 2 hcp and I don’t think at all that better players will have any problem hitting them but rather will play better. This is one of bigger innovations lately.

  2. Dave r

    Jun 6, 2019 at 9:19 am

    Ping has to come up with a smaller golf ball now just so you can hit them. Just think at $100.00 bucks a dozen you would have the best of both worlds. You would be the envey of your club.

  3. Chris

    May 27, 2019 at 6:15 pm

    The blade length is WAY TOO SHORT. Otherwise, good looking iron.

  4. JP

    May 21, 2019 at 12:38 am

    Ping can thank PXG for allowing the price gouging. It’s ridiculous, but almost expected these days. Now with all these oem’s following in PXG’s model, PXG themselves introduces a lower priced iron model! They do a 180 and once again twist up the market! Haha.
    .
    Once my irons show heavy signs of wear, I won’t be buying anything. I’ll send them in to get cleaned up and rechromed. They’ll never leave the bag.

  5. Dan

    May 20, 2019 at 10:13 pm

    Thanks for the specs

  6. No Diggity

    May 20, 2019 at 7:31 pm

    was excited and debating picking up a set till the $1610 number showed up. You can pick up a new set of Cobra Mbs AND a F9 driver for that price and still have some greens fees cash left over.

  7. Rolando Rushay

    May 20, 2019 at 5:55 pm

    I love Ping irons..Have used them for years!! I play with the cavity backed and play well. I tried switching to forged irons & they’re not for me. Unless one is a Tour professional the average weekend player needs to keep it simple and easy because golf is a difficult game to play…why make it hard & costly..$230/ WOW!!!!

  8. T-Bone

    May 20, 2019 at 5:32 pm

    So PING made their name back in the 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s by inventing perimeter weighting. Now, in 2019, their touting the same blade technology they supposedly made obsolete way back when. Oh, and this 1940’s technology will now cost you what you could have bought a house for back then.

  9. Tom54

    May 20, 2019 at 5:13 pm

    Gorgeous club – funny name – way too expensive. $1800 for 8 irons? No thanks

  10. joe

    May 20, 2019 at 4:54 pm

    Don’t worry they will be in bargain bin in 5 years.

  11. todd

    May 20, 2019 at 4:34 pm

    TW irons are $250/ea, Miura are $280, PXG are $400, CNCPT are $500/ea. So the cost on these are outlandish because…

    I’m sure I would be deadly accurate buttering my toast in the morning with these. Hitting them would likely be another story 😉

  12. Cdub

    May 20, 2019 at 4:19 pm

    Looked amazing until seeing the price.

  13. Get in the hole

    May 20, 2019 at 3:17 pm

    $230 a club is outrageous. Just pricing the consumer out of the sport. But that said, these are for the serious of serious golfers. Ping does make good quality $600 iron sets that would work well for the majority of golfers. If you’re sporting these and not playing to at least a 2 handicap, you’re dumb.

    • Steve

      May 20, 2019 at 3:41 pm

      True, but not true enough! I’d wager a 2 hdcp would miss the 2-5i’s at least 30% of the time. Why put yourself through that kind of misery? A real player wouldn’t let ego cost himself that many strokes.

  14. Carl

    May 20, 2019 at 2:51 pm

    At $230 per club, you better be making money with these.
    If not, you’re looking like a poser.

    • David Lehmann

      May 20, 2019 at 3:20 pm

      Thats less than PXG and these look a heckuva lot better than those “toys”.

  15. steve

    May 20, 2019 at 2:51 pm

    I’d like to offer a couple of thoughts about this new offering from Ping. First, wow!, that is a good looking club. Second, how many people do they really expect will pay $200+/iron For a full set? Lastly, I play to a three handicap. So while I am not bad, I am certainly not that great. I do this with a premier weighted set of irons. Why would I want to make the game more difficult than it needs to be? Club manufactures need to know that NOT ALL of us are clueless consumers

    • Steve

      May 20, 2019 at 3:09 pm

      Correction…Premier should read “perimeter”

  16. BWatts

    May 20, 2019 at 2:42 pm

    Cue the Miura Baby Blade comparison! Smaller head=more mass concentrated to put into the ball. Last week I tested my small blades against ‘more friendly’ offerings: Mizuno, Cally Apex Pro, Srizon etc…none got the ball speed my small blades delivered. Cool to see this theory proved out by PING!

  17. dat

    May 20, 2019 at 1:50 pm

    Insane price. Perhaps PXG should offer to buy Ping, or is it the other way around?

  18. Milo

    May 20, 2019 at 1:28 pm

    Damn those are sexy, makes me drool. But for that price, maybe I’ll pick some up in 4 years.

  19. Ray

    May 20, 2019 at 11:24 am

    Wow! $230 per club?

    I’ve admired Ping and their engineering but that’s a pretty penny given some of the other irons in this class.

    • gunmetal

      May 20, 2019 at 12:41 pm

      Yeah, these guys like Ben Hogan and their ‘direct to’ model is going to start looking more and more attractive if we keep delving into $1600 7 piece iron sets, IMO.

  20. Dave Lawrence

    May 20, 2019 at 11:03 am

    Specs (in case anyone was curious):

    2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 PW
    ___________________________________________________

    17.5 20 23.5 27 30.5 34 38 42 46

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Whats in the Bag

Rory McIlroy WITB: 2020 Memorial Tournament (new irons)

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Driver: TaylorMade SIM (8 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Kuro Kage XTS 70 X (45.5 inches, 59.25 lie, D4)

3-wood: TaylorMade SIM Max (15)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro White 80 TX

5-wood: TaylorMade SIM Max (19 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei CK Pro White 80 TX

Irons: TaylorMade P7MB (3-PW)
Shaft: Project X Rifle 7.0 (6.5 in PW)

Wedges: TaylorMade MG2 (54-09SB, 60-08LB)
Shaft: Project X Rifle 6.5

Putter: TaylorMade Spider X Copper (34.25, 2.5 loft, 70 lie)

Ball: 2019 TaylorMade TP5 (#22)

Grips: Golf Pride Tour Velvet Cord (58R 1+1, logo down)

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What GolfWRXers are saying about Martini Tees

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@golf_ladies

In our forums, our members have been discussing Martini Tees and the popularity surrounding them. WRXer ‘Used2PlayAlot’ asks members ‘what is the hype around the tees?’, and WRXers have been sharing their thoughts on why golfers love them.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • goaliedad30: “My wife loves them … she’s an improving high handicapper, and it guarantees that she tees the ball at the same height every time. It really promotes consistency. I’ve also gone to using them for the same reason, and it definitely helps me, even as a low handicapper. A bag of 5 is literally a lifetime supply for the two of us! Can’t break ’em, and can’t lose ’em! (Hers are electric pink ….).”
  • ShortSticks: “I don’t know anything about the hype, but they were offered for sale about 3 or 4 years ago at most of the courses I play, and I thought they were cool, so I bought about 5 or 6 in different colors. Still have all of them and haven’t had to buy any tees in that time. They are virtually indestructible, and the bright colors are easy to spot. A couple of times I left one on a tee box, I promptly drove back to retrieve them and still have all the ones I originally bought. I have a neon yellow one I call the Forever-Tee.”
  • ChipNRun: “Benefits of Martini tees: Very durable; more likely to lose one every four rounds than break one. Help you keep ball teed at uniform height on tee shots, especially if the tee boxes area bit chopped up. That said, I can press down an extra 1/8″ to keep the ball low into wind. If you’re a senior and hands get a bit shaky on 14th hole in a 118* heat index, you have a bigger tee top target on which to set the ball. (Note: I still put six 1.5″ wooden tees at the ready for par 3 holes and hybrid/4i driving hole)”
  • platgolf: “I got some, and they last. I use the step version, and it is much more consistent as said. I give away my non-step to fellow golfers till their gone. I like the yellow the best as it matches my golf balls.”

Entire Thread: “Martini Tees” 

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What GolfWRXers are saying about low lofted drivers

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In our forums, our members have been discussing low lofted drivers. WRXer ‘Killerswing1’ asks fellow members if anyone is currently playing a low lofted driver, and what are the benefits of doing so, and WRXers have been having their say in our forums.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire thread and have your say at the link below.

  • Vater: “Bryson has a 7.5* that he cranks down to 5.5* which is kind of crazy, but he’s a beast now. Morikawa has an 8.0* that he has dialed up to 9.5*. I used to have a 10.5* driver that I kept adjusting down, for a while below 9* because my flight was too high. Now I game a 9.5* that I’m considering cranking down a notch or two. I’m not particularly fast or strong; I think it’s just the way that I make contact needs less loft. Otherwise, the ball just sails upward.”
  • cgasucks: “In general, ever since the solid core ball was the norm, the trend was drivers having higher degree lofts for the high launch and low spin for most players. People with low lofted drivers have either a crazy swing speed (125+ MPH) that imparts a lot of spin and/or have a very upward attack angle. Most golfers with swing speeds under 100 MPH need more spin to keep the ball the in air.”
  • dmeeksDC: “I think it depends on the head. I can easily hit a low-lofted Ping driver because they seem to launch higher. Same with Srixon. So I’ll go with 9-degree heads in those and even dial it down and confirmed this was best in fittings. In other heads, such as TM M6, the 10.5 fit me better. These were all with swings in the 103-105 range.”
  • jploper: “Personally, I like about 8 degrees; otherwise, I get zero roll out and balloon into the wind.”

Entire Thread: “Low lofted drivers”

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