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Odyssey Arm Lock putters: In-hand photos and story

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Odyssey Arm Lock Putter

The USGA and R&A’s proposal to ban the practice of “anchoring” during the golf swing has left many golfers with doubts about their continued use of anchored putting styles, which will likely be outlawed by golf’s ruling bodies in 2016.

Odyssey latest line of putters, called “Arm Lock,” could be a lifeline for those golfers. Released just two days the proposed anchor ban, Arm Lock putters are the latest legal option on the shelves for golfers who struggle with conventional-length putters.

At first glance, the Arm Locks look much like Odyssey’s Metal-X belly putters. The two available models, the Metal-X #7 and Metal-X DART, use belly putter heads, belly putter-length shafts and Odyssey’s standard belly putter lie angle of 71 degrees. But their shafts are bent 4 degrees forward toward a golfer’s lead arm, which allows them to be anchored against the inside of a golfer’s forearm throughout the stroke. To negate the effects of the forward shaft bend, Arm Lock putter heads are made with 7 degrees of loft, which gives the putters Odyssey’s desired loft of 3 degrees when placed in the playing position.

Like belly and chest-anchored putting styles, forearm-anchored putters will help golfers make more consistent putting strokes, minimizing wrist breakdown and forearm rotation. But because the end of the putter grip will move freely with the movement of the putter head and not be anchored in the belly or chest, golf’s ruling bodies decided not to propose a ban the style.

Rollison said that when using a forearm-anchored putter, golfers should make a stroke as if they are using a conventional length putter. Because the end of the putter grip is stabilized against a golfer’s lead forearm, their stroke will be dominated by the rocking of the shoulders, not the movement of the hands and forearms.

“The stroke really accentuates the use of the left arm doing the work and the right arm helping guide it along,” Rollinson said. “It’s a lot like a free throw in basketball, one hand shoots and the other is there to help guide the ball.”

The Arm Lock putters won’t negate forearm rotation as effectively as belly and long putters, but one area where the Arm Lock putters have an edge is fitting. With belly and long putters, getting the right length and lie is essential. But with Arm Lock putters, length is less of a concern, which is why the two models are only being offered in one length – 43 inches.

Ideally, Arm Lock putters should be used with the grip resting a few inches short of the crook of the lead arm. If the putter is too long, the butt end will rest off a golfer’s lead arm, decreasing stability. But the fix is simple – cut the putter to a length that places the grip in the proper position.

“We love belly and long putters because we think they help golfers,” Rollison said. But we see the proposed rule change as an opportunity to innovate within the rules set by the USGA and R&A.”

Check out more photos below, or click here to see what members are saying in the putter forum. 

Check out more photos below, or click here to see what members are saying in the putter forum. 

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15 Comments

15 Comments

  1. STEVE

    Sep 21, 2015 at 6:02 pm

    WHO CARES I AM USING MY LONG PUTTER TILL DEATH DUE PART I AM 69 HAVE ANXIETY AND I AM THROUGH PLAYING IN ANY TOURNAMENTS ESPECIALLY USGA STUFF AS FAR AS I AM CONCERNED THEY DONT EXIST ANYMORE. THEY ARENT THINKING ABOUT AMATEUR WEEKEND GOLFERS LIKE THE GUY BEFORE OLD WEALTHY MEN WHO WANT TO MAKE A NAME FOR THEMSELVES.

  2. Al

    May 30, 2013 at 3:41 pm

    There are many people with ailments like Parkinsons, various tremors, and amputations that require anchored putters. They are older though and probably shouldn’t be allowed to compete with younger folks.

  3. Gary Lewis

    Dec 16, 2012 at 2:01 am

    I have experimented with this kind of a setup a little and it seems very awkward to me, perhaps because I am not doing it correctly. I have had better success with using the long putter but not anchoring it. Seems like that can work pretty good, as long as the left arm hugs the body and doesn’t point out towards the target. A change in lie angle might be required for it but it might be a pretty good alternative for people who have the yips so bad they can’t use a short putter.

  4. Tom tucker

    Dec 15, 2012 at 9:10 am

    I have been teaching this method for years – no need to bend the putter or adjust loft, just play it forward enough in your stance. It works very well for short putts, lag putts takes some work.

  5. Barry

    Dec 13, 2012 at 5:32 am

    Clones of Taylor Made rubbish. What a joke!

  6. Shark

    Dec 12, 2012 at 12:22 pm

    I have been anchoring the putter against my left forearm ever since I was a kid, even with a conventional length putter to keep my left wrist from breaking down on the follow-through. I got a Cleveland (short) belly putter and use that on my left forearm now since they make one and now I don’t have to hunch over. I also use my own version of the claw or saw grip and that really feels nice.

  7. jim

    Dec 12, 2012 at 11:50 am

    I’m with Dorf – playing thru 11:59pm on 12/31/2015 with my legal belly putter and I will not feel guilty. The USGA has no interest in me or my game – just a bunch of very wealthy old men who have the ability to impart their wishes on us. There will be many of options for us 3 years from now.

  8. Davide

    Dec 11, 2012 at 7:29 am

    Danny play guttaperka balls!

  9. Dorf

    Dec 10, 2012 at 10:59 pm

    I’m using my anchored belly putter until Dec. 31, 2015. Should be plenty of these Kuchar style putters (by many manufacturers) to choose from by then.

  10. Kyle

    Dec 10, 2012 at 10:28 pm

    Iv been playing with a putter like this for years. You can make one your self. Just get a long shaft and bend it with you machine than bend it just right with your foot. Its that easy.

  11. Chad

    Dec 10, 2012 at 6:23 pm

    I agree 100% with Aaron. We should be trying to make this game EASIER for people to play. We are involved in a sport that is dependent on keeping people interested and creating new interest to start playing year after year. The putter ban is just hurting that, however small the anchored putting community is… If something really has to be done on the Pro level (it doesn’t) it should be a condition of competition not a rule change

  12. aaron

    Dec 10, 2012 at 12:36 am

    Danny, play wood headed woods. Long putters are just a way to play better, just like HUGE headed metal woods. Take advantage of what works for you, its a hard game. Idont use a long putter, but disagree with the ban.

  13. Peter

    Dec 9, 2012 at 9:14 pm

    There is no ‘genius’ in this. Hasn’t Matt Kuchar already used this (and added loft to his putter)? This just seems like a reaction after probably being annoyed by the banning decision.

  14. Danny

    Dec 9, 2012 at 11:24 am

    I have an idea, learn to putt like men.

  15. Austin

    Dec 8, 2012 at 3:28 pm

    Would love it if Ping would follow suit with this idea and possibly replace existing adjustable belly putters with a forward “arm lock” shaft. Might save me a little $$$$.

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Whats in the Bag

WITB Time Machine: Phil Mickelson WITB, 2016 Waste Management Phoenix Open

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  • Equipment is accurate as of the Waste Management Phoenix Open (2016).

Driver: Callaway XR 16 Sub Zero (8.5 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Fubuki J 60 X (tipped 1 inch, 45.5 inches)

3-wood: Callaway X Hot 3 Deep (13 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Fubuki J 70 X (tipped 1.5 inches)

Hybrid: Callaway Apex (18 degrees)
Shaft: Mitsubishi Diamana S Hybrid 100 TX

Utility iron: Callaway Apex UT (21 degrees)
Shaft: KBS Tour-V 125

Irons: Callaway Apex Pro ’16 (5-PW)
Shafts: KBS Tour-V 125

Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy PM Grind Wedge (56-13, 60-10, 64-10)
Shafts: KBS Tour-V 125

Putter: Odyssey “Phil Mickelson” Blade
Grip: Odyssey by SuperStroke JP40

Ball: Callaway Chrome Soft (2016)

Grip: Golf Pride MCC Black/White

WITB Notes: Mickelson uses the rearward weight setting in his XR 16 Sub Zero driver.

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Greatest Adams hybrids of all time

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It’s almost impossible that, over the past decade, you or someone you played golf with didn’t own an Adams hybrid. The fact that they can still be found in the bags of players on the PGA Tour demonstrates the kind of cult-like dedication some players have to those clubs.

They were in everyone’s bags—from low handicaps to golfers just trying to break 100. Simply, Adams was hybrids in the early-to-mid 2000s. In an age when many would still call them “cheater” or “old man” clubs, Adams pushed the envelope of design and ushered in a new era of small, workable-yet-forgiving, anti-left clubs.

Adams was also one of the first companies to do exclusive combo sets off the rack for better players with the initial Idea Pros and then later with the Idea Pro Golds. It’s a common practice now, but at the time it was revolutionary.

Here is a list of some of Adams’ all-time great hybrid designs.

Original Idea Pro – 2008

This is the one that started it all. After going through a number of tour issue prototypes leading up to the retail release, the Idea Pro had a lot of buzz, and it delivered. It wasn’t that other companies weren’t producing hybrids at the time, but the sheer popularity of the Adams outweighed what others had in the market thanks to it working its way to become the number one hybrid on the PGA Tour. It also came stock with an 80g Aldila VS Proto Hybrid shaft that was directly aimed at better players, and considering the aftermarket price of the shaft on its own, it made the Idea Pro a no brainer for those looking to replace harder-to-hit longer irons.

XTD – 2014

This was the final hybrid ever made by Adams and was packed with technology: all-titanium construction, crown, and sole slots for greater face deflection and ball speed—along with an adjustable hosel. TaylorMade had taken over ownership at this point and engineers at Adams took advantage by using the proprietary TaylorMade adjustable sleeve—this allowed for more shaft options for many golfers that had used TaylorMade hybrids in the past.

The entire XTD line from Adams was premium by design and from the driver to the hybrid, offered real-deal shafts and tight quality control. This is still a hard club to beat.

Idea XTD Super Hybrid Ti – 2012

You could argue the 2012 Super Hybrid XTD was the original bomber hybrid. Thanks to the multi-material titanium construction, it produced a higher-than-expected launch, along with exceptionally low spin. For faster players, this was a perfect control club off the tee and easily replaced a 5-wood (in the 19 degree). Don’t believe it? Check out this historic review from the GolfWRX Archives: GolfWRX.com – Adams Super Hybrid Review (2012)

Super 9031 – 2013

The Super 9031 was released the year after the original Idea Pro Blacks and featured an updated white paint job along with a technology upgrade that included both sole and crown slots for faster ball speeds compared to the original (hence the “Super” designation). It has a high toe, flatter lie angle, and open appearance from address—something better players love! Although I should attempt to be unbiased, I will admit that not only did I love these hybrids, but I still hold a place in one of my travel bags.

It’s not just me that has a sweet spot for the Super 9031, you can still find these in the bag of PGA Tour player Brian Gay.

Boxer A3 Idea – 2007

You might be wondering that after all of the others on the list, how the A3 earned its spot. Well, it’s quite simple. Just before the launch of the Idea Pro, the A3 and A3OS (oversized) were massive sellers at the retail level. The sets offered classicly shaped irons alongside easy-to-hit hybrid clubs into the longer clubs. Although never marketed towards better players, it did have a bit of a cult following to the point that even Vijay Singh was using one during the 2008 season in replacement of a 5-wood. They came stock with Grafalloy ProLaunch Red hybrid shafts and in both right and left-handed to outfit almost any player.

GolfWRXers, did you have any of these clubs? Check out the Cult Classic Clubs Discussion in the GolfWRX.com forums.

 

 

 

 

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Equipment

SeeMore releases new RST Hosel series of plumber neck design putters

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2020 SeeMore RST Hosel series

For 2020, SeeMore has introduced their new RST Hosel series of plumber neck design putters in 7 models.

Through RifleScope Technology (RST), the fluted barrel hosel aims to bring a new approach to the classic offset plumber neck in a design where player’s hands will sit slightly forward of the ball at address and impact.

2020 SeeMore RST Hosel series

For the first time in company history, SeeMore has combined a plumber neck hosel with their RifleScope Alignment Technology.

Designed for players to place their hands forward, the putters utilize the company’s RST alignment system which is often seen in the company’s straight shaft putters. The RST alignment system hides the red dot of the putters (to lock in your alignment) by using the lower portion of the new RST Hosel.

2020 SeeMore RST Hosel series

The RST alignment system is designed to provide a true reference point for golfers leading to an improved set up and stroke. Per the company, the technology ensures “that the putter face will be square to the target at set up, address and impact, with the loft of the putter also set the same every time giving a consistent roll on every putt.”

2020 SeeMore RST Hosel series

The base of the plumber neck in the new series enters the head on a single plane angle, at 70 degrees. The design aims to provide an entry point of connection closer to the sweet spot than a standard plumber neck – leading to improved feel and balance.

The 2020 SeeMore RST Hosel series are available to purchase now at SeeMore.com with prices ranging from $250-$400.

2020 SeeMore RST Hosel series

 

 

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