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Forum Thread of the Day: “Best current generation blades?”

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Today’s Forum Thread of the Day comes from ghoonk, who asks fellow GolfWRX members for their thoughts on what are the best current generation blades on the market. Ghoonk opens the thread with his musings, after having used plenty of different blade irons at his local shop, and our members are quick to join in and offer their views on the subject.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • ghoonk: “Callaway Apex MB – tried the raw ones in the shop. Buttery soft, slightly on the heavy side but feeling more solid, and go a bit longer than my MC-501 irons. TaylorMade P730 – surprisingly nice to hit. I expected harsh and unpleasant, not a fan of the blingy chrome, but it feels quite a bit lighter than the Callaway and Miura. Decent distance makes a nice alternative to paying through your nose for the MC501.”
  • craz-e: “Tried most of the current offerings but have been put off by a lot of them as they are getting a bit on the large size. Favourite offerings are the Callaway, Titleist and Cobra blades. Still rocking my FG59’s and Baby Blades though. I’m looking forward to 2019 and seeing the new Wilson Staff and Srixon blades.”
  • nanosg: “TM 730s are really good after hitting them with my shaft at CC.  I have been playing Mizuno a long time, but would get the 730s over MP18MBs at this point. Hit them as well as my MP18SCs but they sound/feel better, and I think the looks are classic.  I’m tempted to get a set.”
  • No Gimmes: “Miura MB-001 are the best looking blades I’ve ever seen.”

Entire Thread: “Best current generation blades?”

 

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Gianni is the Assistant Editor at GolfWRX. He can be contacted at gianni@golfwrx.com. Follow him on Twitter @giannimosquito

9 Comments

9 Comments

  1. Senorsooner

    Dec 31, 2018 at 9:51 pm

    Srixon Z-945. Been trying to kick em out of my bag but they keep going back in.

  2. Ted Till

    Dec 31, 2018 at 4:47 pm

    Don’t short change Mizuno blades, they are and have been the gold standard for quite some time.
    In particular, MP4s, MP5s and MP18s are the best from Mizuno. MP18s the most recent true blades may be a little better than the 4s and 5s due to the dam flow forging enhancement to grain flow forging begun in 1998.

    I’ve tried most forged blades over the years and nothing beats Mizuno.

  3. Bud

    Dec 31, 2018 at 3:55 pm

    Agree that Callaway MB’s are the best with Ben Hogan FW’s a close second. Call away gets the edge because the blade looks more comp[act at address.

  4. Jack Nash

    Dec 31, 2018 at 1:32 pm

    Due to a couple of major surgeries in the last year I’ve lost some strength and have been looking at Mizuno Hot Metals reg shaft in steel. Like the look, and feel. Haven’t bit the bullet yet but am leaning in that direction. Thoughts?

  5. William Davis

    Dec 31, 2018 at 12:04 pm

    I take out a 32 year old set of Mizuno TP9 now and again and find I can hit bad shots just as easily as with my latest JPX. Apparently handicaps are ever increasing which is strange given all the improvements in equipment and current obsession with fitting.

  6. Lionel Mandrake

    Dec 31, 2018 at 11:17 am

    Ben Hogan FWs. Better than the rest. Full stop.

    • Shane

      Jan 1, 2019 at 1:15 pm

      ^^^^ what he said! If you haven’t tried them you are truly missing out!

  7. wilbur

    Dec 31, 2018 at 12:54 am

    I’ll wait for the next generation of new and improved blades…. because the current generation are obsolete now.

  8. Joe4Jet

    Dec 30, 2018 at 9:18 am

    Switched to Mizuno MP5’s last summer and it was the best transition I’ve ever made.

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Equipment

Can a better player be held back by playing a set of irons that are too forgiving? – GolfWRXers discuss

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In our forums, our members have been discussing if an iron that is ‘too forgiving’ can be detrimental to the better player. WRXer ‘MaddMaxx’ asks WRXers if his game could be made worse by going overkill on forgiveness, and our members have been offering up their thoughts on the issue in our forum.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • Mitchell: “Totally depends upon how you deliver the club into impact, typical conditions faced, and sensitivity to bounce/sole width offset, etc. Play regularly with a group of 12 guys that are all 4 or better in handicap, and three of them use what would be classified as GI irons because help them reach preferred trajectory windows with good distance and spin for their respective speeds and deliveries.”
  • DJ17: “The entire point of irons is controlling distance, trajectory, and spin consistently. If you can do that, then it doesn’t really matter the type of irons you have.”
  • ProjectX: “Kenny Perry won 14 times on the PGA Tour with “Game Improvement” irons while hitting nothing but draws. Couldn’t hit a fade to save his life and that probably held him back at times maybe even from winning a major. But 14 wins on the PGA Tour and 10 so far on the Champions Tour I would say that’s your answer.”
  • Valtiel: “Really the only thing that would “hold back” a better player using those types of irons would be the inability to control either spin, trajectory, or distance due to strong lofts, offset, and certain types of face tech. But if they can control their spin/distance and aren’t losing strokes on approach caused by the aforementioned, then it is all good really.”
  • bsavy83: “I’m 37 and started playing at age 8. Handicap around 3. I have never used a game improvement iron. I have certainly been tempted, but for me, there is a lack of feedback. To me, irons are all about feedback. Without it, you are grooving a bad swing. I heard some pro way back in the day say he spent all winter hitting into a net in his garage and the shots felt great. Gets outside that spring and realized he spent 3 months grooving a duck hook. That’s why I like an iron with feedback. I know what I’m doing wrong so I can stop.”

Entire Thread: “Can a better player be held back by playing a set of irons that are too forgiving?”

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What GolfWRXers are saying about the best fade biased hybrids

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In our forums, our members have been discussing fade biased hybrids. WRXer ‘samrudin’ is looking to replace his 4-iron with a hybrid and is on the hunt for one that is easy to work left to right for the right-hander. Our members share their thoughts.

Here are a few posts from the thread, but make sure to check out the entire discussion and have your say at the link below.

  • VNutz: “I haven’t hit it, but there was lots of talk that the SIM hybrid was anti-left. I play the Callaway Apex 19 hybrid, and it was designed to be anti-left. It doesn’t eliminate the lefts for me, but that’s operator error.”
  • cw1209: “By most standards, the Titleist 818 H2 is already a pretty neutral hybrid. The nice part is that it is adjustable. Try the flatter lie and less loft settings first (B1, D1, C1 if you are right-handed). This will make the face angle more open and promote a more left to right shot. I would also position the heavy side of the removable weight towards the toe. If none of those things work, try a different shaft. The AD DI is a great shaft that doesn’t work for everyone. Myself included.”
  • Tour Spoon: “I would try the flatter lie approach before anything. If you want to try something cheap and proven, pick up a used Adams Pro or Pro Gold with the Matrix Ozik Altus shaft. I am still playing the Pro Gold and its definitely fade biased.”
  • jlukes: “Hard to find a more fade biased hybrid than the h2 with the weight in the toe, set to flat, and lofted down.”
  • J13: “Callaway Mavrik Pro is one of the best hybrids I’ve hit in a while and definitely anti-left. But with all glued heads, you have to make sure the lie angle is right for you.”

Entire Thread: “Best fade biased hybrids?”

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2020 TaylorMade P770 irons: Distance and precision redefined

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New 2020 TaylorMade P770 irons are here, and with them, a reminder that every club in your bag has a purpose.

A driver is designed to go as far as possible, wedges are designed to be versatile precision instruments, and iron sets are built for both. The new 2020 TaylorMade P770 irons from TaylorMade bring together the distance of the extremely popular P790 with the precision of a midsized player cavity to offer distance and control to an iron unlike TaylorMade has ever produced.

2020 TaylorMade P770

2020 TaylorMade P770 6-iron. Cavity view.

TaylorMade P770 irons: The origin story

The story of the P770 starts with two clubs—the P760 and the P790. Now, if my math is correct, the combination of the two clubs would actually create the 775, but in the world of irons, that model number was taken over a decade ago by another OEM, and if we’re being honest, 770 sounds better anyways.

2020 TaylorMade P770, TaylorMade P790 comparison.

2020 TaylorMade P770, TaylorMade P790 comparison.

Let’s start with the P790 and its ability to infiltrate the golf bags of players of all skill levels. According to TaylorMade’s fitting database, the 790 is a club that can be found in the bags of players from +4 handicaps all the way up to golfers looking to break 100.

What makes the P790 so functional and appealing to so many golfers starts with its looks and ends with its performance. The P790 has the clean appearance of a blade iron from the back, and from address, it maintains sharper line associated with a  players club.

But off the clubface, or should I say all over the clubface, you get ball speed and launch conditions normally reserved for a much larger game improvement club. This iron helped redefine what is now known as the “players distance” category, and whether you consider that title an oxymoron or not, it’s impossible to argue with its popularity.

Then we have the P760, TaylorMade’s first combo iron set, which combined the power of SpeedFoam-filled longer irons with the precision of single-piece forged short irons. These irons again found their way into the golf bags of mid-handicaps to players all over the professional tours thanks to their ability to offer extra forgiveness and launch in longer clubs while still maintaining a small player’s look and preferred feel.

Regardless of skill, one of the biggest factors in the playability of any iron relies on a golfer’s ability to create speed, launch, spin, and angle of descent—the below video featuring our own Brian Knudson testing the P790 Ti is the perfect example of how an iron with strong lofts, for example, can launch higher and descend at an angle to make them playable when you combine the right technologies.

The ultimate design goal of the P770 was to combine the best of both these irons into a small, fast, playable package using every technology available to the engineers and designers at TaylorMade. This iron is about precision without sacrificing distance.

If you are a golfer looking for maximum workability and shotmaking control that puts less of a premium on distance, then the P7MB or P7MC is probably more up your ally, but if distance is still a big part of your decision-making process for a set of irons, then buckle up.

The technology

A look inside the construction of the P770

A simplistic way to describe the P770 would be to call it a shrunk-down version of the 790, but doing that would not give justice to the actual engineering that went into this design. The reason is, you can’t just shrink down a golf club and expect it to perform the same as a larger club, because not only are the mass properties different, but trying to maintain additional ball speed would be like expecting a smaller trampoline to bounce you as high as a larger one with bigger springs—the physics don’t add up.

“Designed to deliver P790-like performance in a smaller package, the all-new P770 leverages forged hollow body construction to pack as much distance and forgiveness as possible into a compact player’s shape.” – Matt Bovee, Product Creation

From address, and looking at the sole and toe profile, the P770 has a much stronger resemblance to the previous P760 than the 790, but from the back and from a technology standpoint, its got the guts of the P790.

The key technologies are

  • A SpeedFoam-supported forged 4140 high-speed steel face attached to a soft forged 8620 carbon steel body. Since the hosel is part of the forged body, you get the full lie and loft adjustability of a forged club along with the ball speed of a larger one. The secondary benefit of SpeedFoam is it creates an iron that feels extremely solid while being a multipiece construction
  • The other part of the speed story is the Thru Slot in the sole which helps shots hit lower on the face retain more ball speed and helps create extra launch. This technology runs from the 3-7 irons.
  • Speaking of launch, the new P770 has 46 grams of tungsten in the 3-7 irons positioned as low and as far back as possible towards the toe to boost MOI and launch in the longer clubs while precisely locating the center of gravity.
  • The final piece of the puzzle that helps with both distance and distance control is the Progressive Inverted Cone Technology or IVT. It is positioned closer to the toe in the longer irons to help with common mishits and moves higher and more heel ward into the shorter clubs. This keeps ball speeds variances as consistent as possible through the set.

More photos and discussion in the forums.

Choose your own P700 Series adventure

This is the part where the whole iron series really excels. For a long time, it used to be OEMs would release a number of iron sets that catered to various golfers but didn’t really have any cross over potential as far as building combo sets because of the large differences between designs. To counter this, they would often design exclusive combo sets either catered to better players or to higher handicaps/slower speed players with game improvement irons paired with hybrid long irons.

From the beginning and by design, the entire P700 series has been built to be custom combo’ed for any golfer—an impressive design feat. This allows players of varying ability with different swing and player traits to get exactly what they need out of different parts of their set. They have even gone as far to make sure that no matter how someone is looking to build their set, they can get looks, offset, bounce, and performance to match up from club to club—they even have an easy-to-follow chart!

Pricing, availability, and specs

The TaylorMade P770 irons will be available for pre-order starting August 14th and will be be available in retail shops starting September 4th.

They will be available from 3iron to pitching wedge in right and left-handed with an A wedge option available to right-handed players only. An 8 piece set starts at $1399 (174.88 per club) with KBS Tour steel shafts and Golf Pride Z-Grip grey and black as stock.

P770 Stock Specs

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