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Most golfers believe they have to lean toward the ground to hit a ball that is on the ground. What this video demonstrates is that the best players in history are flat to the earth in balance and don’t lean over at all. Put this principle in your game, and it will make all your shots easier — from driving to putting.
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Northbound Golf provides a comprehensive way to learn and play the game. Martin Ayers and Michael Powers have uncovered what great players do that makes them great. It’s an approach that you can adopt, irrespective of your current level of play. Martin Ayers is a former Australasia Tour player who has coached Major Champions Steve Elkington and Mike Weir, as well as 3 time PGA Tour winner Cameron Beckman. Michael Powers is a PGA Member from Boston, Massachusetts with over 25 years of coaching experience. At Northboundgolf.com you’ll find over six hours of instructional video content, question and answer podcasts, plus personal online coaching.

15 Comments

15 Comments

  1. Doug Kercher PGA Pro Australia

    Jan 8, 2019 at 5:59 am

    Plenty of know all commenting. If you saw Martin’s pure ball striking you would want what he has. Well done keyboard warriors.

  2. Gunter Eisenberg

    Jan 2, 2019 at 9:23 am

    Martin Ayers!?!? Automatic thumbs down.

  3. Ed LeBeau

    Dec 31, 2018 at 2:14 pm

    Unnecessarily complicated.
    Sole the club on the ground with the arms hanging and the weight the same in each foot with it just behind the balls of the feet.
    Maintain that weight distribution in the feet till impact.
    Thats balance.

    • Web

      Dec 31, 2018 at 2:30 pm

      Ed, you should talk with PGA Pro and teacher Bobby Greenwood in TN about balance and footwork. He is amazingly knowledgeable and experienced.

  4. Web

    Dec 31, 2018 at 11:25 am

    I could watch Snead swing all day long.

  5. George

    Dec 31, 2018 at 5:57 am

    Let’s see. Did Sam Snead in this video hit up on a teed ball? Did Bobby Jones? Did Jordan Speith? What clubs were they using? 460cc? So maybe JS’s upper body hangs back, because he wants to improve launch conditions? Or maybe it’s just a swing “fault” he developed to counter his chicken wings etc. etc.
    Oh, another thing. Maybe don’t use the phrase “flat to the earth” when you don’t mean parallel to the ground. JM2C

  6. wilbur

    Dec 31, 2018 at 12:51 am

    Ideal balance is determined using force plate technology underfoot. It tells you where the pressures are under your feet and where the pressure point from your body moves throughout the swing… otherwise it’s just a bunch of nebulous words.

    • geohogan

      Jan 2, 2019 at 9:10 pm

      @wilbur, ideal balance is determined by billions of neurons in our subconscious, without a conscious thought.

      How nebulous to think we would need force plate technology for proper balance. Imagining how much better the balance of Sam Snead if he only had force plate technology. LOL

      Good laugh to start a new year.

      .

  7. Dan Black

    Dec 30, 2018 at 8:17 am

    Every golfer that’s ever been worth a lick has anywhere from 35-43 degrees of forward bend/lean/tilt from the waist. I understand your concept but saying golfers do not lean forward is misleading and untrue. Nice video though.

  8. Ian

    Dec 30, 2018 at 7:08 am

    What did I just watch? This is more misleading than helpful. Were you trying to say you have to tilt (not lean over) to hit the ball (Balance is achieved by pushing out the rear end to counter the tilt of the torso)?

  9. geohogan

    Dec 29, 2018 at 10:35 am

    The human species would not have survived or evolved without an automatic balance system to keep us upright. It happens subconsciously.

    Our head and hips counter balance in the coronal plane, so of course our knees move to balance both sides of our torso. As we move the mass of our arms(about 30-40 pounds) from one side of your torso to the other, our subconscious knows automatically, to preprogram movement of hundreds of muscles to balance that movement of mass.

    Our balance mechanisms work exactly as they did for Sam Snead and Bobby Jones… subconsciously. Any attempt to control our balance with conscious movement of individual body parts is as ludicrous as trying to learn golf swing, one body part at a time.

  10. Will

    Dec 28, 2018 at 4:56 pm

    Snead reminds me of Cameron Champ.

    • geohogan

      Jan 10, 2019 at 7:41 pm

      @will, and reminds me of Ben Hogan
      All three drop into the slot and torso rotation brings the clubface to impact from the inside with little to no manipulation with the hands ….so much more consistent and less timing dependent, as taught by Monte and the like.

  11. Zek

    Dec 28, 2018 at 4:54 pm

    Talk with Bobby Greenwood, former PGA golfer and TN Hall of Famer about his teachings of balance and footwork.

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Instruction

Brooks Koepka’s grip secret

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Here is a great video on understanding what allows a great player to get through the ball and deliver hardcore to his targets. Without this part of his grip, he would be hard-pressed to deliver anything with any kind of smash factor and compression. See what you can learn from his grip.

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Instruction

Swing speed vs. quality impact

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In today’s age of hitting the ball as hard and as far as you can on tour, I am amazed at the number of amateur golfers who totally disregard the idea of quality impact. In fact, you can hit the ball further with better impact than you can with poor impact and more speed (to a point.) Sure, if you can kick the clubhead speed up 10 MPH-plus versus your normal speed, then this is not a requirement, but in reality most players only swing a few MPH faster when they actually try. Yes, this is true, I see it day after day. You might think you can swing 10 MPH faster but rarely do I see more than 2-3 MPH tops.

I had a student that came in the other day and was obsessed with swinging harder but when he did his impacts were terrible! When I put him on Trackman and showed him the data he was astounded that he could swing slower yet produce more distance.

Here was a typical swing he made when swinging faster 105.8 mph where the impact was low on the face and the ball carried 222.3 yards.


Here was a typical swing he made when swinging slower 102.9 mph where the impact was much better on the face and the ball carried 242.7 yards.

Now, obviously we know that this works to a certain degree of swing speed but it does show you that focusing on quality impact is a key as well. I’m always telling my players that I want them to swing as hard and as fast as they can AND maintain quality impact location — if you can do both then you can have it all!

The best way to understand impact quality without dismantling your swing is to use foot spray to coat the face of the club then hit a few balls to see where impact normally occurs and see if you can adjust.


If you can, great, if not, then go see your teaching professional and figure out why so you can find quality impact once and for all!

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Instruction

How to warm up for golf PROPERLY

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Leo Rooney, Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance, shows you how to get ready to hit balls and/or hit the golf course.

Who is Leo Rooney?

Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance
B.Sc Exercise Physiology
TPI, NSCA

Leo Rooney played 16 years of competitive golf, in both college and professionally. He got a degree in exercise physiology and has worked with anyone from top tour players to beginners. Leo is now the Director of Performance at Urban Golf Performance and is responsible for the overall operations but still works closely with some elite tour players and the UCLA Men’s Golf Team.

He also has experience in long driving with a personal best 445-yard drive in the 2010 European Long driving Championship.

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