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A modern blueprint to breaking 90

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In May of 2017, I contributed an article that generated a lot of interest from GolfWRX readers:  “A Modern Blueprint to Breaking 80.” I recently got a call from Jeff Isler, a long-time client who runs a successful golf academy in Dallas.  Jeff enthusiastically uses my Strokes Gained analysis program (ShotByShot.com) with all of his students, and also uses my breaking 80 goals as his “road map” with aspiring elite junior golfers.  Jeff wondered if a similar roadmap could be created for golfers attempting to break 90. Certainly!  In thinking about it, I believe there are also the number of interested golfers in this scoring range in the vast GolfWRX.com world.

Want to break 90?  Here is my blueprint

The game is a puzzle and all the pieces fit together. Each round is a mix of good shots, average shots and bad shots or errors. The challenge is to find the piece of your game’s unique puzzle that is your greatest weakness so you can target your improvement time and money on the highest impact area. If you track the simple good and bad outcomes listed below for a few rounds, your strengths and weaknesses will become apparent.

Tee Game or Driving

Goals:  Hit 7 fairways, and limit your driving errors to 2 – preferably of the No Shot variety (see Errors below).

Distance:  I will ignore this and assume that you are playing from the appropriate tees for your game.

Fairways:  Hitting fairways is important as we are all more accurate from the short grass.

Errors:  Far more important than Fairways hit is your FREQUENCY and SEVERITY of misses. ShotByShot.com users record THREE types of Driving Errors:

  1. No Shot:  You have missed in a place from which you do not have a normal next shot, requiring some sort of advancement to get the ball back to normal play.
  2. Penalty:  A 1-stroke penalty due to hazard or unplayable lie.
  3. Lost/OB:  Stroke and distance penalty.

Approach Shots

Goals:  5 GIRs and 1 Penalty/2nd (see below)

Penalty/2nd:  This means either a penalty or a shot hit so poorly that you are left with yet another full approach shot greater than 50 yards from the hole.

Short Game

(Shots from within 50 yards of the hole)

Chip/Pitch: If you miss 13 greens, you will have at least 10 greenside save opportunities. Your goals should be:

  • % Saved:  20% (two saves)
  • % Errors:  15% shots that miss the green (approximately three every two rounds)

Sand:

You should have 2 greenside save opportunities.  Your goals:

  • % Saved:  10%
  • % Errors:  30% of your shots miss the green (approximately 1 in every 3 attempts)

Putting

You need 36 putts.  Aim for:

  • 1-Putts:  3
  • 3-Putts:  2

Good luck and please let me know when you are successful!

For a complete Strokes Gained Analysis of your game, log on to:  shotbyshot.com.

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In 1989, Peter Sanders founded Golf Research Associates, LP, creating what is now referred to as Strokes Gained Analysis. His goal was to design and market a new standard of statistically based performance analysis programs using proprietary computer models. A departure from “traditional stats,” the program provided analysis with answers, supported by comparative data. In 2006, the company’s website, ShotByShot.com, was launched. It provides interactive, Strokes Gained analysis for individual golfers and more than 150 instructors and coaches that use the program to build and monitor their player groups. Peter has written, or contributed to, more than 60 articles in major golf publications including Golf Digest, Golf Magazine and Golf for Women. From 2007 through 2013, Peter was an exclusive contributor and Professional Advisor to Golf Digest and GolfDigest.com. Peter also works with PGA Tour players and their coaches to interpret the often confusing ShotLink data. Zach Johnson has been a client for nearly five years. More recently, Peter has teamed up with Smylie Kaufman’s swing coach, Tony Ruggiero, to help guide Smylie’s fast-rising career.

6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Myron Miller

    May 7, 2019 at 10:33 am

    His comment that distance is ignored because you are playing the correct tees. On some courses, I can play the up tees and can still not reach the greens in regulation. I am a super senior (over 70) disabled and cannot consistently hit any longer than 150. Par 3s of 160 or more ( even from the up tees are almost impossible to reach in 1). Par 4s of 330 or more (and I’ve seen 350-370 a number of times) cannot be reached in two.

    With highly exceeding the rest of his suggestions, one cannot score below 100 period. Personally I can break 90 most of the time, if my approach game is reasonably decent and my short game is pretty good (at least 70% from 20 yards on the green within 20 yards). And I only mishit 2-3 fairway woods. Due to my short driver, I hit a lot of fairway woods as my second shot (and I’m playing the up tees). His suggestions to me are a load of crap. I could never break 110 or 120 if i followed them.

  2. Bob Jones

    May 6, 2019 at 5:41 pm

    Are we talking to people who are on the verge of breaking 90 but never do? If that is the case, I would say learning how to play the game better will do it. Golf is more than hitting good shots; it’s also about hitting the right shot at the time. Leaving the driver home should help, too.

  3. Johnny O

    May 6, 2019 at 3:58 pm

    I shoot in the 90s and I keep stats: tee shots, approach shots, GIR, putts, dropped shots and eff-ups. Dropped shots are penalties, like OB, re-tees, water. Eff-ups include the dropped shots and other duffs and stupid hits that cost a whole shot. I can tell you that when I get some sleep and play well and shoot in the 80s, the key stat is the eff-ups. A reduction in stupid mistakes, shots I’d never hit again if I placed another ball and repeated the attempt. I don’t suddenly become a dead straight driver or genius green reader. Yeah, if you have a bunker phobia, then you know you need to work on that. But if you’re just generally ordinary, then reducing errors will also get those other target numbers into line. 7 to 9 good drives and 5 or 6 GIRs sounds about right.

  4. dj

    May 5, 2019 at 5:47 pm

    “If you think 18 handicappers have the patience or commitment to do a rote breakdown of their round by sifting through GIRs, penalties off the tee, and 3 putts.”

    Anyone that wants to improve should keep stats to know where to improve. I’m not 100% in agreement with the topic but believe GIR are king. If you don’t know where you are losing strokes, you’ll never improve. Most people have a false sense of strokes lost/gained.

  5. Leezer99

    May 5, 2019 at 12:18 pm

    No offense but this is a joke of a blueprint. The Brady Riggs Breaking 80 plan actually gives you a step by step plan over time to improve your game.

  6. Eric

    May 5, 2019 at 11:37 am

    This is not the best way to break 90. If you think 18 handicappers have the patience or commitment to do a rote breakdown of their round by sifting through GIRs, penalties off the tee, and 3 putts.

    A more practical approach includes hitting the shot you know you’re capable of and never putting yourself to a difficult decision on the subsequent shot.

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Instruction

Brooks Koepka’s grip secret

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Here is a great video on understanding what allows a great player to get through the ball and deliver hardcore to his targets. Without this part of his grip, he would be hard-pressed to deliver anything with any kind of smash factor and compression. See what you can learn from his grip.

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Swing speed vs. quality impact

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In today’s age of hitting the ball as hard and as far as you can on tour, I am amazed at the number of amateur golfers who totally disregard the idea of quality impact. In fact, you can hit the ball further with better impact than you can with poor impact and more speed (to a point.) Sure, if you can kick the clubhead speed up 10 MPH-plus versus your normal speed, then this is not a requirement, but in reality most players only swing a few MPH faster when they actually try. Yes, this is true, I see it day after day. You might think you can swing 10 MPH faster but rarely do I see more than 2-3 MPH tops.

I had a student that came in the other day and was obsessed with swinging harder but when he did his impacts were terrible! When I put him on Trackman and showed him the data he was astounded that he could swing slower yet produce more distance.

Here was a typical swing he made when swinging faster 105.8 mph where the impact was low on the face and the ball carried 222.3 yards.


Here was a typical swing he made when swinging slower 102.9 mph where the impact was much better on the face and the ball carried 242.7 yards.

Now, obviously we know that this works to a certain degree of swing speed but it does show you that focusing on quality impact is a key as well. I’m always telling my players that I want them to swing as hard and as fast as they can AND maintain quality impact location — if you can do both then you can have it all!

The best way to understand impact quality without dismantling your swing is to use foot spray to coat the face of the club then hit a few balls to see where impact normally occurs and see if you can adjust.


If you can, great, if not, then go see your teaching professional and figure out why so you can find quality impact once and for all!

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Instruction

How to warm up for golf PROPERLY

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Leo Rooney, Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance, shows you how to get ready to hit balls and/or hit the golf course.

Who is Leo Rooney?

Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance
B.Sc Exercise Physiology
TPI, NSCA

Leo Rooney played 16 years of competitive golf, in both college and professionally. He got a degree in exercise physiology and has worked with anyone from top tour players to beginners. Leo is now the Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance and is responsible for the overall operations but still works closely with some elite tour players and the UCLA Men’s Golf Team.

He also has experience in long driving with a personal best 445-yard drive in the 2010 European Long driving Championship.

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